Skip to main content

Full text of "The Suma oriental of Tomé Pires : an account of the East, from the Red Sea to Japan, written in Malacca and India in 1512-1515 ; and, the book of Francisco Rodrigues, rutter of a voyage in the Red Sea, nautical rules, almanack and maps, written and drawn in the East before 1515"

See other formats





WORKS ISSUED BY 


XLhc IbaMu^t Society 


THE SUMA ORIENTAL OF TOME PIRES 

AND 

THE BOOK OF FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


SECOND SERIES 
No. XC 


ISSUED FOR 1944 



Note on this digitized version produced by McGill University Library. 

This is a digitized version of a book from the collections of McGill University 
Library. The pages were digitized as they were. The original book may have 
contained pages with poor print. Marks, notations and other marginalia 
present in the original volume may also appear. For wider or heavier books, a 
slight curvature to the text on the inside of pages may be noticeable. 

McGill University Library: 
http:/ / www.mcgill.ca/library 

ISBN: 978-1-926846-1-0-1 





THE HAKLUYT SOCIETY 

(founded 1846) 

*945 

PRESIDENT 

Edward Lynam, Esq., D.Litt., M.R.I.A., F.S.A. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

The Right Hon. The Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, K.G. 
James A. Williamson, Esq., D.Lit. 

Professor E. G. R. Taylor, D.Sc. 

TREASURER 

Edward Heawood, Esq., M.A. 
council 

J. N. L. Baker, Esq., M.A., B.Litt. 

Sir Richard Bum, C.S.I. 

A. Hugh Carrington, Esq. 

Professor F. Debenham, O.B.E., M.A. 

Sir William Foster, C.I.E. 

Guildhall Library (Raymond Smith, Esq.) 

Sir Gilbert Laithwaite, K.C.I.E., C.S.I. 

Evans Lewin, Esq., M.B.E. 

Professor Kenneth Mason, M.C., R.E. 

Walter Oakeshott, Esq., M.A. 

Professor E. Prestage, D.Litt. 

S. T. Sheppard, Esq. 

J. A. Steers, Esq., M.A. 

R. A. Wilson, Esq. 

HON. SECRETARY 

G. R. Crone, Esq., Royal Geographical Society, Kensington 

Gore, S.W.7. 

TRUSTEES 

Sir William Foster, C.I.E. 

Edward Heawood, Esq., M.A. 

Malcolm Letts, Esq., F.S.A. 

BANKERS IN LONDON 

Barclays Bank Limited, 1 Pall Mall East, s.w.i 

BANKERS IN NEW YORK 

The Guaranty Trust Company of New York, 140, Broadway 

AGENT FOR DISTRIBUTION AND SALE OF VOLUMES 

Bernard Quaritch, Ltd., 1 1 , Grafton Street, New Bond Street, w. 1 


Annual Subscription : one guinea 



'T'he hakluyt society, established in 1846, has for its object the 
A publication of original narratives of important voyages, travels, 
expeditions, and other geographical records. Books of this class are of 
the highest interest to students of history, geography, navigation, and 
ethnology ; and many of them, especially the spirited accounts and trans- 
lations of the Elizabethan and Stuart periods, are admirable examples 
of English prose at the stage of its most robust development. 

The Society has not confined its selection to the books of English 
travellers, to a particular age, or to particular regions. Where the 
original is foreign, the work is given in English, either a fresh translation 
being made, or an earlier rendering, accurate as well as attractive, being 
utilized. The works selected for reproduction are printed (with rare 
exceptions) at full length. Each volume is placed in the charge of an 
editor especially competent — in many cases from personal acquaintance 
with the countries described — to give the reader such assistance as he 
needs for the elucidation of the text. These editorial services are 
rendered gratuitously. In all cases where required for the better under- 
standing of the text, the volumes are furnished with maps, portraits, and 
other illustrations, while the author's original plates, woodcuts, or 
drawings (if any) are reproduced in facsimile. 

One hundred volumes (forming Series I) were issued from 1847 to 1898; 
eighty-eight volumes of Series II have been issued in the forty-five years 
ending in 1943. Full fists of these, of the works now in preparation and 
of the early maps reproduced in the publications are included in the 
Society's Prospectus, which is issued free to members. 

The Annual subscription of one guinea — entitling the member to the 
year’s publications — is due on January 1st of each year, and may be 
paid to : — 

Barclay's Bank, Limited, 1, Pall Mall East, London, S.W.l. 

American members may send their subscriptions to : — 

The Guaranty Trust Co. Ltd., Broadway, New York. 

All volumes are sent post free. 

Members only have the privilege of purchasing the publications of the 
Society. These tend in time to rise in value, and some of them which 
are out of print are now only obtainable at high prices. The Prospectus, 
which is carefully compiled and indexed, is a pamphlet which now has 
considerable bibliographical and historical interest. 

The Society's publication for the year 1944, which is now being bound 
for distribution, is : — ' ~ 

Voyages in the China Sea, the Indian Ocean and the Red 
Sea in 1513-14, by Tome Pires and Francisco Rodriques 
Translated, with introduction and notes, by Dr. Armando Cortesao 
Two volumes. 

The publication for the year 1945 (which is now being bound) is : 

The Voyage of Captain T. T. Bellingshausen in the Antarctic 
Ocean, 1819-21. Translated by Professor E. Bullough and edited 
with introduction and notes, by Professor F. Debenham O B E* 
Two volumes. ’ • • • 


Ladies or gentlemen desiring to be enrolled as members should send 
their names to the Hon. Secretary, with the form of Banker’s Order 
It is not necessary for them to have a proposer or seconder. 

Applications for back volumes should be addressed to the Societv’s 

Agents, Messrs. B. Quantch, Ltd., 11, Grafton Street, New Bond Street 
London, W. 1. * 


As the war has greatly increased the work of the Society's officers 
members are asked to pay their subscriptions without waiting for 
mvoices or reminders. 



COUNCIL 


OF 

THE HAKLUYT SOCIETY 
*944 


Sir William Foster, C.I.E., President . 

The Right Hon. The Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, K.G., P.C., Vice- 
President. 

Admiral Sir William Goodenough, G.C.B., M.V.O., Vice-President. 
James A. Williamson, Esq., D.Lit., Vice-President. 

The Admiralty (L. G. Carr Laughton, Esq.). 

J. N. L. Baker, Esq., M.A., B.Litt. 

Sir Richard Burn, C.S.I. 

The Guildhall Library (Raymond Smith, Esq.). 

Professor V. T. Harlow, D.Litt. 

A. R. Hinks, Esq., C.B.E., F.R.S. 

G. H. T. Kimble, Esq., M.A. 

Sir Gilbert Laithwaite, K.C.I.E., C.S.I. 

Malcolm Letts, Esq., F.S.A. 

Professor Kenneth Mason, M.C., R.E. 

Walter Oakeshott, Esq., M.A. 

N. M. Penzer, Esq., M.A., D.Litt. 

Professor E. Prestage, D.Litt. 

S. T. Sheppard, Esq. 

Professor E. G. R. Taylor, D.Sc. 

R. A. Wilson, Esq. 

Edward Heawood, Esq., M.A., Treasurer. 

Edward Lynam, Esq., D.Litt., M.R.I.A., F.S.A., Hon. Secretary 
(British Museum, W.C.i). 

The President 
The Treasurer 
Malcolm Letts, Esq., F.S.A. , 


Trustees. 




Frontispiece of the Book of Francisco Rodrigues 






THE SUMA ORIENTAL 
OF TOME PIRES 

AN ACCOUNT OF THE EAST, FROM THE RED SEA 
TO JAPAN, WRITTEN IN MALACCA AND INDIA IN 

1512-1515 


AND 

THE BOOK OF 
FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 

RUTTER OF A VOYAGE IN THE RED SEA, NAUTICAL RULES, 
ALMANACK AND MAPS, WRITTEN AND DRAWN IN THE 
EAST BEFORE 1515 


Translated from the Portuguese MS. in the Bibliotheque 
de la Chambre des Deputes, Paris, and edited by 

ARMANDO CORTESAO 


VOLUME II 


LONDON 

PRINTED FOR THE HAKLUYT SOCIETY 

1 944 



PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN BY ROBERT MACLEHOSE AND CO. LTD. 
THE UNIVERSITY PRESS GLASGOW 



SUMA ORIENTAL 

WHICH GOES FROM THE RED SEA 

TO CHINA 

Compiled by TOME PIRES 
[SIXTH BOOK] 

OF MALACCA FoL i6 4 t. 

[Early history — Neighbouring Lands — Native 
Administration — T rade — Portuguese Occupation] 

[early history] 

T HIS is the beginning of the town of Malacca, according 
to various authors, and the truth is gathered from what 
the majority affirm 1 . 

According to the Javanese, Malacca is said to be peopled in 

1 Pirns’ account of the early history of Malacca has much new information, 
and though in its essentials it agrees with some of the other accounts, it 
differs considerably from all of them. Ferrand has collected together in his 
Malaka, le Malayu et Malayur what some oriental writers, the Portuguese 
chroniclers (Barbosa, Comentarios, Correia, Castanheda, Barros, Couto and 
Eredia) and the Dutch Valentyn have written about the early history of 
Malacca; Schlegel in Geographical Notes, XV, Winstedt in A History of 
Malaya, and Wilkinson in The Malacca Sultanate, have dealt at length with 
the subject, trying to piece together the information contained in The Sajarah 
Malayu ( Malay Annals) and some Chinese and Portuguese texts. The 
Comentarios is contemporary with Pires, but the author, son of the great 
Albuquerque, never was in the East; Eredia, though bom in Malacca, wrote 
one century and Valentyn two centuries after Pires; the other Portuguese 
wrote at second hand. But Pires wrote part of his Suma in Malacca itself, 
which gives special value to his information. Some may say that Pires was 
biased, mainly in his appreciation of people connected with events after the 
arrival of the Portuguese in Malacca; but the author of ‘the olla-podrida of 
the Malay Annals’ (Winstedt, p. 35) — ‘the best record we have’ (Wilkinson, 
p. 69), though written nearly a century after Pires — a descendant of the 
Bendahara, was not less biased in the opposite direction. The comparison of 
these texts with Pires is most interesting, but it could not be undertaken here. 

Those interested in this chapter of Far-Eastern history, as intriguing as 
it is confused, will find here a vast field for research and controversy. 

229 



230 TOME PIRES 

this way, which is set down in their chronicle and which is widely 
confirmed by them. The Javanese affirm that in the year 136° 
to convert their dates to ours — there was a king in Java called 
Raja Quda, which means ‘King of the horses’, who had a son 
called Raja Baya, alias Sam Agy Jaya Baya which in the 
Javanese language means ‘Great lord of nations . This one had 
a son called Sam Ajy Dandan Gvmdoz , which means Greater 
than his predecessors’ in the said language; and this one had a 
son called Sam Ajy Jaya Taton, which means ‘Lord of all . 

This Sam Agy Jaya Taton died without sons, and the people 
together set up two chief mandarins and made one king and 
changed his name of Sam Agy , and he was called Batara, which 
means ‘Pure king’. 

This Batara Tamarill 1 had a son whom they called Biatara 
Guripan , who succeeded to the kingdom of Java. In his time a 
quarter of the land of Java rose up in revolt, and a mandarin 
rose up and called himself Biatara Caripanan Quda as will be 
told in the proper place. 

This Batara Caripan, in whose time a quarter of the land of 
Java was lost, had a son who succeeded in his place and was after- 
wards called Bataram Matara , and he was a great man of justice. 

And he had a son whom they called Bataram Sinagara , and 
they say that this one was mad and the kingdom was given to one 
of his sons, who was called Bataram Matara like his grand- 
father. This Batara Mataram had a son who is reigning in Java 
in our time, who is called Batara Vigiaja, which means ‘The 
great wise king’. His captain is the Guste Pate as will be told 
at length in the description of Java. 

The Javanese say that in the time of Batara Tomarjll , king of 
the lands and lord of the isles, he had as tributaries: Sam Agy 
Simgapura who was king of that channel, his tributary and vassal, 
and it is about two hundred and forty leagues from Java to Singa- 
pore among the islands; and that Sam Agi Palimbaao — which 
means ‘Lord of all’ — was also his tributary vassal, and it is about a 
hundred leagues from Palembang (. Palimbaao ) to Java and almost 
open sea (this is taking the longest distance; because the nearer 

1 ‘Bataratamurel (? Batara of Tumapel)’. Winstedt, p. 38. See note on 
Batara Vojyaya, p. 174. 



MALACCA 


231 


way, bordering on Sunda, is about twenty leagues); and Sam Agy 
Tamjompura — which means ‘Lord of the precious stones’ — was 
also his tributary vassal, and it is almost seventy leagues from Java 
to Tamjompura. This is the land of diamonds. 

When Sam Agi Palimbaao died, he left a son, a great knight 
and a very warlike man, whom they called Paramjfura, which 
means ‘The bravest man’ in the Palembang Javanese tongue. He 
was married to a niece of Bator a Tamarill who was called 
Paramjpure 1 , and when he realised how nobly he was married and 
how great was his power in the neighbouring islands which were 
under his brother-in-law’s jurisdiction, he rose against the 
vassalage and obedience and called himself the Great Exempt. 

When Batara Tamarill , king of Java, received the news that Fol. 164V. 
Sam Agy Palimbao had changed his name and called himself 
Mjpura which means ‘Exempt’, he decided to descend on him 
with his power and the help of the king of Tanjong Puting, and 
take the land of Palembang from him and kill and destroy him. 

Having decided this he collected his people in ships and bore 
down upon the island of Banka which is next to Palembang and 
destroyed it, and they say that he killed everyone there because 
they were Palembang people, and that he must have killed a 
thousand inhabitants of the said island; and from there he went 
to Palembang, which must be a league or two away, and began 
to lay waste the places; and when Paramjfura , king of Palembang, 
saw this, he collected about a thousand men and their wives in 
junks and lancharas, and embarked them, and he stayed on land 
with about six thousand men to give battle to the king of Java, 
his brother-in-law. 

After both sides had engaged in battle, Paramjfura fled and 
took refuge in the junks and fleet he had in the river, and all the 
people he had to defend him fell into the hands of his brother- 
in-law, and [he had] only the people who had embarked with 
him. He sailed to Singapore where he arrived with his junks and 
people, where he was received by the Sam Agy Symgapura, and 
they both stayed there. 

1 ‘Parameswara meant Prince Consort and was the style of one married to a 
princess of higher rank than himself.’ Winstedt, p. 39. Paramifure or Para- 
meswari is the feminine of Parameswara. Cf. Ferrand, Malaka , xi, 414, 447. 



232 TOME PIRES 

And eight days after his arrival the Sam Agy of Singapore was 
killed through the instrumentality of Paramjfura, and the channel 
and towns remained under the sway of Paramyfura , and he 
was lord of all and governed the channel and the islands, for 
through his industry he was able to have and acquire the land in 
justice (?); and he had no trade at all except that his people 
planted rice and fished and plundered their enemies, and lived 
on this in the said channel of Singapore. 

And the king of Siam who was father-in-law to the Sam Agy 
of Singapore [who was] married to one of his daughters by one 
of his concubines — the daughter of one of the principal man- 
darins of Patani — when he heard the news of his son-in-law, 
he decided to attack him, and he gathered people together and 
made the said mandarin (father of the Sam Agy of Singapore’s 
wife) chief captain, who came in such powerful array that the 
said Paramjfura did not dare to wait for him, and fled with 
about a thousand men and went up the Muar River, and he had 
been in Singapore for five years. 

When the said Paramjfura entered into Muar with his wife 
Paramjfure and with a thousand men, he began to cut down 
the jungle and make fields, to plant trees and make dufdes 1 and 
farms to support them; there he remained for six years, and 
there he planted things to live on; and they used to fish, and 
sometimes robbed and plundered the sampans that came to the 
Muar River to take in fresh water; they used to come in junks 
from Java and from China, as will be told in the description of 
each country about when and where they navigated. 

Meanwhile, during the reign of Batara Tumarill, king of 
Java and of many of the islands, in whose time Paramjfura had 
fled from Palembang to Muar, as we have told in describing his 
fortunes, there lived in Malacca the people we will now describe 
in order to bring ourselves to the founding of Malacca, its anti- 
quity and the kind of people who first inhabited it. 

At this time, according to the true history of the Javanese — 

1 Dufao, pi. diifdes, from the Malay dusum, means ‘village, bourgade, cam- 
pagne, endroit cultive et habits dans la foret’. Favre, Dictionnaire malais- 
franfais, s.v. Apud Ferrand, Malaka, xi, 436. ‘The farms inland, which they 
call dufdes’. Barros, 11, vi, 3. 



MALACCA 


233 

and so it is now affirmed by the Malays and all the neighbouring 
peoples — when the Celates, who are corsairs in small light craft, 
as we shall tell in their chapter when we speak of them; they are 
men who go out pillaging in their boats and fish, and are some- 
times on land and sometimes at sea, of whom there are a large 
number now in our time. | They carry blow-pipes with their Pol. 16 5r. 
s mall arrows of black hellebore which, as they touch blood, 
kill, as they often did to our Portuguese in the enterprise and 
destruction of the famous city of Malacca, which is very famous 
among the nations. 

These Celates Bugis — men who lived near Singapore and 
also near Palembang — when Paramjfura fled from Palembang 
they followed his company and thirty of them went along to- 
gether protecting his life. While Paramjfura was in Palembang 
they served as fishermen; after they came to Singapore, they 
lived in Karimun ( Carjmam ), an island near the channel; and at 
the time when the said Paramjfura came to Muar these thirty 
came to live in the place which is now called Malacca, and it 
must be five leagues from Muar to Malacca. 

As these Celates and robbers (who sometimes fished for their 
food, with their huts and their wives and children on the land) 
lived near the hill which is now called Malacca, where there is 
the famous fortress of Malacca, while Paramjfura lived in Muar 
— these Celates had knowledge of the land as men who hoped to 
live peacefully there. They fished in the river, which runs at the 
foot of the fortress, for the space of four or five years, and they 
ate, and sought to make a living at it. 

As they often went up the said Malacca River fishing, for a 
distance of a league or two away from the sea, they saw a large 
and spacious place with large fields, and lovely waters, and they 
saw how well this place was adapted for a large town, and that 
they could sow large fields of rice there, plant gardens, pasture 
herds; sometimes they used to take their wives and children 
there, and they used to make merry there; and they decided to 
settle there, and they give it the name of Bietam 1 , which means 
spacious plain. 

1 The same story is told with more or less variety and detail by several 
early writers. This place, which farther on we find spelt Bretao or Bretam, is 



TOMIi PIRES 


234 

And they all agreed together that before they went to the said 
place they would suggest to Paramjfura, who was in Muar, that 
he should order the said place to be examined to see if it was 
convenient for him, so as not to be in Muar, because he had not 
such a good dwelling-place there. And when they all went to 
make this suggestion to him, they took him a basket of fruit, and 
a tree which was near the Celates ’ houses at the foot of the hill 
where the fortress is; this the said Paramjfura received from the 
said Celates with pleasure, and asked them why they had come, 
and they told him what they had decided about letting him know 
about the said place of Bjetam in case he wanted to move there, 
for it seemed to them a good place where the said lord would be 
able to rest. 

The said Paramjfura told the Celates ‘You already know that 
in our language a man who runs away is called a Malayo, and 
since you bring such fruit to me who have fled, let this place be 
called Malaqa, which means ‘hidden fugitive’; and since your 
intentions were such that you wished to find a place for me to 
rest in, I will order it to be examined, and if it is suitable, I will 
go there with my wife and house, and I will leave the fourth part 
of my people in Muar to profit from the land where we have 
devoted so much work to reclaiming it.’ 

The Celates replied: ‘We too belong to thy ancient lordship of 
Palembang; we have always gone with thee; if the land seem 
good to thee, it is right that thou shouldst give us alms for our 
good intentions, and that our work should not be without 
reward.’ Paramjfura told them it should be so, and the Celates 
Fol. 165V. | said in front of every one that if the land seemed good to him 
and that if he wanted to go there, he should do so and call him- 
self king, and thus he could give them honour and assistance. 
He agreed to this and said that it was his wish to do this for them. 

The said Paramjfura ordered the said place of Bjetao to be 
inspected up the river by persons whom he instructed to that 
effect, and they saw the said plain surrounded by beautiful 


called Bintao in the Comentarios, Bintam by Barros, and Bretan by Eredia. 
The name survives in Sungi Bertam, an upper tributary of the Malacca 
River, and in Bertam Ulm, a place on its southern bank, north-west of 
Malacca, as it appears accurately situated on Eredia ’s maps (fols. 1 1-12). 



MALACCA 


235 


mountain ranges and abundant waters near the river which 
comes into Malacca, with many birds and animals, where there 
are lions, tigers and others of various kinds, as in fact there is no 
doubt that it is not easy to find a beautiful plain like this ex- 
tending three or four leagues, and now greatly cultivated. At 
which all those who went to see it were very satisfied and so 
reported to the said Paramjfura, and he was very pleased, and 
all his people, at the prospect of living at greater ease. 

When the said Paramjfura had moved to the said place of 
Bretao, and had rested, and was beginning to cultivate the land 
and to enjoy it, the Celates went to him — being then no more 
than eighteen— and asked him if he remembered how they had 
discovered the said land, and how in their desire for his well- 
being they had left their wives and children and had gone to 
Muar to tell him about this place which he was now enjoying. 
And they asked him to fulfil his promise and reward them with 
some gift of honour, on which petition the said Paramjfura 
made them mandarins — which means nobles — both them and 
their sons and wives for ever. Hence it is that all the mandarins 
of Malacca are descended from these, and the kings are des- 
cended through the female side, according to what is said in the 
country. 

The said fishermen having been made mandarins by the hand 
of the said Paramjfura, always accompanied the said king, and 
as he advanced them in rank they too recognized the favour 
which had been granted to them. They accompanied the king 
zealously and served him with great faith and loyalty, their 
friendship [being] whole-hearted; and in the same way the king’s 
love for them always corresponded to the true service and zeal 
of the said new mandarins, and they strove to please him, and 
their honour always lasted right down to the coming of Diogo 
Lopes de Sequeira to Malacca, when their fifth grandson was the 
Lasamana and the Bemdara who ordered the treachery to the 
said Diogo Lopes de Sequeira 1 , and he was afterwards beheaded 

1 Diogo Lopes de Sequeira was the first European to visit Malacca, where 
he arrived with a fleet of five Portuguese ships on n Sept. 1509. It has been 
supposed by some that the arrival of the fleet at Malacca was on 1 Aug., but 
Castanheda (n, cxiii) and G6is (in, i), who are more accurate in the chrono- 
logy — rather discordant in the several chronicles — of Sequeira’s voyage, both 



236 TOMli PIRES 

by the king himself, who lost Malacca, for the justice of God 
never fails, and treason to the king never goes without 
punishment. 

The said Paramjfura died in the said place of Bretao fairly 
happy in a land of such freshness, of such fertility and of such 
good living, as anyone who comes to Malacca today can see, for 
it is certainly one of the outstanding things of the world, with 
beautiful orchards of trees and shades, many fruits, abundant 
fresh waters which come from the enchanted hills which are 
within sight of Malacca, and — according to the natives — with 
hunting of many wild elephants, lions, tigers and other mon- 
strous animals, and with domestic animals, not like ours, 
except for deer. 

This Paramjfura had a son, who had been born in Singapore, 
and who was already almost a man, married to the principal 
daughter of the mandarin lords who had formerly been Celates. 

Fol. i 66 r. The son was called Chaquem Daraxa 1 , and when | he was hunt- 
ing one day in the said place of Bretam with dogs, as was his 
custom every day and most times, he was following the dogs and 
greyhounds, which are very good in these parts, and the said 
dogs were chasing an animal like a hare with feet like a little 
buck and a short tail 2 — animals of which the dogs used to kill 
ten or twelve every day — chasing it until it reached the sea by 
the hill of Malacca (where the fortress of the King our lord is 
now) so that when the said animal went into the hill it turned 
on the dogs and they began to run away. When the said Xaquem 
Daraxa saw this thing and that the said animal had regained so 

agree on the date 1 1 Sept. The Malays tried treacherously to kill the Portu- 
guese and seize the ships, but the treachery was discovered when a son of 
Timuta Raja was preparing to stab Sequeira while he played chess on board 
his ship. Sequeira then sailed away, but few of the Portuguese ashore man- 
aged to escape; some of them were killed and nineteen taken prisoners, 
amongst them Rui de Aratijo who in 15 11 was the first Portuguese factor in 
Malacca. 

1 Chaquem Daraxa , Xaquem Daraxa or Xcwuem Darxa, as spelt in different 
places, represent Muhammad Iskandar Shah/the. second ruler of Malacca. 

2 Mr. R. I. Pocock, F.R.S., of the British Museum (Natural History), when 
I showed him this passage of Pires, wrote immediately this note for me: ‘A 
small Genus of Deer common all over the Oriental Region and known to 
English sportsmen as the Muntjack or Barking Deer, its scientific name being 
Muntiacus.’ 



MALACCA 


237 


much strength on the hill that it seemed a different being, he 
returned to Bretarn where his father was in order to tell him 
about it, saying to the said Paramjfura his father: ‘Sir, when I 
was hunting today I chased a hare to your mandarin’s hill, where 
there is the fruit of the Malays, and there on the mountain the 
hare turned, either because the sea reached the foot of the hill 
or because it gained strength there, and all my dogs turned 
round and ran away; and as they used to kill ten or twelve of 
these animals every day, how was that one strong enough to 
defend itself against all the dogs so that they could not reach it? 
And because there must be some mystery about this I have come 
to tell you about it, and I ask you, sir, to go and inspect this hill, 
and we will see if we can find this animal there again, and if you 
were willing that I should make my dwelling there, I should 
rejoice greatly.’ 

Paramjfura did not want to annoy his son and went there, 
his chief mandarin— his son’s father-in-law— going as his guide 
to show the way, because of the thick grove of trees that extends 
from the said Bretao to the hill of Malacca — as it does today — 
although it is not more than two leagues, and when the king 
arrived he saw three hills almost together, at [a distance of] 
three or four good shots of a crossbow, to wit, the hill of Boqua 
China with lovely waters and very fresh, and the hill of the 
Alacras which is on the side of Tuam Colaxcar, the Javanese 
Moor, and the hill of the animal ( momte Dalimaria ) where this 
famous fortress now is 1 . Paramjfura said to his son: ‘ Xaquem 
Daxa where do you want to settle ?’ and the son said on this hill 
of Malacca. The father said it should be so. And at the said time 
he built his houses on top of the hill where the kings of Malacca 
have had their dwelling and residence until the present time. 

The said Xaqem Darxa having settled on the said hill with 
very rich houses after the fashion of the country on the hill and 

1 Boqua China is Bukit China, called BVQVET. China on Eredia’s maps 
(fol* 9) ar »d rightly situated close to Malacca on the east-north-east. Eredia’s 
map (fol. 9V.) has two hills: BVQVET. PLATO, which corresponds to Bukit 
Piatu, north-east of BVQVET. CHina, and buquet Pipi, which corresponds 
to St. John’s Hill, east of Malacca. Alacras may possibly be a mistake for the 
Portuguese word alacraus, which means scorpions. The Monte da Alimaria 
is, of course, the modern St. Paul’s Hill. See plate XXIX. 



TOMIi PIRES 


238 

on the ground beyond the bridge, where now are the customs- 
officers cellars, his father-in-law with about three hundred 
inhabitants and others were settled in Bretam. He endeavoured 
with his father to populate Malacca as much as he could. People 
began to come from the Aru side and from other places, men 
such as Celates robbers and also fishermen, in such numbers 
that three years after his coming Malacca was a place with two 
thousand inhabitants, and Siam was sending rice there. 

At this time Paramjfura fell ill and died. The kingdom de- 
scended to his son Xaquem Darxa, and he ordered the people of 
Bretam to come, and only left people like farmers there, and he 
sent all the Celate mandarins to live on the slopes of the Malacca 
hill to act as his guards; and the said places belonged to the said 
mandarins and knights who guarded his person, until the present 
day when Malacca was taken, and he strove to populate the 
land. He acted justly, wherefore people came from other places 
to live and settle there. 

Fol. i66v. As soon as Paramjfura was dead, and his son Xaquem Darxa 
became king, with six thousand inhabitants in Malacca, he sent 
a brother-in-law of his to Siam with an embassy, and bade him 
say how he by chance had come into possession of that land, and 
that he had worked so hard there that he begged him always to 
help him with foodstuffs as his right, for the land was his [the 
king of Siam’s], and that, as a man living on his land, he would 
always acknowledge him, and that he [the king of Siam] should 
help him to people the land which was his. 

The said king of Siam sent him people and foodstuffs and 
merchandise from his country, saying that he was delighted for 
it to be peopled like this, and that he would help him if he 
cultivated the land as he had said, and lastly that the ambassador 
had acquitted himself so well, and he brought back such a good 
message that Xaquem Darxa granted the said ambassador, who 
was his brother-in-law, the privilege that ambassadors should 
always be members of his family and of no other from thence- 
forward — as was the custom down to the present day when 
Malacca was captured by the Portuguese. And no one could be 
an ambassador unles he belonged to that family, and the 
ambassadors of Malacca are not allowed to do anything but 



MALACCA 


239 

present letters, and they cannot say or do anything else, as I 
have often seen in their embassies, because that is the custom. 

At this time Batara Tamarill , king of Java, was still reigning 
in Java, to whom the said Xaquem Darxa sent an ambassador, 
telling him that his father was now dead and asking that they 
should be friends and past differences be ended, and as he 
[Batara Tamarill ] held the land of Palembang from him, that 
thenceforward he would be willing to trade in his country, and 
there he would be able to distribute his merchandise, and his 
country would go on greatly increasing its population, and it 
would be continually improving, because he had known that it 
must be so and had proved it over ten years, for the monsoons 
from either direction ended there, and his junks could navigate 
there with less risk, on account of the shallows there were [on 
the way] to Pase and to other places whither his people and 
subjects navigated; and he asked him to do this. 

The king of Java, Batara Tumarill, replied that his junks had 
been navigating to Pase for a long time, and that he was closely 
bound in friendship to the place, where his merchants received 
good returns for their merchandise, and honour, and were 
exempted from customs duties; and as the said king of Pase was 
his vassal, let him send there if such was his [the king of Pase’s] 
wish; and that otherwise he would not go against it, because he 
would not break a custom of such long standing as that which 
had been agreed between them so long since. 

When the said ambassador came back he brought his reply; 
whereupon the said king Xaque Darxa sent a message to the king 
of Pase asking him to be so good as to accede, and not take it 
ill that Java should trade with Malacca, and asking him to be so 
good as to send his merchants to Malacca with merchandise 
also, saying that there was gold in his country to exchange, 
and that his country could more than provide for the needs 
of the said king of Pase and that he had written to the king of 
Java, who had replied that if [the king of Pase] agreed he would 
be very pleased. Whereupon the said king of Pase sent ambas- 
sadors to the said Xaqueri Darxa saying that he would willingly 
agree to grant what he had asked j if he would turn Moor, and Fol. i6yr. 
that he should let him know in full what he decided, so that he 



TOME PIRES 


240 

could speedily carry out his wishes. The said king Xaquem Darxa 
did not give a good reception to the ambassadors who came from 
Pase, and he took them prisoners and kept them in Bretao for 
a long time, detaining them and treating them fairly, and 
important people often came from Pase with messages to the 
said king of Malacca about the release of the ambassadors, and 
also to find out about the country and how the new population 
had grown so quickly, although the chief place of residence was 
in Bretao , where he used to go for recreation — as he always did 
until the day of his capture. 

He improved greatly in friendship with, [and became] almost 
a vassal of Batara Tumarill , king of Java, on account of the many 
junks and powerful people from that country who used at that 
time to navigate great distances (as will be told in the descrip- 
tion of Java); and he was always sending him elephants and 
gifts; wherefore, although the king of Pase had not agreed to it, 
some junks used to come to Malacca, although it was nothing 
much, because the port-of-call for all the merchandise was in 
Pase, as will be told when we deal with the island of Sumatra 
and the affairs of Pase. 

At the end of three years the said Xaquem Darxa allowed the 
ambassadors to return to Pase with honour, and the kings made 
friends, and they traded from Pase in Malacca, and some rich 
Moorish merchants moved from Pase to Malacca, Parsees, as 
well as Bengalees and Arabian Moors, for at that time there were 
a large number of merchants belonging to these three nations, 
and they were very rich, with large businesses and fortunes, and 
they had settled there from the said parts, carrying on their 
trade; and so having come they brought with them mollahs and 
priests learned in the sect of Mohammed — chiefly Arabs, who 
are esteemed in these parts for their knowledge of the said sect. 

When the said merchants arrived, they told the said kin g 
Xaquem Darxar that they had heard of his justice and of the 
mercy which he had used towards the people of Pase, and that, 
since the kings were friends, they wanted to trade in Malacca 
from Pase, and they wanted to come to the country, and, if it was 
possible, to trade there; and if a way could be opened up, they 
would stay there and would pay such duties as were imposed on 



I02‘E 


PLATE XXIX 



Malacca and neighbouring regions according to Tome Pires 






PLATE XXX 


Rodrigues’ map (fol. 19) of the North-west Coast of Africa, with 
the Azores, Madeira and Canary Archipelagos (pp. 519-20) 



MALACCA 


24I 


them, because they had been told that the people of Java wanted 
to trade and to bring merchandise which they needed, to wit, 
cloves, mace, nutmeg and sandalwood, for Java traded in them 
at this time, as will be told when the island of Java is dealt 
with. 

The said king Xaquem Darxa was very pleased with the said 
Moorish merchants; he did them honour; he gave them places 
to live in, and a place for their mosques; and when the said 
Moors received the said place they built beautiful houses 
after the fashion of the land and town. Trade began to grow 
greatly — chiefly because the said Moors were rich — and Xaquem 
Darxa , king of Malacca, derived great profit and satisfaction 
from it, and he gave them jurisdiction over themselves; and the 
Moors were great favourites with the said king, and obtained 
whatever they wanted. 

In the meantime there flocked thither those merchants who 
were in Pase, and more Moorish merchants, and they traded in 
Malacca, and from Malacca in Pase, and they went on augment- 
ing the land of Malacca, and this was not felt in Pase because of 
the large number of people who were there, as will be told in the 
proper place. 

And people from other places, from Sumatra, came to work 
and earn their living, and from Singapore and the nieghbouring 
islands of Celates, and other people; and because the said king 
Xaquem Darxa was a man of justice and liberal to the mer- 
chants, they liked him, so that | during this time two junks came Fol. ityv. 
from China, which were going to Pase, and the said king brought 
pressure to bear on some people so that they should trade there, 
and they sold some merchandise to the said merchants and they 
took a great deal more to Pase. 

At this time king Xgguem Darxa was already old, and the land 
was trading in merchandise; and there were many Moors and 
many mpllahs who were trying hard to make the said king turn 
Moor, and the king of Pase greatly desired it. The said king 
Xaquem Darxa did in fact come to want to establish the said 
priests and to like them. When this news came, the said king of 
Pase, on the advice of the priests he had sent there, secretly 
sent others of greater authority to impose upon him and turn 

B H.C.S. II. 



242 tom£ pires 

him away from his race and heathenry and to convert him, and 
this by underhand means and not publicly. 

Having been persuaded (?) either through the priests or by 
some other means, king Xaquetn Darxa made a covenant with 
the said king of Pase, arranging marriages between some of the 
said king of Pase’s daughters and the said Xaquem Darxa on 
condition that he should turn Moor like him, and that they 
would always be at one; and the said mollahs gave him to under- 
stand how much honour he would derive from the said union 
and relationship with the great king of Pase if he turned Moor, 
many messages passing between them, and the Moors working 
hard for the said marriage. 

At last, when he was seventy-two years old, the said king 
Xaquem Darxa turned Moor, with all his house, and married 
the said king of Pase’s daughter. And not only did he himself 
turn Moor, but also in the course of time he made all his people 
do the same. And in this way the said king turned Moor, and 
from thenceforward they were so until the capture of Malacca; 
and he lived in matrimony for eight years surrounded by 
mollahs, and he left a grown-up son, who also" turned 'Moor, 
born of his first wife, who inherited the kingdom and was called 
Modafarxa 1 . 

When this king Xaquem Darxa was forty-five years old, he 
wanted to go to China in person to see the king of China, and he 
left the kingdom in the hands of the mandarins, saying that he 
wanted to go and see the king to whom Java and Siam were 
obedient, and Pase, as will be told at length in the description 
of China. And he went where the king was and talked to him, 
and made himself his tributary vassal, and as a sign of vassalage 
he took the seal of China with Malacca in the centre (?), as they 
all have it. He was greatly honoured and sent home with gifts 
and greatly entertained. And he returned to Malacca, and the 
journey going there and his stay and return, took three years. 

And the said Xaquem Darxa came in the company of a great 
captain who brought him by command of the said king of China. 
This captain brought with him a beautiful Chinese daughter, 
and when the said Xaquem Darxa reached Malacca, in order to 
1 Muzaffar Shah or Mudzafar Shah. 



MALACCA 


243 

do honour to the said captain, he married her, although she was 
not a woman of rank. And heathens do not mind being married 
to Moorish women, because it is the custom here, and the Moors 
are better pleased to marry their women to heathens than for 
themselves to marry heathen women, as they make their hus- 
bands Moors. This is the custom in these countries. The king of 
China allowed this Xaqem Darxa to take to Malacca tin money 
that is like ceitis. 

The said king Xaquem Darxa had a son by this Chinese 
woman, who was called Rajapute 1 , from whom are descended 
the kings of Pahang and Kampar and Indragiri, as will be told 
later. He was a very good man and had sons and daughters and 
afterwards died at the hands of Madafarsa his nephew, as will 
be told in the life of the said king Madafarxa. 

This king Madafarxa had many wives, the daughters of 
neighbouring kings. They say that he was a better king than all 
those who had gone before. He greatly strengthened his ties 
with Siam and with Java and with the Chinese and Lequjos. He 
was a great man of justice; he devoted much care to the improve- 
ment of Malacca; he bought and built junks and sent them out 
with merchants, for which even today the old merchants of the 
said king’s time praise him greatly, especially as a very just man. 

And this king Modafarxa acquired lands for Malacca, to wit, Fol. i 68 r 
on the Kedah side he obtained Myjam, which is a good place 
and has a river, though not a big one; tin is produced in this 
country. It is a tributary of Malacca, as will be told more at large 
when the places which pay tribute to Malacca are dealt with. 

And he also took Selangor, which means tin, also a good place, 
and he made it too a tributary just like the other, and from these 
places, which must be about ten leagues from Malacca, they 
bring some foodstuffs to Malacca. In the same way he took the 
town of Cheguaa, which is on the river Fremoso 2 beyond Muar on 

1 Radjaputih, i.e., ‘White Raja’. Cf. Ferrand, Malaka, xi, 421. 

2 Rio Fremoso, or Rio Formoso, is the Sungi Sempang Kanan, also called 
Sungi Batu Pahat, from the name of the town near its entrance, which must 
correspond to Pires’ Cheguaa. The highest peak of the hills on the east bank 
of the mouth of the river is still called Mount Formosa (1416 feet). Rodri- 
gues’ map (fol. 34) is the first to record Rio fermosso, which afterwards 
appears on nearly every map down to the seventeenth century. 



TOM^ PIRES 


244 

the Singapore side, a large river where many ships can enter, on 
which river there is a little rice, meats and fish; they have wines 
of the country; it is a river with wide meadows; it has fighting 
men. They say that strong and valiant people come from Muar 
and from Cheguaa. One of these places belongs to the Bemdara 
and the other to the Lasamana; each of them has civil and 
criminal jurisdiction — or they had in their time. 

And this Madafarxa often used to go out to fight in person, 
and his brother Raja Pute remained as Paduca Raja 1 , which 
means viceroy. He often fought against the king of Aru, and 
took from him the kingdom of Rokan ( Jrcam ), which is opposite 
Malacca in the land of Aru. And as long as he lived he always 
made war on him, according to what they say. 

This king took the Singapore channel with the island of Bin- 
tang ( Bimtarn ) and brought it all under his obedience, up to the 
present time, where now he has taken refuge in flight; and he 
went to war over the said channel with the king of Pahang, and 
of Trengganu ( Talimgano ) and of Patani, and he always had the 
best of it, and therewithal he retained the land and jurisdiction, 
and he married one of his elder sisters to the said king of 
Pahang, who had recently turned Moor, and this will be about 
fifty-five or sixty years ago at the most. He had turned Moor at 
the request of the said Modafarxa, and [with the promise] that 
he would give him his sister in marriage. 

This king made war on Kampar and Indragiri; and he fought 
for a long time against these two kingdoms, which are in the land 

1 ‘ Padiika — an affectionate epithet; beloved, dear.’ Marsden, Dictionary. 
According to Ferrand the Malay paduca is a royal and princely title, like 
‘Your Majesty’ or ‘Your Highness’. Malaka, xi, 460. ‘There used to be in 
Malacca five principal dignities. The first is Pudricaraja, which signifies 
Viceroy, and after the king this is one of the greatest. The second is Bendara, 
who is the controller of the Treasury and governs the kingdom. Sometimes 
the Bendara holds both of these offices of Pudricaraja and Bendara, for two 
separate persons in these two offices never agree well together. The third is 
Lassamane; this is Admiral of the Sea. The fourth is Tamungo, who is charged 
with the administration of justice upon foreigners. The fifth is Xabandar; and 
of these there were four, one of each nation — one of China, another of Java, 
another of Cambaya, another of Bengala. And all the lands were divided 
among these four men, and everyone had his portion, and the Tamungo was 
Judge of the Custom House, over all these.’ Commentaries of Afonso Dalbo- 
querque, in, 87-8. See below pp. 264-5. 



MALACCA 


245 

of Menangkabau, whence gold comes to Malacca; and in the 
course of time the said Modafarxa squeezed them so much, as 
they were rich, and because different races navigated to his port, 
and because he was allied with the Javanese and the Chinese and 
the Siamese, and in Pase, that through his own endeavours he 
married two daughters of Raja Pute his brother, one to the king 
of Kampar and the other to the king of Indragiri; and the said 
kings and the people nearest to them became Moors, all the rest 
still remaining heathens, and so they turned Moors about fifty 
years ago at the most. 

And because of the honour he gained through making these 
three kings Moors [and] tributaries, his name became so famous 
that he had messages and presents from the kings of Aden and 
Ormuz and of Cambay, and Bengal, and they sent many mer- 
chants from their regions to live in Malacca, and he was called 
Sultan, for in this country any lord is called Raja, only in Pase, 

Malacca and Bengal are they called Sultans; and be very careful 
in this, when a letter comes from Portugal for any king here, to 
say ‘from the Sultan of Portugal to thee, Raja So-and-So’. 

This king used his powers greatly to see if he could destroy 
Aru, although the king of Aru had turned Moor before any of 
the others, even before the king of Pase according to what they 
say; but because they say he is not a true believer in Mohammed, 
and he lives in the hinterland, he has many people and he has 
many pinnaces, they are always out pillaging, and wherever they 
descend they take everything, and they live on this, and this can 
never be remedied because the land of Aru is like this. And from 
Aru they can cross to the land of Malacca in one day, and the 
men of Aru are greatly feared, and from the time of Modafarxa 
until the capture of Malacca by the Governor of India they were 
always enemies, and they still are today. This Modafarxa sent 
ambassadors to Java to the heathen king, and they say that by 
secret means he found a way through his priests to induce 
important men | from the coastal districts to turn Moors, and Fol. i68v. 
these are now pates. This will be dealt with in the description of 
Java. The said Modafarxa was a vassal of the said king of Java 
and sent him elephants and things from China and rich cloths 
from among those which came to his port, and as long as he 



246 TOME PIRES 

lived he always maintained his friendship with the said king; and 
a large quantity of foodstuffs came from Java. He greatly im- 
proved the port of Malacca. 

In the meantime the king of Pahang’s wife died, and the said 
Modafarxa had him married to one of his nieces, daughter of his 
brother Raja Pute ; and the said Raja Pute was thus connected 
with Pahang, Kampar and Indragiri; and the people of Malacca 
already believed greatly in Raja Pute , who was older than Moda- 
farxa, so they say, and he had not inherited because he was the 
son of a concubine, practically a wife; others say that he was 
rather the son of the Chinese girl, born somehow or other. He 
had great authority. He was a good man, of excellent judgement; 
he had a great regard for the king his brother. He lived in the 
place Bretao of which we have already spoken, and the kings 
lived there too; but sometimes they repaired to the city, where 
they lived on the hill, as we have already said, because with the 
tide they can descend from Bretao to Malacca in an hour. 

At this time there was a large number of merchants of many 
nationalities in Malacca, and Pase was already beginning to be 
less great than it had been, and the merchants and sea-traders 
realised how much difference there was in sailing to Malacca, 
because they could anchor safely there in all weathers, and could 
buy from the others when it was convenient. They began to 
come to Malacca all the time because they got returns. The king 
of Malacca dealt kindly and reasonably with them, which is a 
thing that greatly attracts merchants, especially the foreigners. 
He took pleasure in being in the city much more often than he 
went hunting, so that he could hear and decide about the abuses 
and tyrannies which Malacca creates on account of its great 
position and trade. 

This Modafarxa had by his wife a son, who was called Man- 
surs a 1 . This boy was under the guardianship of his uncle Raja 
Pute. He was always taught and looked after by Raja Pute as his 
tutor; and they were both given to pleasure, and the father 
worked at the things which were his duty. And so during this 
time the said Modafarxa came to be ill in bed, and his son 
Mansursa came to stay with his said father in the city; they 

1 Mansur Shah. 



MALACCA 


247 

obeyed the boy Mamsursa. Raja Pute had authority in Bretam ; 
they did what he commanded. Madafarxa was worried about his 
illness, and also because he did not know what changes would 
take place on his death in the kingdom where he had worked so 
hard. He asked Raja Pute and charged him to hand it peaceably 
over to Mamsursa. Raja Pute said he would do so. The youth 
was already twenty years old, they say, or a little less. The 
father Madafarxa died; the boy began to do his duty, after his 
father’s death and burial, honourably as was right, and also on 
the advice of Raja Pute. 

After the burial, Raja Pute retired to Bretao and Mamsursa 
began to reign wisely over his kingdom, taking counsel of the 
old men, for virtuous government in matters of justice and the 
preservation of the country; he gathered people together. At this 
time it seems to have come to the young man’s notice that Raja 
Pute, his uncle, either because he was old, or because he had so 
many ties in the country and outside, was treating him with 
disrespect in not coming to see him, being the king he was. One 
day he paid a surprise visit to the place where the said Raja Pute 
was, and he found him in a balecy (which is like a bower, 
richly elaborated ) 1 with mandarins and important people who 
were with him. 

When the said Mamsursa arrived they all stood up, and he sat 
down, and Raja Pute beside him, which is not the custom here, 
for the son does not sit down with his father even if he is the 
heir, unless the son is a married king, as will be told in the proper 
place on the customs of the Malays. The young man said: ‘ Raja 
Pute , it is so many days since I have seen you. Are you ill?’ He 
replied: ‘I have not been doing very well.’ The young man said: 

‘Yes, you are not doing very well as a king.’ He then thrust his 
kris into him three or four times, and then Raja Pute fell dead 
on the spot. And for this reason the people always greatly feared 
the said king Mansursa, and he was much feared, and respected 
and helped by his fellow countrymen whenever he wanted them. 

King Mamsursa began to follow in his father’s footsteps, both Fol, i6gr. 

2 Balecy must correspond to the Malay bain. Marsden gives, among other 
meanings of this word: ‘A lodge or summer house; a frame, stand, stage (for 
sitting on, curing fish, &c.).’ Dictionary, p. 34. 



248 TOM £ PIRES 

in ruling the people and encouraging his men greatly to war. He 
was peaceful to the merchants and a man of good will. He had 
the allegiance of Malacca, Selangor ( Calangor), Bernam (Ver- 
nam ), Mijam, Perak (Pirac), all of which are places for tin 
and belong to the kingdom of Kedah, and he had been at war 
with Kedah about this. As it was a country of the kingdom of 
Siam, and as all the land belonged to the kingdom of Siam, these 
places were faced with the choice to whom they would be in 
allegiance. They said: to king Mamsursa , king of Malacca; and 
they maintained this allegiance until the taking of Malacca, 
paying tributes, as will be told in detail later. 

Through his captains in the kingdom of Aru, the said king 
Mamsursa took by force the town of Rupat which is opposite 
to Malacca, and the kingdom of Siak; he made the Sheikh of 
Porim his vassal — all this in the island of Sumatra. These people 
came to Malacca as prisoners, and in his own good time he 
sent them back to their countries, and they always remained 
obedient to him until the day when it was taken by the Great 
Captain of India. 

During Mamsursa' s reign, the kings of Pahang and of Kampar 
and of Indragiri rebelled against him on account of the death of 
Raja Pute , their father-in-law, whom he had killed. And in 
person as well as through his captains he took them and con- 
quered them and doubled their tributes, and put them under 
him as tributaries, and he made peace with them and [arranged] 
marriages; and the said Mamsursa married one of the king of 
Pahang’s daughters and the king of Pahang married one of 
Mamsursa' s sisters, and another of his sisters married the king of 
Menangkabau, who was a heathen, and made him turn Moor. 
Others affirm that the said king is still not a Moor to this day. 
The truth is that he is a Moor, with about a hundred of his men; 
all the other people are heathens. 

This Mamsursa had one of the daughters of Raja Pute his 
uncle as a concubine, and as a wife he had the daughter of his 
Lasamane. This Mamsursa was chivalrous and very luxurious, 
just, always a true vassal of the kings of the Chinese and of the 
kings of Java and of Siam; and the nature of this vassalage will 
be told later. 



MALACCA 


249 

The Moors of Malacca say that Mamsursa was a better king 
than all his predecessors. He granted liberties to the foreign 
merchants; he was always a fervent lover of justice. They say 
that at night he used to go about the city in person; they say that 
he slept little and played much at dice; he was fond of tilting at 
the beam after our fashion, as the Chinese do in their country. 
This Mamsursa raised men from nothing. The comptroller of 
his exchequer was a heathen Kling, and they say he had such 
influence with him that he did nothing but what he wished; and 
in the same way a Cafre of Palembang who was his slave had such 
influence, that people said they were winning him back to his 
original heathenry. Finally both these men, to wit, the Kling and 
the Palembang, rose so high that they turned Moor in the time of 
Mamsursa ; and the Bendara whom they beheaded here, who was 
involved in the betrayal of Diogo Lopes de Sequeira, was his 
grandson and was already more powerful than the king; and the 
Palembang’s grandson is the Lasemana who is now with the ex- 
king of Malacca; and these two men grew so powerful in the 
time of this king Mansursa that they reached very high digni- 
ties; and what the Bendara and the Lasemana are will be told later. 

This king Mansursa was married to a daughter of the king of 
Pahang, a niece of the king of Siam; and the said king thought 
much of this having his sons greater than all his ancestors. Man- 
sursa was a sociable man, liberal, a gambler and luxurious; but 
withal he was just. He took all the beautiful daughters of the 
Parsee merchants and the Klings who pleased him to be his 
concubines, made them turn Moors when he had to give them 
in marriage, and he married them to mandarin’s sons and 
gave them dowries; and this custom of marrying people of 
different sects causes no surprise in Malacca. 

This king Mansursa built the beautiful mosque which used to 
be where now is the famous fortress of Malacca, and which was 
the finest known in these parts; and he ordered bridges, richly 
elaborated, to be built over the river. This king lowered the 
duties on merchandise, as will be told in the proper place; 
wherefore he was so much esteemed by the natives and foreigners 
that he achieved great wealth, and amassed a great treasure. 
They say he was a man with a hundred and twenty quintals of 



TOME PIRES 


25O 

gold and quantities of precious stones, and that he had decided 
to go to Mecca with a large amount of gold in a junk which he 
had ordered to be built in Java, and another in Pegu of great 
Fol. i 6 gv. size, and that if his illness had not prevented him | he would 
have gone there. He had already spent a great deal of money, 
and [collected] many people for the journey. This Mamsursa 
always maintained firm allegiance to the Javanese, Chinese and 
Siamese, and he always presented them with elephants, because 
the jungles of Malacca produce many, and he had great numbers 
of them; and according to the country, so he sent things accord- 
ing to their taste there, but he did not send money, as will be 
told when we describe the form of allegiance he had to these 
three kingdoms. 

This king Mamsursa had two sons and two daughters. The 
elder son was called Alaoadin l , who succeeded him, and the 
other son died when he was hunting. He married one of his 
daughters to the king of Kampar and the other to the king of 
Pahang. When he was old he fell ill; he was ill for a long time, 
and king Alaoadim , his son, ruled over the kingdom, and while 
he was ruling this king married one of the daughters of a chief 
mandarin, to his father’s satisfaction. And king Mansursa died; 
he was buried in the tomb of the kings in accordance with the 
custom, on the hill where now stands the gallows, in contempt of 
his vanity and the honour in which they held the place. 

At the beginning of his reign this king Alaoadin married a 
daughter of the king of Kampar, who was his first cousin. This 
king added to Malacca many islands belonging to the Celates, 
who are corsairs after their kind in small paraos. Through his 
captains he took the islands of Linga which are on this side of 
Banka, almost opposite to Palembang, where are the cabaes 
knights who cannot be killed by steel, as will be told in the de- 
scription of the Linga islands. And the said king Alaoadin made 
their king his vassal, as he still is; [as he has] fled, however, they 
do not see one another, because they are both afraid of each other. 

1 Sultan Alauddin or Alaedin. ‘ Alaoadim est la forme portugaise du 
nom arabe 'Ala’u’d-din, “l’£l£vation de la religion”,’ says Ferrand in a note to 
his translation of the history of Malacca contained in the Comentarios. Malaka 
xi, 422. 



MALACCA 


251 

This king had a quarrel with the Arus and he was defeated by 
them at sea. They say that this king was more devoted to the 
affairs of the mosque than to anything else; and he was a man 
who ate a great deal of afiam, which is opium, and sometimes he 
was not in his right mind. He was a solitary man and was 
not often in the town; and in his time he amassed more riches 
and swore to go to Mecca to carry out his father’s pilgrimage; 
and he hoped to be there with the things he was making ready 
for this. This king Alaoadin always had the kings of Pahang, 
Kampar and Indragiri, and their relatives, with him in Malacca, 
at court as it were, and he instructed them in the things of 
Mohammed, because he knew all about them. Others say that 
these kings came to the weddings he arranged with the king of 
Pahang, who took one of his daughters to wife, and he had both, 
for it is the custom for them to be taken in this way; they may 
have four, and the son of the first inherits the kingdom. 

However the said kings came to be in Malacca, there they 
were, for all the things and lands and districts were nothing 
in comparison with Malacca, because Malacca is the port at the 
end of the monsoons, whither large numbers of junks and ships 
come, and they all pay dues, and those who do not pay give 
presents, which are much the same thing as dues; and for this 
reason, because the king of the country puts his share in each 
junk that goes out, that is a way for the kings of Malacca to 
obtain large amounts of money; and hence there is no doubt that 
the kings of Malacca are very rich indeed. 

This king having decided to go to Mecca, and being in Bret am, 
he wanted to come to Malacca to complete his preparations; and 
in seven or eight days he died of fevers 1 . He left two sons and 
three daughters. The first was Raja Qaleman 2 , and he was the 
son of the wife who was the king of Pahang’s daughter; and of 
the three daughters one was by the woman from Pahang; and he 

1 According to Wilkinson (pp. 54, 62), Alauddin was a strong man who 
died (poisoned by his own brother the Sultan Mahmud Shah of Pahang) in 
the flower of his age, when he could hardly have been thirty. 

2 Sulayman. In the Comentarios it is said also that Celeimao (Sulayman) 
was a son of Alaoadim\ but Winstedt (p. 51) informs us that Sulayman and 
Alauddin were brothers, ‘as is proved by his grave recently found at Sayong 
Pinang on a remote tributary of the Johor River’. 



252 TOME PIRES 

had Raja Mafamut 1 who lost Malacca, and was a son of the 
mandarin’s daughter; and of the three daughters, one was by the 
above mentioned woman from Pahang, and the [other] two by 
the wife who was a daughter of the king of Kampar. Because 
the sons were still boys when the said king Alaoadim died, the 
Bemdara ruled the kingdom until the boys came of age. Some 
favoured Raja (jaleimam. The Bemdara favoured Raja Mafamut , 
who was his grandson, his daughter’s son; but the kingdom 
belonged to Raja (jaleman not merely because he was a queen’s 
son, for the other [wives] are of lesser standing, although they 
are taken so that their sons may inherit. 

Four or five years passed and the principal mandarins began 
to form factions and parties. Pahang on his part worked for his 
grandson to inherit the kingdom; the Bemdara was powerful in 
the country and could have had the kingdom for himself if he 
had not wanted it for his grandson. He held it was a certainty for 
Fol. iyor. Raja Mafamut his grandson, and for this | he had resources and 
many relations to bring it about, as has been told. Although it 
says above that this king Mafamut was a grandson of the Bem- 
dara they beheaded, he was only the grandson of his brother, 
being the son of one of his daughters, and this is the truth, as I 
afterwards made out 1 2 . 

They raised the said king Mafamut to be king of Malacca, and 
at the beginning of his reign, in order to make peace with 
Pahang, he married one of the king of Pahang’s daughters 3 ; and 
this king was less just than any of the previous ones, very 

1 Mahmud Shah. 

2 In order to understand this complicated relationship it must here be said 
that, according to Wilkinson and Winstedt, Sultan Mahmud was the son of 
Tuan Senaja, wife of Sultan Alauddin. Tuan Senaja was the sister of Tuan 
Mutahir (the Bendahara slain in 1510 by order of his nephew Sultan 
Mahmud), both of them children of the Bendahara Tuan Ali Sri Nara Diraja 
and Tuan Kundu (first married to Sultan Muzaffar Shah), a sister of Tuan 
Perak who succeeded Tuan Ali Sri Diraja as Bendahara. It seems that Pires, 
not unnaturally, mixed up all these intricated relationships. Mahmud was in 
fact the nephew of Tuan Mutahir, the ‘Bendahara they beheaded’ (it is more 
likely that he was simply killed with the kris), and the grandson of Tuan Ali 
Sri Nara Diraja (who was not killed) and Tuan Kundu, a sister of Tuan 
Perak who was also a Bendahara. See note on Pate Cuguf, pp. 193-4. 

3 The king of Pahang was Sultan Mahmud Shah, a son of Sultan Mansur 
Shah, and thus an uncle of his namesake at Malacca. 



MALACCA 


253 

luxurious, intoxicated with opium every day. He was presump- 
tuous; he brought the kings of Pahang and Kampar and Indra- 
giri to Malacca by force. He was treated with such respect that 
they never spoke to him except from a great distance and very 
seldom. He was a great eater and drinker, brought up to live 
well and viciously. He was feared by the other kings; when they 
spoke to him it was with great reverence and courtesies of their 
kind. He was called Sultan Mafamut. 

In his arrogance he then withdrew his obedience from the 
king of Siam, and would not send an ambassador to his country 
any more, nor to Java either. He only remained obedient to 
China, saying why should Malacca be obedient to the kings who 
were obedient to China? Wherefore the king of Siam sent his 
captains by sea to make war on Malacca about fifteen years ago, 
and the king of Malacca’s Lasemana sallied forth and defeated 
them at the island of Pulo Pisang ( Pulo Ptfam) 1 where they met 
the Siamese; so that since that time he has never again been at 
peace with Siam, and it must be twenty-two years now since 
they broke off [relations] and the Siamese never came back to 
Malacca until now that Malacca is ours. 

The king of Java did not care about Malacca nor about its 
obedience, because it had no interest for him, as his seaports 
were already in the hands of the Moors; he has the hinterland 
and cannot make war on Malacca because he is powerless on the 
sea, as will be told at length when we speak of the whole island 
of Java and of its affairs and people and conditions, and of how 
the Moors are already in possession of the sea-coasts. The said 
king Mafamut boasted in Malacca when he fought with the king 
of Siam’s captains and there were found ninety thousand men 
able to take up arms. He was so proud and unreasonable and 
presumptuous about this, that he said that he alone was strong 
enough to destroy the world, and that the world needed his 
port because it was at the end of monsoons, and that Malacca 
was to be made into Mecca, and that he would not hold the 
opinion of his ancestors about going to Mecca; and there- 
fore the learned Moors and the people say that it was on account 

1 Pulo Pisang appears for the first time as pulo pica on P. Reinel’s maps of 
c. 1517 and c. 1518. 



254 TOMli PIRES 

of the arrogance of this sin that he was lost, and all bore him 
ill-will. 

This king Mafamut was afraid that Raja Qaleman would rise 
up with the kingdom, and he ordered him to be killed in 
Malacca; and he had Raja Jalim 1 with him in Malacca — the 
father of the boy who was now king of Kampar and was called 
Raja Audela 2 3 . They all say that this Raja Jalim was a very 
good man; and because he saw him from his house walking 
along a street with many companions, he said at once: ‘That 
is already in order to take away my kingdom which he will 
say belongs to him.’ Raja Jalim heard of this and became a 
hermit, like men who despise the world, and yet he obviously 
had him poisoned, though he was his first cousin, and he killed 
Raja Bunco, his nephew, with a kris, because he wanted to go 
to Aru. They say that this man was more worthy than Raja 
Jalim. 

With a kris he also killed Raja Jalim! s sister who was his wife, 
mother of king Amet 3 his son, for no reason, but just because 
the fancy came to him when he was intoxicated with opium. 
He is a very fickle man, of diabolical cruelty. In his time, 
after these things had taken place and he had killed many other 
men, Diogo Lopes de Sequeira arrived in the ships. He killed 
Tuam Porpate 4 , a very great mandarin, and his son Tuam 
Afem s , who were like Raja Bunco, and these [were killed] with 
a kris. 

When Diogo Lopes de Sequeira arrived before the port of 
Malacca, there were at that time — according to what is truly 
Fol. 170V. stated — a thousand Gujarat merchants in Malacca, | among 
whom there were a great many rich ones with a great deal of 

1 Raja Zainal- Abidin. 

2 Abdullah, whom Barros calls Abedela (11, ix, 7) and G6is Abbadella 
(hi, lxiii). In 1515 he was made Bendahara of Malacca, in place of Ninachatu, 
and then beheaded a few months later, due to the intrigue of Mahmud, the ex- 
king of Malacca. See note pp. 288-9. 

3 Ahmad. 

4 Tuan Perpateh Puteh, a brother of Tuan Perak, whom he succeeded 
as Bendahara. Tuan in Malay means ‘ master lord, sir, mistress, madam’. 
Marsden, Dictionary, s.v. 

s Tuan Hasan. According to Wilkinson (p. 59) this was a son of Tuan 
Mutahir, not of Tuan Perpateh Puteh. 



MALACCA 


255 

capital, and some who were representatives of others; and in this 
way they say that with Parsees, Bengalees and Arabs there were 
more than four thousand men here, including rich merchants 
and some who were factors for others. 

There were also great Kling merchants with trade on a large 
scale and many junks. This is the nation which brings the most 
honour to Malacca. These have the bulk [of the trade] in their 
hands as will be told later. First the Gujaratees went to the said 
king Mafamut with a great present, and also the Parsees and 
Arabs and Bengalees and many of the Klings reported to the said 
king together, that the Portuguese had reached the port, and 
consequently were bound to come there every time, and that, 
besides robbing by sea and by land, they were spying in order to 
come back and capture it [Malacca], just as all India was already 
in the power of the Portuguese — whom they call Franks 
(Framges) here — that because Portugal was far away they ought 
to kill them all here and that the news could not reach Portugal 
for a long time, if ever, and that Malacca would not be lost, nor 
its merchants, emphasising the case in such a way that the king 
replied that he would speak to the Bemdara, and he would decide 
what seemed best to him in this. These who had spoken went to 
the Bemdara ; they took him double the present — and most of it 
was from the Guj aratees; they converted the Bemdara to their plot, 
and they further suggested to the said Bemdara that he should 
ask the king for the flag-ship for himself, for it carried many 
bombards. 

The above mentioned merchants took a present to the Lasa- 
mane so that he should help them in this, and they did the same 
to the Tomungo, who was the Bemdara’ s brother, and they asked 
the son of the Javanese Utemuta Raja 1 , whom they beheaded 
here, to take part in this and to ask for one of those ships [of the 
Portuguese]. So they were all informed and ready waiting to see 
what the king wished. In the meantime Diogo Lopes unloaded 
some merchandise in godowns in order to make up his cargo, 
which thing they say encouraged the plot, so that they could get 
the merchandise for the king and Bemdara. 

The said king called into council the Bemdara and the Lase- 

1 Timuta Raja. 



tom£ pires 


256 

mana and the Tumungo Cerina De Raja 1 , who they say was the 
wisest man in Malacca, and he summoned Tua Mafamut, who 
afterwards died at our hands, who was one of the chief people, 
and others who had already been appointed to the council; and 
the said king consulted them all as to the action to be taken on 
what the merchants of the various nationalities reported about 
the coming of this captain. The Bemdara and Tuam Mafamut 
and the other mandarins told the said king that the right thing 
was to kill them all, and that it would soon be done, for he 
would find the way to do it. The king asked the Lasemana and 
the Tomunguo what they thought. They both said that they were 
not of that opinion, but that they [the Portuguese] should be 
well treated and made content, and keep their merchandise, 
since they had come to his port in good faith; and if these men 
were such and so bad as they said, that they should tell them to 
go away and not to stay in the port. 

The king said: ‘You do not understand the case of these men. 
They come to spy out the land so that they can come afterwards 
with an armada, as I know and you know that they go about con- 
quering the world and destroying and blotting out the name of 
our Holy Prophet. Let them all die, and if any other people come 
here afterwards, we will destroy them on the sea and on the 
land. We have more people, junks, gold in our power than any- 
one else. Portugal is far away. Let them all be killed.’ They 
called the merchants, and the king told them that the Bemdara 
already had the reply and that they should speak to him. 

They say that the king told the Lasemana and the Bemdara : 
‘You, Lasemana, will put to sea in your lancharas and kill them all, 
and do not send the Portuguese ships to the bottom, and keep the 
guns for me and also the flag-ship. And the Bemdara will attack 

1 It seems that Pires mixed up his information once more. According to 
Wilkinson (pp. 55-67), Tuan Tahir, the Sri Nara Diraja (a brother of Tuan 
Mutahir, the Bendahara Sri Maharaja), was the Chief Treasury Officer; the 
Tumungo or Temenggong was Tuan Hasan (son and successor of Tuan 
Mutahir in the office of Temenggong). All three, with other members of the 
family, were killed together by order of Sultan Mahmud in 1510, at the insti- 
gation of the Laksamana Khoja Hasan, a favourite with the Sultan and an 
enemy of the Bendahara. But from what Pires says it does not seem that the 
Laksamana was much of a favourite with the Sultan. Probably Pires means 
Tuan Tahir Sri Nara Diraja, when he refers to the Tumungo Cerina De Raja. 



MALACCA 


257 

those who are weighing [goods] on land, because we will turn 
them all out; and be careful on the sea, although you alone could 
account for ten such ships. One who destroyed the Siamese on 
the open sea, where there were | a hundred to one of ours, what Fol. iyir. 
will he do to such a little thing at anchor? Why, those who go to 
sell them chickens will be a match for them, for they are not 
fighting men, as I am informed.’ 

The Lasemana said: ‘This business is contrary to justice, and 
I do not want to be in it, and I tell you that I would rather fight 
against a thousand such men than against these, not because I 
fear them, but because my heart is not in such a decision.’ The 
Bemdara' s son crossed him and said: ‘My lord, I will go if the 
Lasemana does not want to.’ The king said he thanked him 
for it. The Lasemana replied: ‘Go; but if your business succeeds, 

I do not know anything, and all the people in Malacca together 
are not strong enough to capture these ships, nor is there any 
reason for it.’ 

This speech incensed the king against the Lasemana , and he 
wanted to have him killed, because he had made so much of such 
a small matter, and he ordered him not to leave his house. The 
Bemdara and his eldest son and Utamutarraja’s son and the 
captain of the Gujaratees went into this together. They say that 
each of them wanted a ship [of the Portuguese] and that they 
fell out over the choice, and in order that they should not 
cheat each other, as they often do, they arranged to seize those 
people on land who had to collect cloves in different places. The 
people disembarked; everyone knows what was done on land 
and what the Lord prevented on the sea . 1 

After the said Diogo Lopes had left the port, they prepared 
again to sail to see if they could catch him. In the end the kin g 
was very dissatisfied and sent for the Lasemana and asked him 
how past events looked to him; and the Lasemana told him that 
[they looked] bad and that he should seek to make himself 
strong, as the Portuguese would attack Malacca, and that he 
would then find out who would defend it against the Franks, 
men without fear, who had conquered the world. Wherefore 
the Bemdara was on bad terms with the king thereafter, and 

1 See note above, pp. 235-6. 


c 


H.C.S. II. 



258 TOM Ii PIRES 

very much so, and for this reason he killed him, as will be told 
later; and the whole thing is the judgement of God. 

King Mafamut began to make himself strong on the Lasa- 
mana's advice; he did not receive him quite so well as he used to 
receive the Bemdara Cerima Raja who was almost as powerful 
as the said king. And they say he began secretly to take posses- 
sion of the land; others say not, but the Bemdara is second after 
the king, as will be told later. After this thus this Bemdara cir- 
cumcised certain of our men by force with their hands tied, and 
as a result one died and others escaped by means of bribes paid 
secretely to the Bemdara by Njna Chatu . 1 

The king began to make himself strong. He was uneasy lest 
the Bemdara should rise up with the kingdom, because the king 
was unknown compared with the Bemdara , and with a kris he 
killed the Bemdara Cerima Raja , Tuam Afem , and Tuam Zeynar, 
his sons, and Tuam Zedij Amet and Tuam Racan, his grandsons, 
all of whom were greater than kings of Pahang and Kampar. He 
killed Cirima Raja, the Bemdara' s brother, and Tuam Adut Alill 
and Tuam Aly and Tuam Amet, the sons of the said Cirjma de 
Raja Tumungo, all of whom were his relations, for which 
cruelties the said king rendered himself odious and was hated by 
everyone; moreover this family deserved it for the advice they 
had given against Diogo Lopes de Sequeira. 

He took the wives and children of all those he killed for him- 
self, and above all he took the daughter 2 of the Bedara he killed 


1 Nina Chatu or Nina Chetu was a great friend of the Portuguese, referred 
to with praise in all their chronicles. ‘A heathen merchant, who lived there 
[Malacca], a native of Kling, whom they called Nina Chetu, mitigated the evil 
treatment they [Rui de Araujo and his 1 8 Portuguese fellow prisoners] suffered, 
bribing the authors [of the treatment], and so gave them food and helped 
them as much as he could. ’ ‘And he was not deceived in his hope of reward 
from us, if he had such hope, because after the town was taken, Afonso 
de Albuquerque repaid his action with honour and favour he bestowed upon 
him, which were the cause of his voluntary death, (as we shall see later in its 
proper place).’ Barros, 11, vi, 3. See note p. 287. 

2 Tuan Fatimah, ‘a very pretty girl’, who had been married to her cousin 
Tuan Ali (Pires’ Tuam Aly), son of Sri Nara Diraja. When Sultan Mahmud 
went to the wedding he took a fancy to the beautiful bride, and ‘felt that a 
slight was put upon him by his bendahara showing openly that he was not 
wanted as son-in-law’. It seems that from this came the hatred of Mahmud 
for the Bendahara’s family. Cf. Winstedt, pp. 65-7. 



MALACCA 


259 

to be his wife, by whom he had a son. He took the property of 
all these people for himself, whereby he obtained a plenteous 
supply of gold. They say that through this deed he put a 
hundred and twenty beautiful women into his house and fifty 
quintals of gold and other valuables and great jewels, and they 
say that the dead did not deserve such a death, because such 
treachery had never been heard of. 

During this time — while the said king was making himself 
strong with strong palissades and many guns, because of their 
fear and trembling at what they had done to our Portuguese — 
he wanted to muster his people in all his kingdom and dominions 
with their mandarins and their officers | with their captains; and Fol. 171V. 
before we come to this it will be necessary to describe the city of 
Malacca and its boundaries and its kingdom, and then the places 
under its dominion, to show its greatness according to local 
standards, so that its destruction may be realised afterwards. 


[neighbouring lands] 

On the side of Upeh, which is over against Kedah, Malacca is Bounds of 
bounded by the Acoala Penajy 1 , a river which flows into the ^aia^a! 
sea — it is about four leagues from the fortress of Malacca to its 
mouth; and on the side of Iler z over against Muar it is bounded 
by the Kuala Kesang {Acoala Cagam ) 3 ; it is about three leagues 

1 Acoala Penajy must correspond to Kuala Lingi, the mouth of the Sungi 
Lingi ( kuala in Malay means mouth of a river) which forms part of the 
boundary between the State of Negri Sembilan and the Settlement of 
Malacca, seven miles east of Cape Rachado and approximately twenty-four 
miles from the town of Malacca — nearly double the four leagues indicated 
by Pires. Kuala Lingi is the first port of some consequence north-west of 
Malacca. On Eredia’s maps (fols. 11-12) Sungi Lingi is called Rio Panagrim. 
Immediately west of Kuala Lingi is Tanjong Panjang; Pires’ Acoala Penajy 
may mean ‘Kuala Panjang’. See plate XXIX. 

2 Eredia says that Yler was a village outside the walls of Malacca, ‘ on this 
side of the river [of Malacca] towards the south-east’ (fol. 6), and thus it 
appears on his plans of the town (fols. 8-9). It corresponds to the south-east 
part of the town of Malacca, called Banda Hilir today. 

3 Kuala Kesang forms the eastern boundary today between the Settlement 
of Malacca and the State of Johore. Eredia calls it ‘the beautiful ryo de 
Cassam of alligators and crocodiles’ (fol. 10), and has it on his maps as Casan. 
According to Eredia, in his time the Portuguese ‘District of Malacca’ ex- 
tended from Rio Panangim (Lingi) to a little east of Rio Muar, for a distance 



26 o 


TOM ^ PIRES 


Gardens 
there are 
zuithin these 
hounds of 
Malacca and 
what men-at- 
arms it had. 


Cinjojilm 1 . 


Klang 

(Clam) 2 . 


from the fortress to this boundary; and then going overland from 
one boundary to the other round the foot of the hill, which is 
called Gunong Ledang ( Golorn Leidani), which is the boundary 
on the land side, the said boundary of Malacca joins up and 
finishes, within which boundary there is a great deal of wood, 
most of it growing straight up to the sky, for masts and other 
things, and there are pleasant waters. 

Malacca has within its said limits one thousand one hundred 
and fifty farms which they call dufdes, some of them with palm 
groves, some with oraquas, some with fruits of various kinds, all 
good, including the fruit of the durians, which is the best fruit in 
the world without doubt. From the Acoala Penajy to the river 
of Muar along the sea, Malacca had a cate of men-at-arms who 
could fight, that is a hundred thousand men. These it had at the 
time when the Captain-major came to Malacca, when he took it. 
Within the bounds of Malacca are many wild elephants, and 
many tigers, and six or seven kinds of deer, [which look] like 
oxen but are not. 

The Kingdom of Malacca from Acoala Penajy to Kedah. All 
these are tin lands which they call timas. 

The first place is Cinyojum. It is governed by a mandarin. He 
used to pay the former king of Malacca four thousand calains a 
year, paid in Malacca. It is a place by a river which must have 
more than two hundred inhabitants; they are Malays. 

Another place of timas besides this is called Klang. It pays 
the same amount in Malacca, and the population is the same 
as in the other. They are Malays like the people of Cinjojuit. 

There is another place beyond this on another river, which is 
called Selangor ( Calamgor ). It pays six thousand calains a year to 
Malacca in timas. This is a bigger place with more people. They 
are Malays. 

of twelve leagues (thirty-eight miles) and penetrated inland eight leagues 
(twenty-five miles), with a circuit of twenty leagues (sixty-four miles). 
Actually there are approximately fifty miles between Kuala Lingi and 
Kuala Muar, along the coast, and Kuala Kesang is eighteen miles from 
Malacca — nearly double the three leagues indicated by Pires. In Pires’ 
time the boundaries of the Malacca territory were much as they are today. 

1 Sungi Jugra is the next large river between Kuala Lingi and Klang. 

2 Klang is a town not far from the mouth of the Klang River. R. de calan 
on Berthelot’s map of 1635. 



MALACCA 


26 l 

The other place is Bernam. It pays the same amount as Klang Bernam 
and Cinjojuu every year and it has twice as many inhabitants as (Ver- ^ 
the above. 

Another place is called Mjmjam. This has more tin than any Mimjam. 
of the others. It is larger than the above-mentioned. It used to 
pay Malacca every year eight thousand calains which are worth 
sixteen thousand, because these have twice the value. It has two 
villages: Mjmjam with Malays, and the other further up with 
Lufoes, and they are often at variance, and each place has its own 
jurisdiction, and it is so to this day. 

Another is Bruas. This has not so much tin, but it has more Bruas 
people and it is a trading place. It has a great many paraos and ( Baruaz )- 
people, and there are two villages on the Bruas River. This 
Bruas has plenty of rice. They are Malays. They pay six thou- 
sand timas to Malacca every year. The people in this place have 
more presumption than all the others put together. The captain 
here is Tuam Apem, mandarin of Malacca. 

The other village is called Perak. It used to pay four thousand Pol. 17 2r. 
timas a year to Malacca. The population is about the same as p k 
that of Klang. They are Malays also. (Pirac). 2 

The governors of these places are called mamdaliquas 3 , that is 
mamdaliqua of such and such a place. They have civil and 
criminal [jurisdiction] in their lands. The ordinary people 
always come to trade in Malacca in small paraos. They bring 
timas and rice, chickens, goats, figs, sugar cane, or aquas and things 
like that. The people in these places are poor. They live in this 
way, and the men of Aru attack them and sometimes carry them 
all off; and they always have palissades. 

The first place is Muar. This is the chief place after Malacca. Kingdom 
The town contains about two thousand men; it has a very good °[j a i acca 
river; it has beautiful farms, and it has enough rice for its own 0 n the 
needs. It has plenty of foodstuffs, many oracas. The people of Pahang 
Muar are knights; they have many mandarins. It is under the Slde ' 

1 Bernam River. Bernan on Berthelot’s map. 

2 Perak River. Pera on L. Homem’s map of 1554, D. Homem’s atlas of 
1558 and Dourado’s atlases. 

3 Perhaps from the Mai. mantdri (a counsellor, a minister of state), or from 
the Ar. makam (an appointed chief, resident, provincial governor) and malik 
(a king). 



262 


TOME PIRES 


The 

Fermoso 

River. 


Singapore 

(Singa- 

pura) 1 . 


Rokan 

(Jrcaao). 


Rupat. 


Siak 

(Qiac). 


Purjm. 


jurisdiction of the Bemdara. It has paraos and a beautiful river- 
side with trees, and fish. It is a cool place. 

This Fremoso River is a much bigger river than the Muar; but it 
has not so many people. In some places it is thinly populated. 
There are many inlets into which ships can enter. It has 
beautiful wood, many on aquas, fruits, any amount of fish. They 
say that this place belongs to the kings of Kampar by ancient 
agreements. 

Beyond is the Sijtngapura channel. It has a few C elate villages; 
it is nothing much. From there onwards the said kingdom does 
not extend any farther on land. This canal is a thing of little 
importance — I mean the people who live there. 

The kingdom of Malacca described so far all lies in the land of 
Siam. Now we will tell of the seignories which obey Malacca; 
some of them pay tribute and some supply men. We begin in the 
island of Sumatra, along the coast on the way to Palembang. 

Rokan is a country near Aru. It used to be subject to the king 
of Aru, and now it belongs to Malacca. It is a kingdom and has a 
king. He does not pay tribute, but is only obliged to help with 
men in time of war, without payment. 

Rupat is a place beyond this, going straight along. The lord of 
it is a mandarin. He is obedient to the said king of Malacca in 
the same way as Rokan above. 

Siak is a kingdom; it has a king. It is a small country. It is also 
obedient to the king of Malacca. In these countries they live by 
agriculture; they are not traders. They come to Malacca to buy 
cloth, and [people] from Malacca go to sell it [to Siak]. They 
bring gold in exchange. 

Purjm is almost entirely a country of Celates. The sheik of it is 
obedient to the said king of Malacca. This place has more 
paraos, and these men in this place are robbers. The robbers 
come to make a fair of the things they steal. Rowers go from 
here to Malacca. There are very large quantities of shad in this 

1 This is the first time the name is spelt as it still is in Portuguese today — 
Singapura. The first two European documents, earlier than, or contem- 
porary with, the present one, where Singapore is mentioned, are Rodrigues’ 
map (fol. 34), which records samgepura, and the letter written from Malacca 
on 22 Feb. 1513 by F. Peres de Andrade to Afonso de Albuquerque, which 
thrice mentions singapur. Cartas, in 51-65. 



MALACCA 263 

place — more than in Azamor. And their roes come to Malacca in 
great quantities. 

The kingdom of Kampar is strong. The land is very sterile Kampar 
and poor. It has gold; it has apothecary’s lignaloes; it has a great ( Cam P ar )* 
deal of pitch, honey, wax; it has enough rice for the inhabitants. 

This king of Kampar is descended from Raja Pute. He and the 
king of Malacca are first cousins; they are closely allied. This 
king used to pay the king of Malacca four cates of gold, all four 
of which are worth six contos and twenty-five cruzados. 

The kingdom of Indragiri is like that of Kampar. It has more Fol. 172V. 
merchants; it has more gold than Kampar. He is also related to 
the said king of Malacca like the king of Kampar, and also to the (Amdar- 
king of Kampar. He has the same merchandise in his country as guerj). 
there is in Kampar, because it is all one country, which is called 
Menangkabau ( Menamcabo ). Although there is a king of Men- 
angkabau, the whole of this country is called thus. This country 
has better gold than there is here. The king of Indragiri is more 
accessible for trade, because he has a better river-mouth. Junks 
can enter into it. He pays four cates of gold a year to the said 
king of Malacca. 

Pahang ( Pahaao ) is in the land of Siam. This [king] is also Pahang 
closely related to the king of Malacca, and to the kings of Kam- ( Paham °)* 
par and Indragiri. This king has the same merchandise in his 
country as the others have; and he has gold in good quantity, 
which is called Pahang [gold]. It is in dust and of less value than 
that from Menangkabau. The king of Pahang ( Paao ) is a greater 
king than any of these, and he holds the king of Trengganu 
( Talimgano ) as tributary to Pahang (Paao), and Pahang is tribu- 
tary to the kingdom of Malacca to the extent of another four 
cates of gold a year. This [country] produces alum and sulphur 
in addition to the other merchandise. It has a good city. It is 
always at war with the people of Siam. Pahang ( Pahao ) has 
mandarins and fighting men. It is a country which breeds 
warlike men. It trades in merchandise; there are more merchants 
in this country than in Indragiri. Its port is good, and its people 
are accustomed to trade. 

The land of Tongkal ( Tucall ) is beyond Indragiri, on the sea- 
coast. It has a sheikh. It is obedient to Malacca; it helps with ' u u 



TOME PIRES 


264 

men. It is a gold-producing country. It has the same merchan- 
dise as Indragiri. It is a small affair. It is not obedient to anyone 
else except Malacca. They are good men on the sea; they have 
small paraos. 

Linga Linga consists of four large islands which are opposite to 

(Limgua). Tongkal, almost opposite the first land of Palembang ( Palim - 
bao). It has a king; he is called Raja Limgua. He must have forty 
paraos and lancharas. They are a more warlike people than any 
of the others in Malacca, or in its kingdoms and dominions. It is 
from here that the cabaes come, as will be described when we 
speak of this. This Raja Limga is greatly beloved by the Celates. 

Celates. Celates are thieving corsairs who go to sea in small paraos 
robbing where they can. They are obedient to Malacca. They 
make Bintang [ Bimtam ] their headquarters. These men serve as 
rowers when they are required by the king of Malacca, without 
payment, just for their food, and the governor of Bintang brings 
them when they have to serve for certain months of the year. 


[native administration] 


Officials 
of the 
king of 
Malacca. 


Bem- 

dara 1 . 


Lasa- 

mana. 


The kings of Malacca sometimes create captains-general, 
whom they call Paduca Raja. These are a kind of viceroy, who 
is next to the king. To this man all the mandarins do reverence, 
and the Bemdara and Lasamana do the same to this Paduca Raja. 

When there is no aforesaid official, the Bemdara is the highest 
in the kingdom. The Bemdara is a kind of chief-justice in all 
civil and criminal affairs. He also has charge of the king’s 
revenue. He can order any person to be put to death, of whatever 
rank and condition, whether nobleman or foreigner; but first of 
all he informs the king, and both decide the matter in consulta- 
tion with the Lasamana and the Tumunguo. 

The Lasemana is a kind of admiral. He is the chief of all the 
fleet at sea. Everybody at sea, and junks and lancharas are under 
this man’s jurisdiction. He is the king’s guard. Every knight 


1 This is the first European description of the Malacca high officials, 
Bendahara, Laksamana, Temenggong and Xabandar. See Hobson-Jobson, s.v. 
Bendara, Laximana, Toomongong and Shabunder; Dalgado, s.v. Bendara, 
Lassamane, Tamungo and Xabandar; also the note on Paduca Raja, p. 244. 



MALACCA 


265 

[and] mandarin is under his orders. He is almost as important as 
the Bemdara — in war matters he is much more important and 
more feared. 

Tumungo is the chief magistrate in the city. He has charge of Tumun- 
the guard and has many people under his jurisdiction. All prison go * 
cases go first to him and from him to the Bemdara, | and this FoI. 1737. 
office always falls to persons of great esteem. He is also the one 
who receives the dues on the merchandise. 

There are in Malacca four Xabamdares, which are municipal Xabam- 
offices. They are the men who receive the captains of the junks, dares - 
each one according as he is under his jurisdiction. These men 
present them to the Bemdara, allot them warehouses, dispatch 
their merchandise, provide them with lodging if they have 
documents, and give orders for the elephants. There is a 
Xabamdar for the Gujaratees, the most important of all; there is a 
Xabamdar for the Bunuaqujlim, Bengalees, Pegus, Pase; there is 
a Xabamdar for the Javanese, Moluccans, Banda, Palembang, 
Tamjompura and Lugoes\ there is a Xabamdar for the Chinese, 

Lequeos, Chancheo and Champa. Each man applies to [the 
Xabamdar] of his nation when he comes to Malacca with mer- 
chandise or messages. 

The rule in Malacca is that if the king has an elder son by his Manner 
wife, he marries him at fifteen years of age or later; and if the °f succes- 
said son has a son or daughter by his wife, so that the king has a ^nglof 16 
grandson, he relinquishes the government and the son remains Malacca. 
in possession of the kingdom, and the father no longer is king. 

However he is respected as before, though he does not govern. 

No one but he may wear yj^ffow) under pain of death. And if he The 
proposes to go out and tb- wear anoffier colour, “Ke’orders the king’s 
colour to be proclaimed, and no one may go out in such colour 
under pain of death. He may go out in staje three or four times a matter of 
year for all to see him. If he goes by land the elephant is covered dressing 
up to the eyes in yellow c loth, and if he takes [another] king a ^ 8(nri8 
with him he rides on the neck, and he himself goes in the middle, 
and his page on the haunches. No one may wear a Chinese hat 
except himself. 

When he goes in a parao or lanchara it carries four white poles 
seven or eight fathoms long, two at the poop and two at the by sea. 



266 


TOME PIRES 


Cabaa- 

ees 2 . 


Amoks. 


Justice in 
Malacca. 


prow. These poles are called guallas r . The Lasatnana may have 
one of these poles at the prow; any other king may have two, one 
at the poop and another at the prow, and this is the greatest 
honour there is amongst them. And this rule cannot be broken 
amongst the Malays. And on matters of this kind they will kill 
each other sooner than on any others. These poles are raised 
upright, just white, without anything else. 

The cabaees are noblemen. They have given everyone to 
understand that they cannot die by the sword. The cabaees are 
men who carry a round piece of steel and other metals as big as 
chickpeas on the thick of the right arm, and when they receive 
it they swear to die like knights. There are few cabaees, and they 
are much feared. The land where the best cabaees come from are 
the islands of Linga, and next to these [come those] from Brunei 
(Burnee) and Pahang, and those from Malacca are not so good. 

The amoks are knights among them, men who resolve to die, 
and who go ahead with this resolution and die. This resolution 
is called amucks ( amoquos ) 3 . There are many of these people in 
Malacca and throughout all these parts. They cannot become 
such, without much wine first. Of these we will speak when we 
describe Java, because the chief amoks come from there. 

When some mandarin is condemned to death, they go to his 
house and say: ‘You are to die’. And his nearest relative kills him 
with the kris. The condemned man washes himself first and says 
his prayers, then they give him the cirj, which is how they call 
the betel , 4 and so he dies; or if he is a prisoner, this is the most 
honourable death. And if he is a commoner they take him into 
the street and order him to be killed, or impaled, or burnt alive, 
or beaten on the chest to death, according to the nature of the 
crime. And the .estate of all these people goes to the king if they 

1 Mai. galah, ‘a pole, long staff, setting pole, boat-hook’. Marsden, 
Dictionary, s.v. 

2 Mai. kabal, ‘invulnerable, ... a charm worn to render the person invul- 
nerable’. Marsden, Dictionary, s.v. The Comentdrios (in, xv) and Barros 
(ii, vi, 2), however, say that cabal was the name of an animal of Siam or Java, 
the bones of which had the virtue of preventing a man’s blood from running 
from a wound. 

3 Again, this is the first record in any language of the word amoquo or 
amoco (amuck), and the first description of what the word implies. See p. 176. 

4 Sirih is the Malay word for betel. Marsden, Dictionary, s.v. 



MALACCA 


267 


have no heir in the direct line, and if they have one he takes the 
half. 

When some person or merchant dies without an heir in the 
direct line, the king takes his estate; and if the dead man has 
made an heir, then they divide the estate between them. First 
however they pay out the alms and the funeral expenses from the 
total amount, and any debts the dead man owed are paid off. 

If they are important people they do not marry without first 
informing the Bemdara. If the marriage is between merchants 
the husband must bring as much as the wife; and this is among 
the Klings who marry when young. And if it is between Moors 
the man must give the woman ten taels and six mazes of gold as 
dowry, which must always be actually in her power. And if the 
husband wishes to leave her, the said dowry and the clothes 
remain in her possession, and each of them may marry whom- 
soever he pleases. And if the wife makes a journey by sea with 
her husband, then she hands over the money to the husband, 
and if they part from there, in that case the husband returns the 
ten taels and the profit on therm 

If some man commits adultery, and if the husband can kill 
both the lover and his own wife in his house, he is free and goes 
unpunished if he kills one and the other. And if someone has 
fled and he has killed him outside, coming from his house, he 
is liable to the death penalty; he can only apprehend him, and 
thereafter he cannot live with his wife if he accuses the other man. 


Fol. 173V. 

What the 
king in- 
herits 
when one 
of his sub- 
jects dies. 

Wedding 

customs. 


The 

custom 

about 

adultery. 


When some man injures another, or a woman, half the fine 
goes to the king and half to the complainant. They cannot 
demand justice without the complainant takes something to the 
judge) according to the nature of what is demanded. From this 
tfaeoemdaras are very rich. 

Every mandarin when he goes to see the king approaches no 
nearer than ten paces and raises both his hands three times 
above his head, and then he kisses the ground and says through 
third persons what he wants; and the same on taking leave. And 
this is on the days when they know that the king can be seen by 
them. And they do the same to the prince. All show great 
respect for the king and for what belongs to him, and the people 
when they pass by the king’s houses do reverence to them. 


The 

custom 

about 

injury. 


The 
custom 
the man- 
darins 
observe 
when they 
speak to 
the king. 



268 


TOM li PIRES 


The 

custom 

about 

sitting 

down. 


The 

custom 

about 

their 

wives. 


Who the 
people 
are who 
traded in 
Malacca 
and from 
what 
parts. 

Fol. I74r, 


On account of the seats, when a mandarin speaks with another 
he does not sit down, but remains standing, unless the seats are 
on the same level, such as a bench or one storied house ( ?). When 
they greet each other they shut the left hand with the thumb 
stretched out and the right hand on the left, and thus they speak 
out of courtesy. All have houses with rooms on a lower level for 
the servants, so that they should not be so high as their masters 
when they speak to them. You must never raise your hand above 
the navel with a Malayan; it is a great courtesy. We will talk of 
this when dealing with the things of Java, because they took this 
custom from there. 

The Malayans are jealous people, and so you shall never see 
the wives of the important people in the land, nor do they go 
out, except sometimes; if they are entitled to do so, they go out 
in covered sedan chairs, and many women together, and this 
occasionally. Each man has one or two wives, and as many 
concubines as he likes; they live together peaceably. And the 
country observes this custom: heathens marry with Moorish 
women and a Moor with a heathen woman with their [proper] 
ceremonies; and in their feasts and rejoicing they take too much 
wine. Both men and women are fond of mimes after the fashion 
of Java. 

[trade] 

Moors from Cairo, Mecca, Aden, Abyssinians, men of Kilwa, 
Malindi, Ormuz, Parsees, Rumes, Turks, Turkomans, Christian 
Armenians, Gujaratees, men of Chaul, Dabhol, Goa, of the 
kingdom of Deccan, Malabars and Klings, merchants from 
Orissa, Ceylon, Bengal, | Arakan, Pegu, Siamese, men of Kedah, 
Malays, men of Pahang, Patani, Cambodia, Champa , Cochin 
China, Chinese, Lequeos, men of Brunei, Lufoes, men of Tam- 
jompura, Laue, Banka, Linga (they have a thousand other 
islands), Moluccas, Banda, Bima, Timor, Madura, Java, Sunda, 
Palembang, Jambi, Tongkal, Indragiri, Kappatta, Menang- 
kabau, Siak, Arqua ( Arcatl ), Aru, Bata , country of the Tomjano, 
Pase, Pedir, Maldives. 

Besides a great number of islands [there are] other regions 
from which come many slaves and much rice. They are not 



MALACCA 


places of much trade and therefore no mention is made of them, 
only of the above-mentioned peoples who come to Malacca with 
junks, pangajavas and ships; and in cases where they do not 
come to Malacca, people go there from here, as will be said in 
detail under the title of each [region]. Finally, in the port of 
Malacca very often eighty-four languages have been found 
spoken, every one distinct, as the inhabitants of Malacca affirm; 
and this in Malacca alone, because in the archipelago which 
begins at Singapore and Karimun up to the Moluccas, there are 
forty known languages, for the islands are countless. 

Because those from Cairo and Mecca and Aden cannot reach 
Malacca in a single monsoon, as well as the Parsees and those First of 
from Ormuz, and Rumes , Turks and similar peoples such as the Gu ~ 

* ' 1 A jaratees 

Armenians, at their own time they go to the kingdom of Gujarat, an d the 
bringing large quantities of valuable merchandise; and they go merchants 
to the kingdom of Gujarat to take up their companies in the said 
ships of that land, and they take the said companies in large ca i n t heir 
numbers. They also take from the said kingdoms to Cambay, ships. 
merchandise of value in Gujarat, from which they make much 
profit. Those from Cairo take their merchandise to Tor, and 
from Tor to Jidda, and from Jidda to Aden, and from Aden to 
Cambay, where they sell in the land things which are valued 
there, and the others they bring to Malacca, sharing as aforesaid. 

Those from Cairo bring the merchandise brought by the 
galleasses of Venice, to wit, many arms, scarlet-in-grain, Merchan- 
coloured woollen cloths, coral, copper, quicksilver, vermilion, by 

nails, silver, glass and other beads, and golden glassware. those from 

Those from Mecca bring a great quantity of opium, rose- Cairo, 
water and such like merchandise, and much liquid storax. Afecca^ 

Those from Aden bring to Gujarat a great quantity of opium, 
raisins, madder, indigo, rosewater, silver, seed-pearls, and other 
dyes, which are of value in Cambay. 

In these companies go Parsees, Turks, Turkomans and Armen- 
ians, and they come and take up their companies for their 
cargo in Gujarat, and from there they embark in March and 
sail direct for Malacca; and on the return journey they call at the 
Maidive Islands. 

Four ships come every year from Gujarat to Malacca. The 



TOME PIRES 


270 

merchandise of each ship is worth fifteen, twenty, or thirty 
thousand cruzados, nothing less than fifteen thousand. And from 
the city of Cambay one ship comes every year; this is worth 
seventy or eighty thousand cruzados, without any doubt. 

The merchandise they bring is cloths of thirty kinds, which 
are of value in these parts; they also bring pachak, which is a 
root like rampion, and catechu, which looks like earth; they 
bring rosewater and opium; from Cambay and Aden they bring 
seeds, grains, tapestries and much incense; they bring forty 
kinds of merchandise. The kingdom of Cambay and that of 
Deccan as far as Honawar are called First India, and so each of 
these kings calls himself in his titles ‘King of India’. They are 
both powerful, with large forces of horse and foot. For the last 
300 years these two kingdoms have had Moorish kings. The 
kingdom of Cambay is superior to that of Deccan in everything. 

The principal merchandise brought back is cloves, mace, 
Fol. 174V. nutmeg, sandalwood, seed-pearls, some porcelain, a little musk; 

they carry enormous quantities of apothecary’s lignaloes, and 
finally some benzoin, for they load up with these spices, and 
of the rest they take a moderate amount. And besides they take 
gold, enormous quantities of white silk, tin, much white damask 
— they take great pains to get this — coloured silks, birds from 
Banda for plumes for the Rumes, Turks and Arabs, which are 
much prized there. These have the main Malacca trade. They pay 
in dues six per cent; and if they will have their ships assessed by 
valuers, they pay on their valuation. This is the custom with the 
Gujaratees, in order to avoid extortions by the mandarins; for be- 
sides the six per cent, they pay th eBemdara, Lasamane, Tumunguo 
and Xabamdar one cloth per hundred, and each one according to 
who he is, which the merchants regard as a great oppression, 
and therefore they have the ship valued; at the lowest a Gujarat 
ship is valued at seven cates of timas 1 , which is twenty-one thou- 
sand cruzados, and on this they pay at the rate of six per cent. 

Those from Chaul, Dabhol and Goa come and take up their 

1 This should read ‘seven cates of calains in timas ’ or 700,000 calains, as one 
cate is 100,000, and 100 calains were worth three cruzados-, or else, ‘seventy 
cates of timas’, or 70,000,000 timas, as 100 timas cashes made one calaim. See 
pp. 260, 275. Thus 69 lbs. (or 33.3 calains, at Pires’ estimate) of tin were 
worth one cruzado, or about £2 17s. at the modern value of the old cruzado. 



MALACCA 


271 


companies in Bengal, and from there they come to Malacca; and 
they also take them up at Calicut. 

Of these we shall speak when we speak of the things of Bengal. 

These Malabares form their company in Bonuaquelim, that is Canna- 
Choromandel and Pulicat, and they come in companies; but the 
name is Klings and not Malabars. Choromandel, and Pulicat, Cochin 
and Nagor. These are ports of the coast of Choromandel: the andKol- 
first is Caile, and Kilakari ( Calicate ), Adirampatnam ( Adaram - 
patana ), Nagore ( Naor ), Tirumalarajanpatnam ( Turjmalapatam ) peo pleare 
Karikal ( Carecall ), Tranquebar ( Teregamparj ), Tirmelwassel called 
( Tirjmalacha ), Calaparaoo, Pondicherry ( Conjmjrj ), Pulicat ^ a ' 
(Paleacate) 1 . 

1 Pires’ Choromandel goes here from Caile (8° 40' N) to Pulicat (1 3 0 25' N); 
but in his letter of 27 Jan. 1516, Choromandel is from the shoals of Child to 
Pondicherry ( Cunjmeyra ). The modern ‘Coast of Choromandel’ runs from 
Calimere Point (io° 18') to Goddvari Point (16° 58') according to the 
Admiralty Pilot. All the sixteenth-century Portuguese chronicles, rutters and 
maps give different limits for the Choromandel coast and mention different 
place-names on it. See note p. 64. Caile or Qatte, as spelt before, corresponds 
to Old Kayal, a place which has now disappeared, among the lagoons of the 
delta of the Tambraparni River. See note p. 81. Calicate corresponds to 
Kilakari (9 0 15'). It is called Calecare by Barros (1, ix, 1), and appears as o 
calecare in D. Homem’s atlas of 1558 and as calocare in Dourado’s atlas of 
1571. ‘Calecare lies in degrees’ says the rutter in Livro de Marinharia, 
p. 225. Adarampatana corresponds to Adirampatnam (io° 18'), which ‘is 
considered a port of refuge for native vessels between the months of May and 
September’, according to the Bay of Bengal Pilot. Naor corresponds to 
Nagore. See note p. 92. Turjmalapatam corresponds to Tirumalarajan- 
patnam (io° 53'). Called Triminapatam by Barros; appears as tamala in D. 

Homem’s atlas and as tremapatao in the atlas of c. 1615-23. Carecall is 
Karikal (io° 55'). Called Chereacalle by Barros, and Quilicare by Barbosa; 
appears as calecam on L. Homem’s map of 1554, and as caleca in D. Homem’s 
atlas of 1558. Tereganparj corresponds to Tranquebar, or Tarangampadi in 
the vernacular, (n° 2'); it is called Tragambar by Barros. Tirjmalacha 
corresponds to Tirmelwassel (n“ 13’), as spelt in the Admiralty’s Pilot and 
chart, or Tirumullaivasal, as spelt on the ‘i-inch to a mile map of India’. 

This difference in two modem and authoritative spellings helps us to under- 
stand the sometimes surprisingly wild spelling used by Pires (which more- 
over we know only through his transcriber) and other early writers and 
cartographers. Tirjmalacha must be what Barros calls Triminavaz and what 
appears as trimalauas in Dourado’s atlas of 1571. The rutter says that ‘from 
Negapatam to the shoals of Trimanava there are 12 leagues and it has a large 
river’, which must be the Coleroon River, the largest and northernmost 
branch of the Cauvarey. Calaparaoo — Perhaps Cuddalore (1 1° 43'), which is 
called Calapate by Barros and Kadaldr in the Mohit. Conjmjrj, which Pires 
calls Cunjmeyra in his letter of 27 Jan. 1516, corresponds to Pondicherry 



272 


TOM ^ PIRES 


The Malabars come to Pulicat to take their companies. They 
bring merchandise from Gujarat, and those from Choromandel 
bring coarse Kling cloth. There come every year to Malacca 
three or four ships, each one must be worth twelve to fifteen 
thousand cruzados; and from Pulicat come one or two ships, 
each worth eighty or ninety thousand cruzados, or a junk worth 
no less. They bring thirty kinds of cloths, rich cloths of great 
value. They pay in Malacca six per cent. These Klings have all 
the merchandise and more of the Malacca trade than any other 
nation. 

Return The principal thing they take back is white sandalwoods, 
front^ ^ because the red ones grow in Bonuaquelim; and a bahar is worth 
Malacca one an< 3 a half cruzados; and there will be some ten ships each 
to Bonua- year if necessary. And they take camphor from Pansur, which is 
quelim. t0 ^ sou th-west, and in the island of Sumatra it is not worth so 
much; this is edible. [They also take] alum, white silk, seed- 
pearls, pepper, a little nutmeg, a little mace and a little cloves, 
much copper, little tin ,fruseleira of the lowest quality, calambac, 
damasks, Chinese brocades, and gold. They pay six per cent 
entry-dues and nothing on coming away. They leave here in 
January and come back in October. They take a month to go and 
another to come back; and sometimes they go from here to 
Pulicat in Malacca junks. And the Klings are from the kingdom 
of Narsinga. They are heathens. 

Dues paid As the account and description of the lands has been given 
Malacca above, it now remains to speak of the dues which the merchants 
on mer- from the west paid in Malacca when they came with their mer- 
chandise chandise, to wit, merchants from Aden, and along with those 
^West^ fr° m Aden, those from Mecca and Ormuz; Parsees, and with 
them all Gujarat, Chaul, Dabhol, the kingdom of Goa and 
Calicut, the kingdom of Malabar, Ceylon, Caile, Choromandel, 

(n° 56')- Tomaschek ( Mohit , Tafel XVIII) gives Conijmie as a Portuguese 
name corresponding to Conhomeira, a place-name found in many early 
Portuguese maps and situated by Barros between Calapate and «S. Thome or 
Maliapor (Mailapur, practically a southern suburb of Madras). The rutter 
says that from Sam Thome to Conhomeira there will be about twenty-five 
leagues (eighty miles), which is exactly the distance between Pondicherry and 
Madras. Pires’ Conjmjrj or Cunjmeyra may be the Conymate (?) mentioned by 
Gaspar da India in a letter written from Cochin on 16 Nov. 1506 to the King 
of Portugal. Cartas de Afonso de Albuquerque, 11, 377-8. 



MALACCA 


273 


Pulicat, all the kingdom of the Klings, which is Narsinga, the 
kingdom of Orissa, Bengal, Arakan, Pegu, Siam. Pegu and 
Siam paid dues on the merchandise, and a present on the pro- 
visions: all provisions in all these lands, on the side of Tenas- 
serim, Kedah, Pedir, Pase, are a matter of a present. These are 
called of the west. These all pay six per cent in Malacca. And 
without these companies | there come merchants, Malayans or Fel. i75r. 
from other nations, who have their wives and settle in Malacca. 

They pay three per cent, and besides this a royal due of six per 
cent in the case of a foreigner, and three in the case of a native. 

A present is paid to the king, and the Bemdara, and the Tumun- 
guo, and the Xabandar of the nation in question, and these 
presents will amount to one or two per cent. According as the 
Xabandar decides, so the merchants pay, because the xabandares 
are sympathetic to the merchants and of the same nations as the 
merchants; and sometimes they give more, according as the 
xabandares wish to be on good terms with the king and the 
mandarins. And this done, they sell their goods freely. 

They have also another way with the big ships. Sometimes Another 
with the consent of the king they [make] valuations. It is known v ^ y ^ g 
that a ship from such and such a place is bringing merchandise dues. 
worth so much. They call together ten merchants, five Klings 
and five from some other nation, and before the Customs Judge, 
who was the Tumungam , the Bemdara 1 s brother, they make the 
valuation and receive the dues and presents. Because if this was 
not done, each one would take his pickings. And the trade is 
so great that the guards steal, and to avoid theft and oppres- 
sion, this was done. And also it was found that the valuers 
were heavily bribed; and through this system people rarely 
dared [to behave in that way]. 

It is an old custom in Malacca that as soon as the merchants How 
arrive they unload their cargo and pay their dues or presents, as P rices 
will be said. Ten or twenty merchants gathered together with {n 
the owner of the said merchandise and bid for it, and by the said Malacca. 
merchants the price was fixed and divided amongst them all in 
proportion. And because time was short and the merchandise 
considerable, the merchants were cleared, and then those of 
Malacca took the merchandise to their ships and sold them at 



TOM li PIRES 


Lands 
that pay 
presents 
only and 
no other 
dues. 


Land 

dues. 


274 

their pleasure; from which the traders received their settlement 
and gains, and the local merchants made their profits. And 
through this custom the land lived in an orderly way, and they 
carried on their business. And that was done thus orderly, so 
that they did not favour the merchant from the ship, nor did he 
go away displeased; for the law and the prices of merchandise in 
Malacca are well known. 

The entire East does not pay dues on merchandise, but only 
presents to the king and to the persons mentioned above — [the 
entire East,] to wit, Pahang and all the places as far as China, all 
the islands, Java, Banda, Moluccas, Palembang, and all [places] 
in the island of Sumatra. The presents are a reasonable amount, 
something like dues. There were taxing officials who made the 
estimation. This was the general custom, but the presents from 
China were larger than from all other parts. And these presents 
amount to a great deal because the number of sea-traders who 
paid presents is considerable. And if they sold junks in Malacca, 
the dues paid were two or three tundaias of gold per hull; and 
this goes to the king of Malacca. And afterwards it was decreed 
that on each 300 cruzados 1 5 should be paid in dues, and this the 
xabandares of the different nations collected for the king. All 
provisions pay presents and not dues. 

No man can sell a house or a garden without the licence of the 
king of the land or the Bemdara\ for the licence for the sale of the 
garden and the said house adjoining (?) a present was paid 
accordingly. Malacca also had so much per month from the 
women street-sellers, and this was given to the mandarins, for 
the streets assigned to one mandarin so much, and so much to 
another, because in Malacca they sell in every street. And this 
was [for] the poor people’s hospital. And as a great favour an 
inhabitant was allowed to have in front of his door a stall for 
selling or hiring. They also have dues from the fruit and fish; 
this was a trifle. Besides the [other] dues, the principal due it had 
is on the weighing of all merchandise that came in or went out: 
one calaim was paid on each hundred the merchandise was 
worth. And for this the king has secretaries and receivers; and 
everything was weighed, even tar-lamps, and this amounted to a 
good deal at the time in question. 



MALACCA 


275 


The Malacca coinage was made of calains in timas — timas Fol. 175-0. 
means tin. The small tin coins are cashes. A hundred were worth Malacca 
eleven reis and four ceitis, at the rate of a hundred calains in 
timas for three cruzados. Every hundred cashes make one calaim vaiue 0 j 
and weigh barely thirty-three ounces. And all the merchandise is the tymas, 
sold by calains , and they pay in tin or in gold. The cashes are like 
ceitis, with the name of the reigning king, and those of the late silver. 
kings are also current. The tin pieces are eighty. And a hundred 
calains are worth three cruzados. 

Malacca has xerafins from Cambay and from Ormuz; they Xarafins. 
circulate as well as our cruzado. Each xerafim is worth twenty- Cruzados, 
seven calains, which make 320 reis. The cruzado is worth thirty- 
three and a third at the rate of three per hundred calains. Pase 
dramas and silver coins circulate. 

The lowest quality gold that comes to Malacca is that from 
Brunei, which is of four and a half, five, five and a half, and six & 
mates, and next that of Laue, which is of seven and seven and a 
half mates-, and next that from Java, of eight and eight and a 
half mates, and that from Pahang ( Pahun ) is of this value and 
somewhat higher; and that from Menangkabau is of nine mates-, 
and that from the Klings is of nine and a third and nine and a 
half; so too is that from Cochin China: this is the best gold in 
these parts; it is gold [good] for cruzados, of nine and a half 
mates or more, almost two thirds. 

The Malacca weight is the tael, which is also called tumdaya. Tael or 
This tumdaia weighs sixteen mazes, each maz weighs four Tunda y a - 
cupoes, each cupom weighs twenty cumderis 1 . This tumdaya 
weighs, in our measure, eight and a half drams less six and a half 
grains. 

The value of the gold is according to the number of mates. Value of 

the gold. 

1 Referring to the measures and weights of Malacca, Nunes says: ‘The 
weight with which they weigh gold, musk, seed-pearls, coral, calambac, 
manicas [rubies or precious stones in general, from the Mai. manikam ] is the 
cate, which is 20 taels', each tael is 16 mazes, one maz is 20 cumduryns; and one 
paual is 4 mazes, one maz is 4 cupoes, one cupao is 4 cumduryns.' Lyvro dos 
Pesos, p. 39. There is an obvious mistake in Pires’ MS. It is possible that the 
transcriber left out a few words which would make the last part of the sen- 
tence read: ‘each cupom weighs five cumderis, and so each maz weighs twenty 
cumderis’. See Hobson- Jobson, s.v. Candareen; Dalgado, s.v. Cupao and 
Condorim. 



tom£ pires 


276 

The mate is worth twice its number in calains, so that gold of 
four mates is worth eight calains the maz, and that of four and a 
half mates is worth nine calains the maz , and that of five mates is 
worth ten calains the maz , and that of ten mates is worth twenty 
calains the maz. At this rate you calculate as follows: gold of 
eight mates is worth 16 calains the maz , [as the tael has sixteen 
mazes,] sixteen times 16 are 256 calains. The calculation is made 
at the rate of a hundred calains for three cruzados. 

The cate of the Malacca gold is worth twenty taels. You make 
your calculation: twenty times two hundred and fifty-six are five 
thousand one hundred and twenty, and in this way the value of 
the gold is reckoned. And there are assayers of gold appointed 
by the king. And the king had given this office to one who gave 
him yearly half a cate of gold. And he takes nothing from the 
king or mandarins for assaying gold, and he charged the people 
one calaim for each tael, that is eleven reis, besides what he 
gathered on the stone, which is almost another calaim, because 
they are rough stones well fitted for this plunder. And no one 
but this man could assay gold. And this is a good post in 
Malacca, and there is a lot in it, because it is one of great credit. 
Value of The silver of Pegu was worth a hundred calains the three 
the silver, iae i s , and silver of Siam and of China was formerly worth forty 
calains the tael, now things are worth somewhat more. Much 
silver used to come to Malacca. 

Weights of The Malacca tael or tumdaia was of eleven and a half drams; 
Malacca cate weighs twenty tundaias minus six and a half grains at the 
Times™ 61 ' a bove rate. The cate of gold is worth twenty-eight and a half 
ounces. Gold, silver, musk, edible camphor, calambac and seed- 
pearls are weighed by this cate. 

Cate for The cate for merchandise weighs twenty-three of the above 

merchan- men ^ onec j taels; it weighs thirty-two and three-quarter ounces 
and twenty-five grains. The Malacca farafola weighs ten of 
these cates 1 . With this cate, when you buy by the bahar, it comes 
to two-hundred cates in the case of the following merchandise, 


1 The Malacca f or a pola, then, weighed 20 lbs. 6 oz. 285 gr. (9,268 grammes). 
But the weight of the farapola varied locally through the whole East, from 
about 20 to about 30 lbs. See Hobson-Jobson, s.v. Frazala; Dalgado, s.v. 
Far^dla. 



MALACCA 


viz., musk in pods, white and coloured silk, opium, quicksilver, 
copper, vermilion, carnelians, and other merchandise of the kind. 
The bahar weighs in arrates of the old measure, three quintals, 
two arrobas , twenty arrates and six and a third ounces in goods 


measure 1 . 


And the law of Malacca as to the weight of the bahar in mer- Fol. ij6r. 
chandise of the following class [is] when you buy, the bahar Another 
must be two hundred and five cates : pepper, cloves, nutmeg, b a h a r. 
mace, benzoin, lac, incense, brazil, alum, myrobalans, sulphur, 
pachak and things of this kind. And this bahar, according to my 
calculation, as I have said, comes to this: they increase it by five 
cates , three quintals, three arrobas , seven arrates , nine ounces 
and thirty-three grains. This is the bahar after the law of 
Malacca, according to the calculation I made, and to the best of 
my ability. And so this dachytn was fixed. 

When the Governor of the Indies left Malacca, he ordered Bahar 
Rui de Araujo to assess the big dachim of the spice which re- °^i acca 
mained in the factory. It was determined in writing that the said factory, 
dachim weighed three quintals, three arrobas and six arrates of 
the old measure. And so the spice that was weighed is entered in 
the accounts. 

When I came to Malacca as secretary and accountant of the 


1 Barbosa says in his Book, ad finem: ‘The arratel, old weight, contains 14 
ounces. The arratel, new weight, contains 16 ounces. Eight old quintaes make 
seven new, and each new quintal contains 1 28 arrateis of 1 6 ounces. Each old 
quintal is 3% quarters of the new quintal, and is 128 arrateis of 14 ounces. A 
farazola contains 22 arrateis of 16 ounces, and 6J ounces over. Twenty fara- 
zolas make a bahar. A bahar is 4 old quintaes of Portugal. All the Drugs and 
Spices and everything else which comes from India is sold in Portugal by the 
old weight, while other goods are sold by the new weight.’ In the fifteenth 
century the weights in Portugal were divided as follows: The quintal con- 
tained 4 arrobas-, the arroba 16 libras-, the libra 2 arrateis-, the arratel one marco 
and 6 onfas (ounces), i.e., 14 onfas; the onga 8 oitavas (drams); the marco (used 
almost exclusively for precious metals), i.e., 8 onfas, contained 4608 graos 
(grains). But the value of some weights, mainly the arratel, varied according 
to the merchandise for which they were used, as still happens in Great 
Britain in some cases. King John II (1455-95) tried to standardize these 
weights, and King Manuel I (1469-1521) decreed, perhaps in 1499, that the 
new arratel should contain 2 mar cos or 16 onfas. This ‘new arrdtel’ corre- 
sponds to 459 grammes. The arroba is today reckoned in Portugal as equi- 
valent to 15 kg. Costa Lobo, Historia da Sociedade em Portugal no Seculo 
XV, pp. 244-55; F. A. Correa, Historia Economica de Portugal, I, 124-6. 



TOM li PIRES 


278 


Measure 
of the 
gamta for 
rice, oil, 
wines and 
vinegars. 


said factory, I decided to verify the dachim , and I did so thor- 
oughly, and I found that the said dachim weighed exactly three 
quintals, three arrobas and twenty-seven arrates of the old 
measure. Nobody would believe me. I strove so hard that they 
sent to Cochin to ask for the weight of the bahar in lead. They 
sent back word from Cochin that the said dachim , according to 
the Cochin measure, weighed exactly three quintals, three 
arrobas and twenty-six arrates. I am convinced that it was not 
well weighed. Now it is determined that this is its weight. I say 
this so as to be able to answer for it later in Cochin, and also 
because the King our lord lost twenty arrates in each bahar, in 
what was weighed, which was done at the rate of three quintals, 
three arrobas and six arrates. 

Because we have no measures, when I had to measure I 
weighed the rice contained in one gamta after the law of Malacca. 
I found that it weighed in rice exactly three arrates and ten 
ounces of the new measure. If over there you put this weight [of 
rice] in a vessel you will easily be able to measure its volume in 
oil or other liquid. 


[PORTUGUESE OCCUPATION] 

So far much has been said of the things of Malacca in the past, 
although in Malacca there is much more than has been said, 
because doubtless I am ignorant. About the trading in merchan- 
dise, . . - 1 this cannot help but be towards the end of the mon- 
soons and the beginning of others. Now I will tell how it was 
taken, and what happened up to the time of my departure for 
Cochin, and of the kings who are vassals here, and of other 
friends, and of the lands which traded here, and how the city is 
recovering and filling again with merchants, and from what parts 
they came to trade here after the taking of Malacca. 

Afonso de Albuquerque, Capitan-Major and Governor of the 
Indies, arrived at Malacca at the beginning of the month of July, 
in the year 151 1, with fifteen sail, great and small, in which came 


1 The complete lack of punctuation renders these sentences susceptible of 
several interpretations; it seems, moreover, that some words are missing here, 
possibly omitted by the transcriber. 



MALACCA 


279 


about sixteen hundred fighting men 1 . At this time it is said that 
Malacca had a hundred thousand men-at-arms, from Kuala 
Lingi (Coala Penagy ) to the hinterland (?) and Kasang ( Capam ), 
which are the limits of the city of Malacca. And the Malays had 
many strong palissades, and on the sea there were many lan- 
charas, and paraos in the river, and on the sea many junks and 
Gujarat ships which were ready to fight; because there was then 
in Malacca a captain from Gujarat who was working for war, as 
it seemed to him that he alone could cope with our ships and 
men, all the more because of the immense number of natives, 
though the natives did not back the king of Malacca; because in 
trading-lands, where the people are of different nations, these 
cannot love their king as do natives without admixture of other 
nations. This is generally the case; and therefore the king was 
disliked, though his mandarins fought, and that whenever they 
could. 

As soon as the said Captain-Major arrived with his fleet, he Fol. 176V. 
spent a few days sending messages of peace, trying as much as he 

1 Albuquerque arrived before Malacca on the xst July. In his letter of 
20 Aug. 1512, written from Cochin to the King of Portugal, he says that the 
fleet was composed of 17 ships, which he specifies; as one of the galleys was 
lost off Ceylon, according to his own statement, he arrived at Malacca with 16 
of the vessels with which he left Cochin. Cartas , 1, 67. The Comentarios say 
that Albuquerque left Cochin for Malacca with 18 sail (in, xiv); Barros 
(11, v, 9) and Gois (in, xvii) say 19 sail, and 1400 fighting men, 800 being 
Portuguese and 600 Malabars; Correia says 18 sail, with ‘about 600 fighting 
men and seamen, and valiant slaves, native sailors. . . .’ (n, 183); Castanheda 
mentions 18 sail with ‘800 Portuguese and 200 native foot-soldiers’ (hi, 1). 

All these chroniclers, with the exception of Correia, mention the galley lost 
off Ceylon. They say also that the fleet captured five Gujarat ships (four 
according to Correia) between Ceylon and Sumatra, and brought them with 
the fleet to Malacca (Correia says that two were burnt after being seized), as 
well as one or more junks taken between Sumatra and Malacca. Thus, 
Albuquerque arrived at Malacca with at least 16 of the ships with which he 
sailed from Cochin, plus about 4 to 8 other ships and junks seized on his way 
thither. It is not easy to explain, therefore, why Pires, who must have been 
well-informed, says that Albuquerque arrived at Malacca with 15 sail, great 
and small. As regards the number of fighting men, there is some variance 
between the chroniclers’ statements, though Barros, Gois and Castanheda 
agree that the Portuguese numbered 800 and the rest were natives. But in his 
letter to the chronicler Duarte Galvao, written from India in 1513, Albu- 
querque, when referring to the expedition to Malacca says: ‘We were in all 
seven hundred white men and three hundred Malabars; all the other men and 
captains remained in India.’ Cartas, 1, 397. 



280 


TOME PIRES 


could to avoid war. However, the levity of the Malayans, and the 
reckless vanity and arrogant advice of the Javanese, and the 
king’s presumption and obstinate, luxurious, tyrannical and 
haughty disposition — because our Lord had ordained that he 
should pay for the great treason he had committed against our 
people — all this together made him refuse the desire for peace. 
They only attempted to delay matters with Malayan messages, 
strengthening their position as much as they could, as it seemed 
to them that there was no people in the world powerful enough 
to destroy them. So the said Governor managed to get back Rui 
de Araujo and those who were prisoners with him. The king 
never wanted peace, against the advice of his Lasamane and 
the Bemdara and his Cerina De Raja that he should make peace; 
but following his own counsel and that of his son, whom he 
afterwards killed, and of Tuam Banda and Tuam Mafamut and 
Utamutarraja and his son Pate Acoo, and the Gujaratees, and 
Patifa and other young nobles who offered to run completely 
amok for the king, he would hear nothing of peace, the Kashises 
and their mollahs telling him that he should not make peace; for 
as India was already in the hands of the Portuguese, Malacca 
should not pass to the infidels. The king’s intention became 
known, and it was necessary that the said king should not 
go unpunished for what he did and for the evil counsel he 
took. 

The Governor, having taken counsel, landed with his men and 
took the city; and the king and his men fled. The Captain-Major 
returned to the ships that day, and did not allow the said king 
to be harmed, to see if he would desist from his obstinate inten- 
tention. The king was unwilling. Finally the said Governor 
landed again, determined now to take the city and no longer to 
be friends with the said king. He took the city and occupied it. 
The king of Malacca fled with his daughters and all his sons-in- 
law, kings of Kampar and Pahang. They went to Bretdo, which 
is the residence of the kings, and the Captain-Major took 
possession of the city. The city and the sea were cleared up, and 
authorities were appointed. 

The Captain-Major began to make a fortress of wood for want 
of stone and lime, and in the meantime order was given for the 



MALACCA 


28 l 


lime 1 ; then they began demolishing the wooden one, and they 
made the famous fortress in the place where it now is, on the site 
of the great mosque, strong, with two wells of fresh water in the 
towers, and two or three more in the bulwarks. On one side the 
sea washes against it, and on the other the river. The walls of the 
fortress are of great width; as for the keep, where they are 
usually built, you will find few of five storeys like this. The 
artillery, both large and small, fires on all sides. Meantime Ute- 
muta Raja, his son, son-in-law, and another relative, were be- 
headed because they were found engaged in Malayan intrigues 
and trying to darken the cloves. 

The king went from Bretam to Muar, and there he would 
have liked to kill king Audela of Kampar and his son-in-law; and 
the youth fled to Kampar, and as far as we know they- are no 
longer friends. The king went to the kingdom of Pahang, and 
there the king of Pahang’s son wanted to kill the ex-king of 
Malacca in order to seize the treasure he brought and still has. 
The king fled to Bintang where he still is. Let us pass over the 
fact that he was routed in Muar coming to Upeh, because many 
things of the kind happen in Malacca that are not written about. 

The land began welcoming merchants, and many came. The 
governorship of the Klings was given to the Bemdara Nina 
Chatu, with the office of Bemdara ; the governorship of the 
Lugoes, Parsees and Malays was given to Regimo de Raja , a Lugao 
Moor, who was given the office of Tumunguo; the governorship 

1 Correia (11, 250-1) says that Albuquerque ordered some junks of the 
Moors to be demolished, and with their wood and wooden casks filled up 
with earth a palissade was built, mounting many pieces of artillery. Then he 
immediately ordered the foundations of the fortress to be dug; for the con- 
struction of the fortress they found much stone and lime. Castanheda (m, lx) 
says also that Albuquerque ordered ‘a wooden fortress to be built where the 
mosque was, and inside this fortress, on the same day it was begun, he 
ordered foundations eight feet wide to be dug for the walls of another in 
masonry; and he wanted the wooden one to be built first because it would be 
finished sooner, than that of masonry’. The Comentdrios (ill, xxxi), however, 
inform us that Albuquerque ‘ordered the wooden fortress he had brought to 
be disembarked, in order to shelter the people who would work in the con- 
struction, and to prepare the lime and stone for [the building of] the fortress 
to begin’. According to the Comentdrios, Castanheda and Barros (11, vi, 6), 
Rui de Araujo had informed Albuquerque that there was neither stone nor 
lime in Malacca, but they found plenty of stone and masonry in some 
ancient sepulchres, and obtained lime from shells. 



282 


TOME PIRES 


of Her was given to Tuam Colaxcar; that of Upeh to Pate Quedir. 
Pate Quedir, a Javanese, rebelled with the help of Utamutaraja's 
Fol. i77r. money, and made the war in which several Portuguese died |, 
among them Rui de Araujo. Afterwards Pate Quedir was over- 
thrown and driven out; he fled and returned to Java and killed 
many Upeh merchants, robbing them of all they had. After this 
the country became quieter and began to settle down; many 
returned to people the land, and thenceforward it improved. 
Meantime Java gathered all its forces and came against Malacca 
with a hundred sail, among which were some forty junks and 
sixty lancharas and a hundred calaluzes , and they brought five 
thousand men 1 . Our ships went out to meet them, at which the 
Javanese were upset and withdrew with the tide, leaving every- 
thing and taking to the calaluzes. And they escaped in the large 
junk and two others. All the rest were burnt, and the people in 
them, and others were drowned, and others taken prisoners. 
And there is no doubt that this was the finest fleet the Portu- 
guese ever saw in India, or with so many important people; 
and they were still more heavily defeated, for which Our Lord 
be ever praised, for such a feat is not in our hands. And because 
Our Lord is not slow with His justice, the people of Java were 
tamed, and those of Palembang who came with Pate Unus killed, 
at which Guste Pate of Java and the lord of Tuban were not at all 
displeased. 

Tributary The kings of Pahang, Kampar and Indragiri, tributary vas- 
k theKing sa ^ friendly vassals, who write that they are slaves of the King 
our Lord, our Lord, the kings of Menangkabau, Aru, Pase and Pegu; 
and other friend, the king of Siam; the kings of the Moluccas count them- 

friendly 

vassals. 

1 The Comentarios say that Pate Unus ’ armada had ‘90 sail with about 
10,000 men (besides the big junks which he left in Muar River)’ (iv, xx); 
Correia refers to ‘Thirty big junks and sixty small ones, and other craft, in 
which he put 15,000 fighting men’ (11, 277); Castanheda says ‘300 sail, be- 
tween junks, lancharas and calaluzes, so full of people that it was a marvel to 
behold (in, c), and our men would be 300 at the most, and the enemy over 
25,000, the bravest and best armed and most determined there were from 
beyond the Cape of Good Hope to any of the four parts of the world’ (hi, ci); 
Barros refers to 90 sail, the larger part of which were small rowing vessels of 
every kind, and the rest junks . . . with about 12,000 men and much artillery, 
made in Java’ (11, ix, 6); Gdis says ‘about 300 sail, between junks, lancharas’ 
and rowing vessels, with many fighting men’ (in, xli). See note pp. 15 1-2. 



MALACCA 


selves as slaves, and so they have written, [as well as] the pates of 
Java, the lord[s] of Grisee (Aguacij), Tuban, Sidayu ( Cadao); 
the lord of Surabaya ( Curubaio ), friendly vassal, who counts 
himself as slave; the king of Sunda the same; [also] the Guste 
Pate of Java; and letters and ambassadors [come] daily from 
other kings and lords; the king of Brunei calls himself slave. 

Gujaratees have come, and Malabars, Klings, Bengalees, Pegus, ^ce* 
people from Pase and Aru, Javanese, Chinese, Menangkabaus, 
people from Tamjompura , Macassar, Brunei, and Lufdes. people 

Our ships [have been] to Java and Banda; a junk to China 1 , come to 
and Pase, and Pulicat. Now they go to Timor for sandalwood, 
and go to other parts. A junk of ours has already been to Pegu, our t i me% 
to the port of Martaban ( Martaniane ). p[aces 

Many Kling merchants; some Javanese, Parsees and Bengalees; our 
some from Pase and Pahang, Chinese and other nationalities; junks and 
Lufdes and people from Brunei. The people are very mixed and have 
are increasing. Malacca cannot help but return to what it was, Nationa[ _ 
and [become] even more prosperous, because it will have our 0 j 
merchandise; and they are much better pleased to trade with us merchants 
than with the Malays, because we show them greater truth and l ^ a i acca 
justice. 

Malacca is growing richer in junks; the Malacca merchants 
buy junks; they are rebuilding new godowns. The country is 
improving; they are beginning to pour in, and there is need for 
rule and ordinance at this outset, and permanent laws. A Solo- 
mon was needed to govern Malacca, and it deserves one. 

Java trade. The owner fits out his junk with everything that is The 
necessary. If you want a cabin ( peitaca ) 2 , or two, you set two or P r _ a ^ ce 
three men to look after and manage it, and note what you take; ° m &chants 

who have 

Inis refers to the voyage of Jorge Alvares to China in 1513, which is con- no junks 
firmed by other documents. Also in a letter of 7 Jan. 1514, written from and export 
Malacca to the King of Portugal, Pires says: ‘A junk of your Highness left in other 
here for China, in company with others which also go there to load; the people’s. 
merchandise, as well as the expenses which were incurred and are now being 
incurred, are shared equally between you and the Bemdara Nina Chatu\ we 
are expecting them back here within two or three months.’ Cartas, 111, go. 

This is an important point, for until recently it was thought that the voyage 
of Alvares with a junk to China did not take place till 1514. See note p. 1 20. 

2 Peitaca, from the Mai. Petak, ‘a division or partition (as in the hold of a 
vessel)’. Marsden, Dictionary, s.v. Dalgado, s.v. 



TOME PIRES 


Fol. 177V. 


Sunda. 


Tamjom- 

pura. 


Pase, 

Pedir, 

Kedah 

Siam, 

Pegu. 


Bengal, 

Pulicat. 


China. 


The share 
they kept 
for the 
king of 


284 

and when you come back to Malacca you pay twenty per cent on 
what you put in the junk in Malacca. And you, the owner of the 
merchandise, give a present on what you bring back. And if you 
loaded a hundred cruzados' worth in Malacca, when you get 
back you have two hundred before paying the owner of the junk. 

If I am a merchant in Malacca and give you, the owner of the 
junk, a hundred cruzados of merchandise at the price then ruling 
in Malacca, assuming the risk myself, on the return they give me 
a hundred and forty and nothing else; and the payment is made, 
according to the Malacca ordinance, forty-four days after the 
arrival of the junk in port. 

The voyage of Java is made at the beginning of January, in the 
first monsoon, and they come back from May onwards, up to 
August or September of the same year. 

For Sunda they give you fifty per cent, because they can bring 
black pepper and slaves. It is a land of merchandise and trade; 
the profit is greater. The voyage takes little time and is plain 
sailing. 

All four places here give you fifty per cent, the loader taking 
the sea risk. The voyages are all almost plain sailing. They pay 
in the manner aforesaid. 

These three places pay, according to the law of the land, 
thirty-five per cent the voyage. The sailing is safer and shorter. 

Siam and Pegu pay fifty per cent, the risk being as aforesaid. 
If you load merchandise on the return voyage, you get two for 
one, and after paying all dues there remains one for one and 
sometimes more. And they take eight or nine months on the 
journeys. 

These two places make the voyage year by year. These give 
one for one, according to the ordinance, or eighty or ninety per 
cent; and whoever loads up for these two places sometimes makes 
three for one. 

China is a profitable voyage, and moreover whoever loads up, 
hiring cabins ( peitacas ), sometimes makes three for one, and in 
good merchandise which is soon sold. 

And because this loading of the junks is a very profitable 
matter, as they sail in regular monsoons, the king of Malacca 
derived great profit from it. They gave the king one third [more] 



MALACCA 


285 

than they give to others, and the king made the man who dealt 
with his money exempt from dues, so that it was found that from “ iat 
this loading of the junks great store of gold was brought in, and loaded in 
it could not be otherwise. And here come the kings of Pahang, the junk. 
and Kampar, and Indragiri, and others, through their factors, to 
employ money in the said junks. This is very important for any- 
one with capital, because Malacca sends junks out, and others 
come in, and they are so numerous that the king could not help 
but be rich. And the said merchant who dealt with the king’s 
money had a share; he got pride and freedom, and they wel- 
comed him gladly and paid him in due time. For this the king 
had officials to receive the merchandise and grant the said rights, 
and this was attached to the custom-house, in charge of Ceryna 
De Raja, the Bemdara’s brother. 

If when the time is up the said merchant has no gold to pay Manner of 
with, he pays in merchandise according to the value in the P Q y ment - 
country; and when he pays in merchandise it is more profitable 
for one settled there. This is the custom if you have not con- 
tracted to be paid in gold. But the merchant prefers merchandise 
to gold, because from day to day the merchandise goes up in 
price, and because trade of every kind from all parts of the world 
is done in Malacca. 

And should anyone ask what advantage to his exchequer the 
King our Lord can derive from Malacca, there is no doubt that 
— once the influence is finished that this ex-king of Malacca 
still exercises, and also | once Java has been visited, to win the Fo1 - l l 8r - 
confidence of the merchants and navigators, and of the kings 
who still trust the false words of the king of Bintang, who does 
more mischief among relatives in one day than we can undo in a 
year — there is no doubt that Malacca is of such importance and 
profit that it seems to me it has no equal in the world. 

Anyone may note that if someone came to Malacca, capable of Reason 
sending each year a junk to China, and another to Bengal, and f° r the 
another to Pulicat, and another to Pegu, and the merchants of g ™ atness 
Malacca and for the other parts took shares in these; if a factor Malacca. 
of the King our Lord came to tax money and merchandise, so 
much per cent as aforesaid; and if someone else with officials 
came to take charge of the custom-house to collect dues; who can 



286 


TOM li PIRES 


doubt that in Malacca bahars of gold will be made, and that 
there will be no need of money from India, but it will go from 
here to there ? And I do not speak of Banda and the Moluccas, 
because it is the easiest thing in the world for all the spices to 
reach there [India] without any trouble, because Malacca pays 
wages and maintenance, and it will make money, and will send 
all the spices if they are acquired and traded and controlled, and 
if it has the people such as it deserves. Great affairs cannot be 
managed with few people. Malacca should be well supplied with 
people, sending some and bringing back others. It should be 
provided with excellent officials, expert traders, lovers of peace, 
not arrogant, quick-tempered, undisciplined, dissolute, but 
sober and elderly, for Malacca has no white-haired official. 
Courteous youth and business life do not go together; and since 
this cannot be had in any other way, at least let us have years, 
for the rest cannot be found. Men cannot estimate the worth of 
Malacca, on account of its greatness and profit. Malacca is a city 
that was made for merchandise, fitter than any other in the 
world; the end of monsoons and the beginning of others. 
Malacca is surrounded and lies in the middle, and the trade and 
commerce between the different nations for a thousand leagues 
on every hand must come to Malacca. Wherefore a thing of such 
magnitude and of such great wealth, which never in the world 
could decline, if it were moderately governed and favoured, 
should be supplied, looked after, praised and favoured, and not 
neglected; for Malacca is surrounded by Mohammedans who 
cannot be friends with us unless Malacca is strong, and the 
Moors will not be faithful to us except by force, because they are 
always on the look-out, and when they see any part exposed they 
shoot at it. And since it is known how profitable Malacca is in 
temporal affairs, how much the more is it in spiritual [affairs], as 
Mohammed is cornered and cannot go farther, and flees as 
much as he can. And let people favour one side, while merchan- 
dise favours our faith; and the truth is that Mohammed will be 
destroyed, and destroyed he cannot help but be. And true it is 
that this part of the world is richer and more prized than the 
world of the Indies, because the smallest merchandise here is 
gold, which is least prized, and in Malacca they consider it as 



MALACCA 287 

merchandise. Whoever is lord of Malacca has his hand on the 
throat of Venice. As far as from Malacca, and from Malacca to 
China, and from China to the Moluccas, and from the Moluccas 
to Java, and from Java to Malacca [and] Sumatra, [all] is in our 
power. Who understands this will favour Malacca; let it not be 
forgotten, for in Malacca they prize garlic and onions more than 
musk, benzoin, and other precious things. 

And since, as I was writing at this point, the Bemdara Njna Fol. ij8v. 
Chatuu died, on Sunday the twenty-seventh of January 1514 1 , 

2 According to Barros (11, ix, 6), Castanheda (hi, cxxix) and Gdis (hi, lxiii), 

Jorge de Albuquerque, the new Captain of Malacca who was to substitute the 
king of Kampar for Ninachatu in the office of Bendahara, arrived at Malacca 
at the beginning of July 1514. Ninachatu committed suicide after this date. 

How then does Pires come to say that it was in January 1514? According 
to what Castanheda says the suicide happened some months after the arrival 
of Jorge de Albuquerque. It may be that Pires’ year began at Easter, and so 
his January 1514 would be our January 1515. But nowhere else does he 
appear to reckon the year like this. The more likely explanation is that he 
absentmindedly wrote quatorze (fourteen) where he should have written 
quinze (fifteen). Castanheda (hi, cxxxvi) confirms Pires as to Ninachatu 
taking poison: ‘when Ninachatu knew that the king of Kampar was coming to 
Malacca to be the hendara, feeling that he would be disgraced if they deprived 
him of that office, he preferred to die with honour, and killed himself with 
poison which he took’. However, Barros and Gois tell a different story. Both 
say that Ninachatu made a rich pyre of sandalwood and lignaloes, and with 
great pomp and ceremony burnt himself alive, in the presence of his family 
and friends, after making a speech about the services he had rendered to the 
Portuguese and the ingratitude with which he had been treated. There is no 
doubt that he took poison, as stated by Pires, who was in Malacca at the time, 
and as confirmed by Castanheda. How did Barros and G6is come across the 
more romantic story of the pompous self-immolation in the odoriferous pyre ? 

On the other hand it seems that Pires’ judgement is not as sound as usual, 
when he refers to the reasons for the dismissal of Ninachatu. According to 
Castanheda, ‘the natives as well as the Moors felt themselves abased under 
the orders of Ninachatu, a merchant, and they would not feel abased under 
the orders of the king of Kampar; and also many other reasons which would 
be long to tell’. Barros says that ‘the noble people of Malacca hardly suffered 
to be governed by the heathen Nina Chetu, a man of low condition; and when 
any disagreed with him he ordered such persons to be given a certain kind of 
poison which made them leprous and die in a very short time, as was known 
to have been done to three or four principal merchants; and on account of the 
great service he had done in the rescue of Rui de Araujo and the other cap- 
tives, as well as in the taking of the city, they dissembled with him until the 
instructions from Afonso de Albuquerque arrived’. Informed of all these 
circumstances, the Governor General decided that Ninachatu should be 
replaced by the king of Kampar. Or did the chroniclers try to mitigate a case 
of sheer injustice due to the appalling intrigues then rife in Malacca? 



288 


TO M Ii PIRES 


Death of 
the Bem- 
dara 
Nyna 
Chatuu. 


with greater reason should I grieve over Malacca. Let it be 
known to all that the King our Lord lost more through the death 
of the Bemdara than his own sons lost, for he was a true and 
loyal servant of his Highness. The Bemdara died. Some say that 
he died of grief, others say that he took poison, prefering to die 
rather than see the king of Kampar ruling. And when he was 
preparing to die, with tears in his eyes he said: ‘If the great King 
of Portugal, Lord of the Indies, or his Governor, does not 
honour my sons after my death, God will not be God. Woe to 
thee Malacca, for here dies the true friend and servant of the 
King of Portugal.’ And dead is, beyond all doubt, one of the 
supports of Malacca, who maintained the service of the said 
Lord. May it please Our Lord that we do not miss Njna Chatuu, 
as we all fear. And if by chance I should not come before the 
presence of the King our Lord, or of his Governor of the Indies, 
I here declare that the death of Njna Chatuu makes it necessary 
for Malacca to have two hundred more Portuguese than were 
necessary [before] to uphold it, and that it is most important for 
the Governor of the Indies to come without delay to Malacca in 
force, as it is no less a pilgrimage than the one to Mecca, and he 
will destroy the credit of the king of Bintang, and tame the pride 
of the Javanese; he will listen to the merchants of Malacca; he 
will give them a ruler according to their nation. As merchandise 
is harmonious in itself, the ruler who is to control it, must favour 
it; otherwise the merchants will not be able to endure, for they 
are scandalized and agitated by the new coming of the king of 
Kampar to Malacca, which is very hateful and scandalous. And 
may Our Lord forgive whoever played such a trick on the 
Captain General, for he is more worthy of punishment than of 
favours. 

Now Maneco Bumj 1 is [Bemdara ?] of Malacca with the title of 

1 Maneco Bumj corresponds to the Mai. Mahgkd-bumi, ‘first councellor or 
minister of state, vizir, an assessor or coadjutor of the Monarch’. Marsden, 
Dictionary, s.v. ‘The king of Kampar exercised his office, not with the name 
of Bendahara, but with that of Macobume, which among them is as Viceroy 
among us, and this on account of the royal status he had’, says Barros, n, ix, 
7. ‘George de Albuquerque invested the king of Kampar in the office of 
Bendahara, with the title of Macubume, which is a dignity like Viceroy among 
us’, says G6is, hi, lxxix. Barros, Gois and Castanheda (in, cxlix) describe 



MALACCA 


289 

Governor. Raja Audelaa , king of Kampar. He is a youth and 
foolish, and a Malay, a nephew of the king of Bintang and 
married to his daughter. I do not think that he will have any 
success in Malacca. And as the Captain Major ordered it on 
information which would be given him for the purpose, it is 
certain that he must have done it out of a sense of duty, for his 
Lordship would not wish to see the loss of the fortunate king- 
dom he won. He should not allow the said Malay in Malacca, 
or any other, but throw him out at once, and put in someone not 
of Malay blood. Because a captain is sufficient to rule and govern, 
with governors according to the nations of the merchants. And 
he should strive for this, for anything else does not seem to me 
in the service of God or the King our Lord, or of the Captain- 
General. 

how the young man discharged satisfactorily the duties of his new office. But 
his father-in-law, the ex-king of Malacca, who hated him and intrigued 
against him with such success (with the help of the sons of Ninachatu, who 
thought he was the cause of their father’s death and hated him no less) that 
some months later Jorge de Albuquerque, at the instance of Bartolomeu 
Perestrelo, the new factor of Malacca, had him beheaded. G6is comments: 
‘It seems that God wished to provide speedy punishment for that injustice, 
showing that Bartolomeu Perestrelo had the greatest share of guilt in the 
death of that innocent man, because 17 days after he had been executed, 
Perestrelo died a sudden death, an example that men should follow reason 
and truth rather than impulses coupled with revenge*. And Barros adds: 
‘the people of Malacca said that the soul of the dead man summoned the soul 
of the living one’. 


E 


H.C.S. II 



THE BOOK OF 
FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


Fol. 3r. 


Fol. 4r. 


THIS BOOK WAS MADE BY 

FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 

PILOT-MAJOR OF THE ARMADA THAT 
DISCOVERED BANDA AND THE MOLUCCAS 

[TABLE OF CONTENTS ] 1 

On leaf twelve you will find the thirteen circles, from which you 
can learn any declination you need//. 

And on leaf fourteen you will find the table of the declination//. 

And on seventeen the declination/. 

And on twenty you will find a compass which will show you the 
amount of each degree/, and thus you will be able to work 
out the declination with it by using dividers. 

And on twenty-two you will find what each degree represents. 

And on leaf twenty-six you will find the first sphere and in it you 
will find all the west// [of Europe]. 

And on twenty-seven you will find the island of Madeira and the 
Canaries and the Azores Islands/. 

And on leaf twenty-eight you will find Cape Verde and the 
[Cape Verde] Islands/. 

And on leaf twenty-nine you will find Ascension Island/. 

And on leaf thirty you will find Brazil./ &c. 

And on thirty-one you will find the Island of San Thome, etc.// 

And on thirty-two you will find the Cape of Good Hope. 

And on thirty-three you will find the islands of Tristan da Cunha. 

And on thirty-four you will find Sofala and the Comoro Islands 
(Ilhas Primeiras ) and Mozambique and also the Island of 
Madagascar ( Sam Louretifo). 

And on thirty-six you will also find Cape Guardafui and the 
mouth of the strait of Mecca//. 

1 The numeration of this Table of Contents ‘does not correspond to the 

present numeration in the Paris Codex. See Introduction, p. lxxxviii. 

290 



RED SEA RUTTER 291 

And on thirty-seven you will find Ormuz and all the coast of 
India and Cambay//. 

And further on leaf thirty-eight you will find Cape Comorin and 
the Island of Ceylon and the crossing from Ceylon to 
Gamispola ; and from Gamispola to Malacca/ . . . 

[at the entrance to the red sea] Fol. 

T WO leagues from the mouth of the strait there is a 
castle on top of a mountain which looks like Palmela 1 . To 
the west of this you can anchor in a depth of ten fathoms 
anywhere you like without fear. There is a very good and much 
used port in the west called Narham . All the bottom [of the sea] 
is free from rocks. There is water in this port. It is a cannon-shot 
from the sea. The island which is at the mouth of the strait is 
called Vera Cruz 2 . It lies in [latitude] twelve degrees and two 

1 This must be Turba, a fortress or castle the ruins of which still exist on a 
promontory 480 feet high, on Huns Murad Point, which forms a bay of good 
depth, protecting it from the west. The Red Sea and Gulf of Aden Pilot 
(1932 ed.) says: ‘About cables north-north-eastward of Warner point lies 
Turba, a square hill 480 feet (146 m. 3) high, on which stands the ruins of a 
fort (Lat. 12 0 14' N., Long. 43 0 30' E.)’. The corresponding Admiralty Chart 
shows the ‘Turba ruins’ on ‘Huns Murad’ point, and the soundings nearer to 
the bay run from 7 to 17 fathoms. This bay lies exactly two leagues (6.4 miles) 
from the western part of Perim Island, i.e. the beginning of the Large Strait. 
About 1.6 miles from Turba there is a hill, Jebel Manhali, 967 feet high. 

D. Joao de Castro says, in describing his voyage from Socotora to Aden: ‘The 
pilots said that the land we saw in the morning seemed to be Dabiam, which 
lies 1 s leagues before Aden’. Roteiro do Mar Roxo, p. 27. There may be some 
connexion between Francisco Rodrigues’ Narham and the present Jebel 
Manhali or the former Dabiam, though with regard to the latter the distance 
from Turba to Aden is much greater than 15 leagues. It would seem more 
likely, however, that Narham was a corruption of Huns Murad. In one of the 
maps — ‘Taboa das Portas do Estreito’ — which illustrates the Roteiro do Mar 
Roxo, Perim island and the coast to the neighbourhood of Aden is represented 
with remarkable accuracy; on the point corresponding to Huns Murad the 
fortress or castle referred to by Francisco Rodrigues is drawn. 

2 The island of Vera Cruz was first known to the Portuguese as Ilha de 
Mehum or Mium, the native name which it still keeps, and is at present better 
known as Perim Island. In his long letter of 4 Dec. 1513 to King Manuel, in 
which he reports this expedition to the Red Sea, here referred to by Rodri- 
gues, Albuquerque says: ‘When the time of our departure came, on the 15 
July [1513], we left the port and sailed towards the mouth of the strait; after 
passing through it I anchored with all the ships just behind the island. . . . We 
went through a great part of the island; ... I planted a cross, made of a large 
mast, in the mouth of the strait, on the hill which lies at the entrance; and we 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


292 

thirds, taken on land. There is a port in the middle of it on the 
south side and at the entrance to it the water is six, seven and 
eight fathoms deep. A ship of two hundred tons can put in at this 
port at high tide. It lies north and south with Zeila. It is thirty 
leagues away from Berbera (B arbor a), and from Berbera to Aden 
Fol. 5v. it is another thirty leagues north | and south and from Zeila to 
Aden it is forty leagues; it is north-west south-east with Aden. 

Zeila is in [the latitude of] a little more than eleven degrees. It is 
thirty leagues from the Island of Vera Cruz to Zeila. This port 
in this island is very good in any wind; you will be in six or seven 
fathoms of water, and so good is the port that you will not be 
able to see where you went in 1 . 

VOYAGE THAT I MADE WITH JOAO GOMES 
CAPTAIN OF THE CARAVEL TO DAHLAK (DALACA) 

This is the voyage we made going from the Island of Ceybam 2 
to Dahlak. We made towards the east for Ceybam, and fifteen or 
sixteen leagues to the east of Ceybam we ran into a shoal there is 
there, which is three or four leagues in length and two-thirds of 
a league wide. It lies north-west south-east, and at its deepest it 
measures four fathoms and from that it goes to as little as one 
and a half fathoms. These shoals are composed of rock and sand 
and the lowest of them is in the south-east point. I took the altitude 
of the sun and I found that it was fifteen degrees. We saw before 
us three islands to the west-north-west about five leagues away, 
and they lie east and west and very close to one another. We 
went towards them, and half way there we ran into another shoal 
half a league long and about a cannon shot in width. There are 

gave it the name of Ilha da Vera Cruz.’ Cartas, 1, 231-2. On Rodrigues’ map 
showing the Gulf of Aden and the eastern part of the Red Sea, Perim Island 
bears the inscription — ilha que esta na boca do estreito de meca. 

1 Some of this information is remarkably accurate. Perim Island lies in 
12 0 14' N and Zeila in n° 15' N. The soundings at the entrance of Perim 
harbour show nine fathoms and inside the harbour six and seven fathoms. 
Between Zeila and Berbera there are thirty-two leagues, and between Zeila 
and Aden thirty-seven leagues; but from Berbera to Aden there are forty- 
three leagues and from Perim to Zeila twenty-five leagues only. 

2 Ceybam or Ceibam is Jebel Te'ir Island, which lies forty-five miles west- 
north-west of Kamaran. Though Rodrigues begins the description of the 
voyage from Ceybam, the caravel sailed first from Kamaran. 



RED SEA RUTTER 


293 

six fathoms of water at the deepest (?) part of this. This first 
island is marked by a wood of trees [altogether] as large as a ship, 
and near to the trees there is a creek like the one in Kamaran, 
except that it is very shelfy. We went [ along beside them, turn- Fol. 6r. 
ing to the north-east. They have two rocky hills; the Moorish 
pilot we took with us told us it was a harbour. 

From there we made our way to the north-west and a quarter 
point to the west by order of the Moorish pilot. We anchored 
for the night in fifteen fathoms because the wind calmed down. 

The next morning we found ourselves surrounded by islands 
with many shoals and shallows. We were forced to sail into the 
wind all day. God was very merciful to us in getting us out of 
these islands. And as we were leaving them we saw the island of 
Dahlak, which lay to the southward of us. We sailed towards 
this island over a shoal of four, five and six fathoms; but when 
we came up to the point of the island we found a great depth and 
we sailed along by the island, which lies east and west, until 
we came to an islet and we found a great depth of water all the 
way — from twenty to thirty fathoms. Our Moorish pilot said 
that we must pass between the islet and the land. This would be 
at sunset. When we came up to the islet we suddenly came into 
two fathoms and touched the bottom. We took soundings from 
the little boat until we found a place where the water was seven 
fathoms deep, and we put the caravel there until daybreak. We 
sailed into the wind, tacking from side to side, and we could not 
get out of this place where the water was seven fathoms deep. 

We anchored again, hoping for a quarter wind so that we could 
get out through a channel two fathoms deep. It is two leagues 
from this islet to the port of Dahlak, and six leagues to the point 
where we came in. The island of Dahlak lies east and west until 
you come to the port and from the port onwards it goes up 
towards the north-east 1 . 

The depth of water at the entrance to the port of Dahlak is Fol. 6v. 
two and a half fathoms, three to three and a half fathoms and a 
fathom and a half, and there are many reefs and shoals of sand. 

In the middle of the channel the water is from five to five and a 
half fathoms deep. The channel is so narrow that no large ship 

1 It should be north-west. 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


294 

of ours could go through it except with cables at the stern (?) 
and the anchor ready. Inside the port there are from two and a 
half to three fathoms of water and there is no safe harbourage 
there. Unless [the ships] are to fall foul of one another there is 
room there for three ships moored to one another with four 
anchors. We say three ships not because the port is not large but 
because it is shelfy and at low tide there is not even a foot of 
water and at high tide there is a fathom more or less. At the dis- 
tance of a cannon shot outside the port, there are forty and fifty 
fathoms. It is all rocky. The captain landed to talk to the Moors. 

We asked the Moorish pilot if he knew of any port in the land 
of Abyssinia. He replied that he knew of none, but that he had 
heard tell that there was a port on the north-west and that it took 
two days to get there. We set out from there and we ran along 
the coast of Abyssinia for nine or ten days without seeing a ship 
or a living soul, nor did we see any manner of port nor a place 
where we could disembark. We asked the Moorish pilot which 
was the real route taken by their great ships from Kamaran to 
Dahlak and asked him to take us along it so that we could learn 
it. Under his direction we sighted the Island of Dahlak again; 
thence we sailed to the east along by a sandbank which was on 
the larboard side, and we made for the islands at which we had 
touched first, because the Moorish pilot said that this was the 
way their great ships went. We went on in this way until night- 
Fol. yr. fall, when the wind dropped and we anchored in twelve j 
fathoms until the next day, when we set sail and saw an island 
to the leeward of us which lay to the east-south-east, and the 
Moorish pilot said that our route lay along by the south side of 
this island; and when we came up to it, the Moor began to make 
a great show of surprise that it was not the island past which we 
had to go, and brought us over a shoal over which we went for 
more than three leagues until we reached the first islands which 
we had passed on the way to Dahlak. You must go to the west and 
a quarter to the north-west, and must go on for two leagues until 
you reach the channel and from there you must go to the west, 
for this Moorish pilot was anxious to avoid showing us this road 
if he could, and he worked pretty hard for this. 

It seemed to me that for both large and small ships you must 



NAUTICAL RULES 


295 

have a favourable wind to go the right way, because we found 
seventeen islands along this route as well as quantities of sand- 
banks and shoals and many shelves 1 . 

[ascertaining the latitude] 

And in the next chapter you will find a table for these thirteen Pol. 8v. 
circles (counting the outside one), by which you will be able to 
work out the declination for any day you need. By means of the 
twelve inside circles you can find out how the sun moves away 
from the equinoctial line and towards it. 

First you must know that in order to have a true understand- 
ing of the circles that are in this figure you must have knowledge 
of the movement of the heavens. For you must know that all 
the heavens are imaginary, because there is only one circle set 
in the heavens — called the Zodiac — and this lies east-south- 
east west-north-west in relation to the equator, which lies east 
and west, and all the other circles in the globe are imagined in 
relation to this one. This Zodiac is divided into three hundred 
and sixty degrees, as you see it drawn here, and it is twelve and 
a half degrees wide from the east to a line which is called the 
ecliptic, along which the sun moves one degree and sometimes 
less. These said circles are the true ecliptic line, projected on to 
a plane surface as you see them in this figure. And the twelve 
signs are also placed in the said Zodiac, and each one of these 
signs has thirty degrees through which the sun moves in the 
course of thirty days, since it moves one degree each day, and it 

1 The course followed by the caravel was very likely from Ceybam to the 
shoals fifteen leagues westwards, in Lat. 1 5° 20' N. The islands west-north- 
west would be Mojeidi, Ancara and Dhu-l-leurash. After that they sailed 
north-westwards and sighted the north-east part of the island of Dahlak, the 
south-east point of which, Ras Shoke, they doubled, sailing along the 
southern coast, which runs from east to west, where the sea is very deep, 
reaching eighty-five fathoms. They sighted the Shuma islet, which lies seven 
and a half leagues from Ras Shoke and only one and a half from Dahlak Kebir 
harbour. This harbour is accessible only to small flat-bottomed boats, and is 
no more than two fathoms deep at the entrance. Then they sailed north- 
westwards looking for the harbour that the Arabian pilot said lay in that 
direction; they could not find it, probably because the harbour in question 
was Massawa which lay due west. They followed along the coast, whose first 
port is near Suakin, but returned to Dahlak and then to Kamaran. On the 
whole voyage, see Introduction, pp. Ixxxiv-lxxxvii and plate VII. 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


296 

thus completes its circle in a year. And the planets also move 
in this Zodiac, and this Zodiac shows the declination — that is, 
when the sun is in these signs; and in some of them it has little 
declination and in some it has much. In each case the declina- 
tion is the number of degrees from the line downwards and 
going through the middle of the circles. And if you want to work 
out the declination you must have a divider, and you must go to 
the person who made it so that he can teach you, or you must go 
to someone else, because I cannot make you understand it in 
any other way. 1 F rancisco Rodrigues 


JESUS 

Fol. 1 or. Whenever you want to take the sun’s altitude you must do so 

punctually at noon, and whenever you take it you must look 
carefully to see where the sun is in relation to the equinoctial 
line, whether it is on the south side or on the north side, because 
you must know that the sun is on the north side of the equator for 
six months, that is from the 1 1 March to the 14 Sept., and from 
the 14 Sept, to the 1 1 March it is on the south side of the equin- 
octial line; and therefore every time you take it you must be careful 
to see where the sun is and calculate accordingly 2 . 

1 This curious figure (fol. 9r.) is rather similar to part of the figure printed 
on the penultimate page of the Regimento do estrolabio 1 do quadrante (so- 
called Regimento de Munich — Lisbon 1509? first ed. 1495?), which contains 
a translation of Sacrobosco’s Sphera. The figure in the Regimento, and its 
inscriptions, were studied in 1937 by Fontoura da Costa, A intrigante pentil- 
tima pagina do ‘ Regimento de Munich’. The inscription at the top is exactly 
the same in the Regimento and in Rodrigues’ figure, but the former has other 
inscriptions and drawings, though not the Zodiac. The translation of the 
inscription at the top is: Whence the sun proceeds thou hast light for the signs 
and for the planets, both to those which are above and to those which are below. 
There is the soul of the world. The six circles seem to represent Mars, 
Jupiter and Saturn (above), and the Moon, Mercury and Venus (below), each 
divided in 36 parts (of 10 degrees). The vertical rule in the lower half of the 
zodiacal circle (which does not appear in the Regimento’s figure) is divided 
in 23 i parts, corresponding to the 23 £ degrees of the obliquity. It is not easy, 
however, to make Rodrigues’ description agree with the figure. He himself 
is not very sure of his explanation; we do not know whether he even under- 
stood what he tries to explain. Perhaps that is why he advises the reader 
to go to someone else for an explanation, ‘because I cannot make you under- 
stand it in any other way’. 

2 When the Portuguese began to sail the Atlantic Ocean, in search either 
of the Islands or of cape Bojador, they realised the necessity of knowing the 



PLATE XXXI 



Fol. gr of the Book of Francisco Rodrigues. Figure to illustrate the 
rule for “Ascertaining the latitude” (pp. 295-6) 


n'W'l.'' 



PLATE XXXII 



bafclanoaoeaoa 

afyaoefupcrioies 

/Cabcalmaoonjo 


gocmoe bo flbll p:oc cdc 
f ignoe a aoe pfaneras 
ccrniOaoejnfcrio:ea, 


/£ftcbe3Ulfraganobo 

capooc(comp:aiDcrj> 

tts-Hoojetoamw 


'boafagccooaocoe 

rajam,. 


The penultimate page of the Regimento de Munich (p. 296) 






NAUTICAL RULES 297 

Whenever you find the sun between you and the line you 
must make the following calculations: 

You must know that if the sun be between you and the line 
you must work out its declination in this way: Say, for example, 
that you took the sun’s altitude at seventy degrees, you would 
notice how much you lacked for ninety; you find you lacked 
twenty. You would ignore the seventy degrees which you had 
taken as the sun’s altitude, and you would add the remaining 
twenty to the declination of the actual day, and the result would 
give you your distance from the equinoctial. 

altitude of the Pole above the horizon (the latitude) and had to have recourse 
to the help of the Infant’s (Prince Henry the Navigator) experts. At that time 
the Regras dos Libros del Saber of Alphonso X, for ascertaining this altitude 
ashore by the sun’s meridian altitude, were well known. These Precepts, like 
all the subsequent ones, required knowledge, first, of the maximum altitude 
of the sun, and secondly of its declination. The sun’s altitude was measured 
either by the astrolabe or by the quadrant; the sun’s declination was obtained 
either mechanically from the astrolabe, or from Tables. Accordingly, the 
technicians of the Infant had to alter the Precepts for use at sea, and these 
were known as the Rule of the astrolabe and of the quadrant and later on as the 
Rule of the declination ; they had also to make the instruments of observation 
(the astrolabes and the quadrants) fit for nautical use, and had in addition to 
simplify the Tables of declination so that they might be used by the Portu- 
guese sailors, common people of little learning. Like the Precepts, the first 
Rule refers to the meridian altitude. Duarte Pacheco Pereira, in more 
polished language, formulates a Rule in which he takes the positions of the 
sun and of the observer in relation to the equator into account. This is the 
first Rule outlined by Francisco Rodrigues, and it may be expressed by the 
following formulae: 

(1) When the sun is between the observer and the equator, the observer 
being North or South of the equator: Latitude (N. or S.) =(90° - Altitude of 
the sun) + Declination. 

(2) When the observer is between the equator and the sun, (North or 
South of the equator): 

Latitude (N. or S.) = (Altitude -(-Declination) -90°. 

(3) When the equator is between the observer and the sun, the observer 
being North or South of the equator: 

Latitude (N. or S.) =90° - (Altitude -(-Declination). 

(4) Altitude =90°; 

(a) Declination = o° : Latitude =o°. 

( b ) Declination different from o°: Latitude = Declination 

N. or S. N. or S. 

(5) Altitude + Declination =90°: Latitude =o°. 

It should be observed that the findings in the third case are not complete, 
since (Altitude + Declination) may be greater than 90°, a fact which is not 
mentioned by Rodrigues. (Note by Commander A. Fontoura da Costa). 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


Fol. iov. 


Fols. nr. 
i3v . 


298 

When you find yourself between the line and the sun, you 
must make the following calculations: 

You must know that if you are between the line and the sun 
you must take your altitude with a quadrant or an astrolabe, and 
you must add the altitude you take to the declination of the day 
on which you take it, and subtract ninety from that amount to 
find your distance from the equinoctial. 

If the equinoctial line be between you and the sun, you must 
make the following calculations: 

You must know that if the equinoctial line be between you 
and the sun you must take your altitude punctually at midday; 
and you must add the altitude you take to the declination for the 
day and subtract that from ninety to find your distance from the 
equinoctial line. | If you happened to take the sun’s altitude as 
ninety degrees and there should be no declination for that day, 
then you would know that both you and the sun were on the 
equinoctial line. And if there should be some declination then 
you would be at that distance from the equinoctial line. And if 
it happened that, when you added the altitude you had taken to 
the declination for the day, it came to exactly ninety degrees, 
then you would know that you were on the equinoctial line. 

Francisco Rodrigues 


[tables of the sun’s declination] 

(See Portuguese text , pp. 312-7) 1 

1 There must have been originally a Single Solar Table, i.e. a Table for the 
leap year only, which could be used also during the three following years, 
because the slight differences in minutes were not of importance, owing to the 
approximate character of the altitudes measured by contemporary instru- 
ments of observation. This Table, of which no traces are extant, may possibly 
have been calculated by Ben Verga who lived in Lisbon in 1457, the Table 
being, of course, for the leap year 1456. Jos6 Vizinho translated and abridged 
the very notable Hebrew work of Zacuto named Ha-jibbur Ha-gadol ( The 
Greatest Composition), and published it in Leiria in the year 1496 under the 
well-known title of Almanach Perpetuum. Vizinho must have become 
acquainted with Zacuto’s work in Salamanca. He used it to calculate the 
Single Solar Table of the Regimento de Munich for a leap year from March 
1475 to February 1476. For every day of each month the Table gives the 
place of the sun (i.e. the Right ascension) in degrees only, and its declination 
in degrees and minutes; but the seamen only required — as they still do— -to 



NAUTICAL RULES 


299 


[PORTUGUESE RULES OF THE LEAGUES] 


Regimento to show you how much to multiply each degree 

for leagues. 

Straight line from north to south, each degree equals seventeen 
leagues and a half. 

In the first quarter you will go nineteen leagues and a half for 
every degree. 

In the first half division, which are two quarters, you will go 
twenty-one and a half per degree. 

For the first three quarters you will go twenty-three leagues and 
a half per degree. 

If you follow the north-east to south-west rhumbline you will be 
going twenty-five leagues per degree. 

If you follow the five quarters you will be going thirty-two 
leagues and a half per degree. 

If you follow the six quarters you will go forty-six leagues and a 
half per degree. 

If you follow the seven quarters you will go ninety leagues and 
a half per degree. 

Sixty minutes make one degree. 


Chapter concerning one quarter of the compass. So that you 
may know how much each degree is, and from that you can 
work out all the others. 

When you are navigating north and south a degree^ 
corresponds to sixteen leagues and two thirds, and 
with each league the gain is three minutes and 
thirty-six seconds. 


i6| 


know the declination. This Table was in use for many years. Rodrigues tran- 
scribed this Single Solar Table (fols. nr.-i3v.); nevertheless it must be ob- 
served that, at the time when he wrote his MS, there existed the four-yearly 
Tables of the Declination, calculated by Zacuto for the Solar Tables of his 
Almanack Perpetuum, for 1497-1500, and intended for the voyage of Vasco da 
Gama. They were later used also on the voyages of Cabral and on various 
other voyages of the beginning of the sixteenth century. These Tables by 
Zacuto are reproduced, without the sun’s places, in the Suma de Geografia of 
Fernandez Enciso, and some traces of it (the sun’s positions and declinations) 
exist in the MS by Andr6 Pires (Fonds. port. no. 40, Bibliothfeque Nationale, 
Paris). In Rodrigues’ transcription, the minutes of the declination for July 
are missing. (Note by Commander A. Fontoura da Costa). 


Fol. I5r. 


Fol. i6r. 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


300 

When you are navigating north by east it requires 
seventeen leagues to gain one degree, and for each 
league the gain is three minutes and thirty-one ■ 
seconds and forty-five thirds and fifty-three 
quarters. 

When you are navigating north-north-east it requires' 
eighteen leagues to gain one degree, and for each 
league the gain is three minutes and twenty 
seconds. 

When you are navigating north-east by north it re-j 
quires twenty leagues to gain one degree, and for l 
each league the gain is three minutes. J 

When you arenavigating north-east, it requires twenty- j 
four leagues to gain one degree, and for eachj- 
league the gain is two minutes and thirty seconds. J 

When you are navigating north-east by east, it requires 
thirty leagues to gain one degree, and for each - 
league the gain is two minutes. 

When you are navigating east-north-east, it requires'! 
forty-one leagues and a half to gain one degree, I 
and for each league the gain is twenty-six seconds J 
and forty-four thirds. J 

When you are navigating east by north, it requires' 
eighty-three leagues to gain one degree, and 
for each league the gain is forty-three seconds - 
and twenty-four thirds and twenty-four quar- 
ters. 


-17 


-18 


-20 


-24 


-30 


-41 



And you will find all these calculations more clearly ( ?) 
in a compass-rose which you will find above 1 . 


1 Rodrigues gives two Rules ( Regimentos ) for ascertaining the distance 
(in leagues) sailed along any point of the compass, the change in latitude 
being one degree. In the first one, reckoning 17 £ leagues for one degree of 
latitude, and in the second, i6f leagues, he gives the distance AC, hypotenuse, 
of the rectangular triangle ABC. In the other Rule, he reckons i6f leagues 
for one degree and gives the distances AC and also the values of the 
change in latitude (in minutes, seconds, thirds and fourths) for a league 
sailed along each point of the compass; some of the figures given are 
wrong, owing to miscalculation of AC, and there is an error in the sixth 
point: ‘for each league the gain is twenty-six seconds and forty-four thirds’, 



CHINA RUTTER 


3 QI 

[System of wind-roses prepared for a map which was never Fol. ijr. 
drawn.] 

[The recto of each of these folios bears a map.] Fols - 18 ~ 

[Wind-rose in the centre and scale of leagues on the left, for a 3 °' 
map which was never drawn.] and ^ 2r 

[The recto of each of these folios bears a map.] Fq1s ^ 

42 . 


ROUTE TO CHINA 


Fol. 37v. 


From Malacca to Pulo Par am it is five jaos, and from there to 
Pisang (Pifam) another five, and from Pulo Pisang to Karimun 
(Caryman) it is three jaos, and from Karimun to Singapore it is 
five, and from Singapore to Pedra Branca five, and from [Pedra 
Branca to] Pull Tingi ( Tymge ) five jaos to the north-east, and by 
this route another five jaos to Tioman ( Vioma ), and from Pulo 
Tioman to Pulo Condore ( Condor ) it is forty-five jaos going 



as T has been omitted. Also, in the margin, 41 is 
C written instead of 41^. The numbers must, in fact, 
be calculated through the well-known formula: 


distance = 


d' latitude 


cos. (course) 

In the first Rule, the numbers given are all wrong 
and differ from those in the Regimento de Munich as 
well as from those of all other known Tables; Rodrigues 
may possibly have got these numbers, either from 
an erroneous earlier copy, or by roughly measuring 
the hypotenuse of the triangles graphically on a small 
scale. The following Table gives the numbers of 
leagues, at 17J for one degree, as found in the 
MS, and then the correct numbers; similar figures 
for the value i6f leagues to a degree, and, finally, 
the changes in latitude for each league sailed, found in the MS, with the 
correct values. 


Courses 
North or South 
1st point 1 1 0 1 5' 
2nd point 22 0 30' 
3rd point 33 0 45' 
4th point 45° 

5th point 56° 15' 
6th point 67° 30' 
7th point 78° 45' 


17! leagues =i° 
Distances 

Distances 

i6f leagues = i° 
Change in lat. for e 

MS 

Correct 

MS 

Correct 

MS 

I7i 

I7i 

165 

16$ 

3' 36" 

i9i 

I7f 

17 

17 

3' 3i” 45'" 53"" 
3' 20" 

21I 

19 

18 

18 

23 i 

21 

20 

20 

3' 

25 

24} 

24 

23! 

2' 30" 

32! 

3il 

30 

3° 

2' 

4&i 

45* 

41 

43 1 

_ / ./// . ./// 

O 20 44 

0 43 24 24 

9°i 

m 

S3 

851 


Correct 
3' 36" 

3' 3i” 44'" 24'"' 
3' 19" 58'" 48"" 

2' 33" 10'" 43"" 

1' 22" 45'" 59"" 
o' 42" 9'" 14"" 


(Note sketched by Commander A. Fontoura da Costa and amplified by 
Commander D. Gernez). See plate XXXIII. 



302 FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 

north and a quarter north-east, and from Pulo Condore to the 
Terra de Champara, Terra Vermelha , it is fifteen jaos to the 
north-east, and from this Terra Vermelha along the coast to Cape 
Varella ( Berela ) it is fourteen jaos to the north-east, and from 
Varella to Pulo Canton (Cotom) twel vejaos along the said route, 
and from Pulo Canton to Hainan (Aynam) twenty-five jaos to 
the north-east, and from here to Pulo Canton twenty jaos to the 
north-east. And to go from Pulo Canton straight to the bar of 
Timom you must go to the north-east and always keep to the east 
so that the currents do not carry you into the gulf of Cauchy 1 . 

1 As far as we know this is the earliest written rutter of the route from 
Malacca to the Canton River, at least in any European language. It is inserted 
on the back of the folio containing the map of the Moluccas and Timor, and 
the sketches on the next five folios purport to represent some of the coasts 
and islands between Malacca and China. The rutter, written in Rodrigues’ 
hand, was probably obtained from a Chinese pilot and added after the maps 
had been drawn. 

Pulo Param must correspond to Pulo Padang and Pulo Bangkalis, which 
are separated by a very narrow channel and lie very close to the east coast of 
central Sumatra. The north-east point of Bangkalis, called Tanjong Parit, is 
forty-two miles from Malacca and forty-six miles from Pulo Pisang. 

Pedra Branca is still the name of an islet at the eastern entrance of Singa- 
pore Strait. 

Terra de Champara, Terra Vermelha. Terra de Champara, Land of 
Champa (see note p. 112); Terra Vermelha, i.e., Red Land, must be Phan Ri 
bay, on the coast of Annam. ‘Between Guio Point (Lat. n° 3' N) and Phan 
Ri (1 1° 1 o') the coast consists of cliffs of a reddish colour’, says the China Sea 
Pilot, 1. A little farther south, just west of Vinay Point, there is also a place 
marked ‘Red Sand Hills’ (io° 57') in the Admiralty Chart. Phan Ri bay lies 
220 miles from Pulo Condore and about 160 from Cape Varella, along the 
coast. Pulo Cotom is Pulo Canton or Kulao Rfe (Rai), an islet fifteen miles 
eastward of Cape Bantan (15 0 23'). There is also a Canton rock further north 
(16 0 io'), at the entrance of Tourane bay, which may somehow be connected 
with the second Pulo Cotom mentioned by Rodrigues in a very confused 
manner. This is suggested by the twenty-five jaos from Pulo Canton to Hainan 
and the twenty jaos ‘from here (Hainan) to Pulo Canton’, though the differ- 
ence of fi vejaos is not in proportion; in this case, however, he should have 
said south-west, not north-east. 

Timom is Pires’ Turnon, or Lin Tin Island, in the entrance of the Canton 
River. See note pp. 121-2. 

Cauchy — Gulf of Cauchy means Gulf of Cochin China, i.e., the Gulf of 
Tong-King. 

JXo — F. Mendes Pinto (xxxxi) twice mentions the jao as a measure of 
distance. Referring to the perimeter of ‘the great lake Cunebete or Chiammay’ 
(Tonle Sap?) in Cochin China, he says that ‘it is sixty jaos around, at the rate 
of three leagues each jao'. Then he says (xcv) that the China Wall is ‘seventy 
jaos long, at the rate of 4^ leagues each jao’. In the first instance the jao is 



NAUTICAL RULES 


303 

[The rectos of these folios have drawings showing the Fob. 43 
northern part of the islands from Solor to Sumbawa, as seen 8 $- 
from the sea]. 


[rule of the sun’s declination] 

The degree you find above the degrees of any of the signs in Fol. 86r. 
the four tables will give you the true position of the sun and 
save work and the drawing up of a table. This you will find in 
the table of declinations on the right-hand side, where it shows 
what we have to add in each of the said revolutions that are to 
come. And in order to make this clearer to the reader, I should 
like to give the following example as an illustration: in order to 
learn the true position of the sun on the 1 5 March in the year 
of our Lord 1520, you must subtract from the said 1520 the root 
of the tables, which is 1508 years, so that twelve years are left. 

From these you take away as many fours as you can find and we 
are left with four years in hand, which shows you that you must 
consult the fourth table of the sun, and then, that in the fourth 
table you must look up that day exactly — that is, on the 15 day 
of March you will find that the sun is at four degrees and fifty- 
three minutes and thirty-one seconds, which are for the three 
revolutions of the sun which are over, as you will see in the table 
corresponding to the three revolutions; and as soon as you find 

equal to 9.6 miles, in the second instance it is equal to 14.4 miles. In the list 
of distances given by Rodrigues, the length of a jao appears to vary consider- 
ably. Its total of i^jaos as far as Hainan, however, corresponding to 1.402 
miles, gives 9.7 miles per jao, which is practically the same as the 3 leagues 
(9.6 miles) given by Pinto in the first instance. Jauh in Malay means distance; 
but Rodrigues and Pinto’s references seem to indicate that the word is 
derived from the Chinese. In his analysis of the Chinese geographical work 
compiled by Ma Huan in the early part of the fifteenth century, G. Phillips 
says that the latitude of places ‘is shown by the North Star being reckoned at 
so many digits and so many eighths high. These are called in Chinese chih 
and chio [spelt chiao on p. 225], which first corresponds to the Arabic Issaba 
or Terfe, meaning a finger, and the latter to the Arabic Zam. The Issaba is 
equal to i° 36', and the Zam to 12V The Seaports of India and Ceylon, p. 218. 

On the other hand Prof. Moule tells me that in China distances by water were 
reckoned by chiu, Cantonese kau, which means ‘nine’. Though the Chinese 
chio, chiu, chiao and kau, or the Arabic Zam, being equal to 12', was longer 
than the 9.7 miles reckoned above for the jao, I venture to suggest that some 
connexion may exist between these expressions. 



304 FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 

this you will say truly that the sun is at four degrees and fifty- 
three minutes and thirty-one seconds and that there will be two 
degrees and twenty minutes of declination. You must know that, 
for the sake of clearness, I want to show you how you can really 
know the position of the sun, whether it is in the northern signs 
or in the southern signs. You must look with a true compass, 
wherever the sun rises, at whatever time it may be, and if the 
sun rises in the east then the sun will be in the middle of the 
equinoctial line, and if the sun rises in the north-east quarter you 
will know that it is in the northern signs, and if it rises in the 
south-east quarter you will know that it is in the southern signs 1 . 


CHAPTER TO EXPLAIN HOW YOU SHOULD NAVIGATE 

BY SHADOWS 2 

You must know that wherever you may be, whether on land 
or sea, if you want to know how far you are from the equinoctial 
to the north or the south or whether you are directly on it, you 
must first take the sun’s altitude with an astrolabe or quadrant 
punctually at midday and when the sun is at its highest, and you 
will take eight degrees more or less, and having taken the sun’s 
altitude you must subtract this from ninety, and then you must 
proceed until what you have is the sun’s declination. Corre- 

1 This Chapter is related to an Almanack Perpetuum of 1508 and it is 
intended to show, by an example for 1530, how the sun’s declination must be 
ascertained. The author, however, makes some mistakes about the numbers 
given. (Note by Commander A. Fontoura da Costa). 

2 Rodrigues discusses again the Rule of the Sun with regard to the shadow. 
This time he partly transcribes the Rule of the Regimento de Munich relating 
to the hemisphere in which the observer is placed, the position of the sun and 
the direction of the shadow. 

Here are the formulae given by the author: 

(1) The observer and the sun in the North, the shade being also to the 
North: 

Latitude N. =(90° - Altitude) -f- Declination. 

(2) The observer and the sun in the South, the shade being also to the 
South: 

Latitude S. =(90° - Altitude) + Declination. 

(3) The observer in the South, the sun in the North, the shadow being to 
the South: 

Latitude S. =90° - (Altitude + Declination). 

(Note by Commander A. Fontoura da Costa). 






Compass-rose, in the Book of Francisco Rodrigues, for measuring 
a degree in leagues, on different rhumbs (pp. 299-301) 









1 

i • 

I DaV 

1 Hr AV n^||nk X V 

mg'* ry| 
■BBWBIy v v>|Hr‘ 

%Mm 

• / 1 




flB|f#^ni 










■r ^2B s 


i >£'. . v > • „ vjh •fjf^' ^ MXJbfr V '. '" V r ~ " — ' . T *^' " ' ' ■ ' aHl ^ 


NAUTICAL RULES 


305 

sponding to that month you will find the degree of the Zodiac 
where the sun is and what the declination then is, then you add 
the amount of degrees and minutes you are less | than ninety and Fol. 86v 
you add further the declination for that day and you will be that 
distance from the equinoctial, because the shadow falls towards 
the north and at the same time the sun is in the northern signs. 

And if it should be between n March and 14 Sept., which is 
when the sun is passing through the six signs which are on the 
north side of the equinoctial, then you must make the calcula- 
tion in the way I have described on account of the shadow which 
falls towards the north. And if perchance you happen to be 
navigating to the south of the equator, you must know that 
when the sun is in the other six signs on the southern side and 
when your shadow falls towards the south you will calculate in 
the very way you did for the other signs on the north, that is 
from 14 Sept, until 1 1 March, which is when the sun is passing 
through the six signs on the southern side and for this reason it 
makes your shadow to the south; and to make this clearer I now 
give you the following example: and I say thus, that on the 20 Aug. 
you took the sun’s altitude and found it to be sixty-five degrees 
and the shadow was then falling to the north, you would then 
see how much less this was than ninety, which is twenty-five 
degrees. Then you would go to the table and look carefully to 
see what the declination was in degrees and minutes for that day 
and add these to the twenty-five degrees, and if you had made 
the calculation very carefully, that would be your distance from 
the equator on the north side. And if it happened that the 
shadow was falling to the south on the said day and you took 
the said degrees, then you would add the degrees and minutes 
of the declination for the said day to the altitude you had taken, 
and if the result did not come to ninety, then the degrees less 
than ninety would be your distance from the equinoctial on the 
south side, because then your shadow was falling to the south, etc. 

[The rectos of these folios have drawings showing the north- Fols. 87 - 
ern part of Lombok, Bali and Java, as seen from the sea.J 112 • 

[This has a scale of leagues.] Fol. 113V. 

[The rectos of these bear maps of the Mediterranean and p 0 ls. 114- 
Black Sea.] -r-u>. 


F 


h.c.s. ir. 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


The Portuguese text is here faithfully repro- 
duced in the same order as it occurs in the 
Paris Codex; but the English version is printed 
in a different order, as explained in the Intro- 
duction, pp. xvii and Ixx-lxxii. 

The corresponding portion in the two 
languages may easily be found through the 
numeration of the folios given in the margin 
of both. 



O LIVRO DE 
FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 

ENMANUEL FoL2r - 

Jhus 

Fram^isquo Roiz 

Este liuro fez Fr co Roiz FoL 3r. 

PILLOTO MOOR DA PIMEIRA ARMADA 
QUE DESCOBRIO BAMDAM & MALLUQUO 

Framcisco Roiz 

[Royal crown surmounted by the upper part of a crowned dragon Fol, 4 r. 
with open wings.] 

Aas doze folhas achares os treze <pirquolos que por eles podes ssaber/ 
quallqr decrinacam q vos ffor necesairo//. 
t. As quatorze ffolhas Achares o Regimemto Da decina^am//. 
r. A dozassete a decrinacam/ 

r. Aas vimte Achares huma Agulha que vos dara A emtemder quamto 
vale cada grao /. & asy por ela podes tirar a decrinacam com hum 
compasso / 

r. Aas vimte duas Achares quamto vale cada grao 
r. Aas vimte & sejs ffolhas Achares a pimejra poma & nela Achares 
todo ponemte//. 

r. As vimte & sete Achares A Ilha da madeira & as caanarias & as 
Ilhas dos Acores ./ 

r. As vimte oito ffolhas Achares o cabo Vde & as suas Ylhas/. 
r. As vimte noue ffolhas Achares A Ilha dacemcam/. 
r. As trimta ffolhas Achares o brasyle./ &c 
r. As trimta & huma Achares a Ilha de ssamtome ec/ / ~ 
r. As trimta & duas Achares o cabo de boa esperamca. 
r. As trimta & tres Achares As Ilhas de tistam da cunha 
r. As trimta & quatro Achares cofallaa & as ilhas pmeiras & Mocam- 
biquei & asy a Jlha de sam louremco. 

307 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


308 

t. As trimta & sejs Achares mais o cabo de goardafuy. & A boca do 
estreito de mequaa .//. 

r. As trimta & sete achares ormuz//. & toda a costa da Jmdia & de 
cambaia .// 

r. Mais as trymta & oito Achares o cabo de comorym & a Jlha De 
9eilam & a trauessia que ha de ceilam Ate gamjspollaa; & De 
gamjspola ate melaquaa / . . . 


Fol. 5r. [Pen drawing of the Arms of Portugal with the quinas (escutcheons) 

but with only one castle. Below it, the signature Osorio 1 .] 

A duas legoas da pta do estreit 0 esta hum castelo ecyma de hum 
monte qe se quer pareger com palmela ahum a oeste dele podes 
sorgir e dez bracks e qualquer bamda q qizerdes se neho a Re£eo // 
ha muy bom pt° de ponete espremetado chamasse narham he todo o 
fumdo lympo // ha neste port 0 agoa esta hum tiro de bonbarda do 
mar// . €| a y lha q esta a porta do estreit 0 se chama a vera cruz esta e doze 
graos & dos terfos tornados e teRa// no meo dela te hum port 0 da 
bamda do sul a sua emtrada seis sete & oit° bra?as // pode neste porto 
por hua nao de duzetos tones por e momte// esta norte & sul com 
zeyla // ha daly a barbora tnta legoas & de barbora a ade ha outros 
Fol. 5v. tnta de norte | E sul & de zejla a ade ha qSrenta legoas esta nordeste 
sudueste com aade &. 


zejla esta e omze graos largos//da ylha da vera Cruz a zejla ha tnta 
legoas/ este porto desta ylha he muy bom de todolos ventos estares e 


Camynho 
qe fiz com 
Joham 
Gomez 
captam 
da cara- 
vela p a 
dalaca 


sejs & sete bra5as & n 5 veres por onde Entrastes tao bom he &//. 

Este he o camynho qe fizemos sayndo da ylha de feybam pa 
dalaq a // Fomos demandar 9eybam aloeste// & de 9eibam aloeste qnze 
legoas ou dezeseis fomos dar e hum baix° qe ha nelle tres ou qtro 
egoas I/ ha nele de largo dous ter90s de legoa Jaz noroeste sueste/ ha 
no mas alt 0 dele qatro bra9as & dy pa baix 0 ate huma & mea// os 
baixos deste bamqo sa de pedr a & darea & 0 mays baix 0 he na pSnta 
do sueste tomey o sol & achey q estava e qymze graos vimos adiante 
tres ylhas aloes noroeste// av a cymqo legoas a ellas e jaze leste & oeste 


1 This word, written in a later hand, is perhaps the signature of the famous 
Bishop D. Jeronimo Osorio (1506-80), probably a former owner of the codex. 
See Introduction, p. xv. and plate II. 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 309 

m t0 cerqa huuas das outras fomos a elas e meo deste camynho topa- 
mos outro bamqo q he de compdo mea legoa/ & de larg 0 tera huu 
tyr° de her go/ ha no mays baixo dele sejs brafas//. 

Esta ylha pmeira te por marca hua mat 3 darvores tamanha como 
huua nao & a par das arvores/ ha hua emsseada asy como a de 
camaram sena qe he muyt 0 apare?ellad 0 fomos | Ao lomguo dellas em Fol. 6 r. 
a dobramd 0 pa o noroeste tern dous momtes de pedra// dissenos o 
Roba mouro qe levavamos qe era p or to &.//. 

Dy fizemos nosso Camynho ao noroeste & a qart a daloeste por 
mandado do Robam pylot 0 mour 0 / ssurgimos aquela noute e qymze 
bra?as por nos acalmar o vemt 0 Aoutro d a pola menham/ achamonos 
cercados Dilhas de muytos baixos & Restimguas/ alevamtamonos por 
for^a por o vemto ser Rijo & gastamos todo o dia e balRavemtear// e 
sairmos datre aqelas ylhas nos ffffez ds muyt a merceee & Como 
ssaimos vimos a ylha de Dalaca q se nos Demoraua ao sul // aRibamos 
a ela por 9yma dum parcel de qatro & fimquo & seis bra?as como 
fomos tamt 0 avamte como a ponta da ylha achamos gramde fumdo & 
fomos ao lomguo da ylha q jaz leste & oeste ate hum ylhe 0 & sempre 
achamos gramde fumdo de vinte ate tnta bra9as / / Disse nosso Robam 
mour 0 q aviamos de passar antre o ylheo & a teRa srya isto ao sol 
post 0 semdo tant 0 avante como o ylheo// Fomos dar e duas bra9as 
supt °H demos fumdo/ fomos somdar com o batell ate q achamos hum 
P090 de sete bra9as/ onde posemos a caravela ate q veo o dia// 
alevamtamonos com o ponente nua volta & na outr a & n 5 pudemos 
ssayr daqle P090 de sete bra9as tornamos a surgir espamdo por vento 
larg 0 com o qual ssaymos por hum canal de duas bracas // deste ylheo 
ate o porto de delaq a ha duas llegoas // & ha sseys legoas a ponta por 
onde entramos a ylha de Dalaca/ Jaz leste & oeste ate o porto & do 
porto pa diante se vay lan9ando pa o nordeste. 

O fumdo qe ha na boca do port 0 de dalaqua he duas bra9as & mea Fol. 6 v. 
tres tres & m a / & bra9a & mea tudo ssam mamchas de pedra & darea// 
e meo do Canall a cymquo bracas & 9imquo & mea/ O canall he tarn 
Estreyt 0 qe nom podera emtrar demtro nehuua nao nossa gramde 
salv 0 com Rajeir 08 (?) p or p° p a A sua amcora pstes demtro no p or to 
ha tres bra9as ate Duas & m a & no ha hy nehuua segura9a salv 0 



3io 


FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


abalRoamd 0 huuas com os outros / ha Demtro luguar pa tres navios 
amaRados a qtr° amaRas c 5 estoutras tres naos Defym 08 / nom Ja 
per o porto n 5 ser gramde mas he tudo apeselad 0 qe no ha hy hum 
Palmo dagoa De baixa maar // de prea mar avera huua bra?a pou co 
mais ou menos/ De fora do porto a hum tiro de bombarda ha qorent a 
bra$as ?ymqoenta bra?as he tudo pedra// foy o captao e teRa ffallar 
com os mouros / etc/. 

Pguntamos ao Roboam mouro se saby a algu port 0 na teRa da 
abixya Respomdeo q nom ssaby a ssom te ouvira dizer qe ao noroeste 
avy a hum port 0 & qe punha dous dias e hir la Partimos dy & fomos 
coRemdo a costa da abixy 3, nove ou dez Dias se acharmos barco ne 
$apat° ne vimos rnanejr 3 De port 0 nem omde ouvesse desembar- 
ca?ao// Pguntamos ao Roboam mouro pelo Camynho verdadejr 0 qe 
as suas naos gramdes trazia de camaram pa dallaqa qe nos levasse a 
ele pa o avermos de ssaber // por seu mandado tornamos a v a ylha de 
dalaqa & dy fffizemos o camynho deleste ao longo Duua Restyngua 
qe nos fiquou Da bamda de bobord 0 & viemos Demandar as ylhas com 
q topamos pmeir 0 / / qe disse o Robam mour° q este era o Camynho 
pomde as suas naos gramdes vynha// viemos asy ate noute qe nos 
Fol. yr. acalmou o vemt 0 / ssurgimos e fffumdo de doze | Bra^as ate o outro 
dia qe demos vella & vimos huua ylha a sotavemto de nos qe nos 
demorava e lesueste// & disse o Robam mouro qe ao long 0 dela era 
nosso camynho da banda Do ssul/ & qamdo nos vimos Junto Dela/ 
come90use o mouro de fffffazer muyt° espantado qe nom era aqla a 
ylha por omde avyamos de vir & veo dar comnosco e hum pare9el por 
omde viemos mais de tres legoas ate q viemos dar nas ylhas pmeiras 
pomde foramos daly pa dalaq a // aves Dir aloeste & a qarta do 
noroeste hires duas legoas ate qe chegues ao Canal & daly hires aloeste 
por qeste piloto mouro qiserase bem escusar damostrar este camynho 
se podera & a9az trabalhou por ysso. 

A mym me par9eo qe o Camynho Verdadr 0 se ade fazer com vemto 
feit 0 asy pa naos grandes como pa peqenas/ porqe neste camynho 
achamos Dezesete ilhas afora gram cantidade de Restimguas & 
9ugidade & muytos parces // 

Neste capitollo abaxo espto achares o Regimento destes trrezee 


Fol. 8 v. 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


3 11 

cirquolos com o de flora./, o quail p eles podes tirar a decrinacam 
de quallqr dia quee vos ffor necessairo / polos doze cirquolos questam 
de demtro podes sabr o affastamemto & ho achegamemto que o 
ssoll ffaz da linha quanociall &. 

Primeiramemte Aves. De sabe pera terdes Vdadeiro conhecimemto 
destes cirquolos que aquy estam per ffigura vos he negesairo q 
tenhaes conhecimemto do mouymemto dos ceos/. porquee saberes 
que todo o ceeo he emMaginado por Respeito que em elle nam ha 
senam hum girquollo poisado /. o quail se chama Zodiaquo/ o quail 
he posto lesueste & oesnoroeste A Respeyto Do canogiall q he leste 
oeste & p ele ssam emmagynados todos os outros cirquolos da espera. 

Este zodiaquo he Repartido em trezemtos & sassemta graos asy como 
aquy vedes p ffegura./. & tern de largura doze graos & m° de leste a 
huma lynha que se chama lynha eclyquytaa p ela Aamdaa o ssoll hum 
gaao & as vezes Menos Estes ditos cirquolos sam a verdadeira lynha 
ecliquytaa postos em corpo pano como aquy por ffigura vedes/. & asy 
mesmo No dyto zodiaquo vam postos os doze synos & cada hum 
destes synos tern trymta gaos em que o soil esta trymta dias por 
Respeito que amda cada dia hum gaao & desta manejra Acaba seu 
cirquollo em hum Annno E asy mesmo neste zodiaquoo. hamdam as 
planetas/ & este zodiaquo ffaaz a degrinacpa .s. quamdo o soli estaa em 
aqueles synos/ & deles tern pouca Decrinacam & deles tem Muyta 
cada hum em sua cantydade Da decrinacam he os graaos q vam da 
linha pa a Mao debax 0 & Atrauessa polo meo Dos cirquolos/. & se 
quyserdes tirar a Decrinacam he vos Necessairo hum compasso & 
que vades a quern este ffez q volo emsynee/. ou A outrem porque 
doutra manejra volo nam posso Daar A emtemdeer// & 

Framcisquo/. Rooiz 

(Figure with planetary circles and Zodiac, with the inscription: Fol. gr. 

Domde ho ssoll precede Has claridades aos signos ee aos planetas 
asi aos superiores como aos Imferiores. La he allma do md.) 

quamdo qr que qujseres tomar Altura do soil/ toma la es ao meo Fol. xor. 
dia pumtualmemte & quamdo qr que A tomardes oulhares memtes 
De que parte he o ssoll./. se he da linha Canociall pa a bamda Do Stitts. 
ssull se pa a bamda do norte porque aves de ssabr que o ssoll Aamda 



312 FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 

. 6 . messes Da linha quanofiall pa a bamda do norte .s. domzee De 
mar?o ate quatorze De ssetembro. & de quatorze de De ssetembro. 
Ate omze de marfo Aamda da linha quano9iall pa a bamda do ssull./. 
& assy cada vez que A tomardes/. oulhares memtes de que parte he o 
ssoll & asy ffares vossa comta./. 

Quamdo qr que aehardes o ssoll amtre vos & a linha ffares esta 
comta adiamte espta/. 

Aves de sa£r que se o ssoll estiuer amtre vos & a linha aves de tirar 
a decrynagam daltura p esta manejra/. ponho per emxempro que 
tomastes daltura do ssoll./ ssatemta gaos/ oulhares memtes quamtos 
vos ffale9em pa noveta cres q vos ffaleceram vimte botares fora os 
ssatemta que tomastes daltura do soil & os vimte que vos ficam 
ajumtares com a decry na9am daquelle di em que estiuerdes & isso 
estares afastado da linha quanociaall. 

Se vos aehardes amtre A linha & o soli ffares esta comta adiamte 
esptaa /. 

Saberes se vos aehardes amtre A linha & soli tomares vossa altura 
com quadramte ou estrelabeo & A altura que tomardes ajumtares 
com a decryna9am daquele dya em que esteuerdes & os que ssobe- 
jarem de Nouemtaa esses estares affastado da linha quano9iall. 

SE a linha quano9iall fora amtre vos & o soil fares esta comta 
adiamte espta. 

Saberes se a linha quanociall ffor amtre vos & o soil tomares vossa 
altura ao meo dya pumtuallmemte./. & altura que tomardes ajum- 
tares com a decrynacam daquele dya em que esteuerdes & os que 
Fol. iov. fale9erem pa novemta aqueles estares affastado da linha quano9iall | 
E Se ffor coussa que tomardes Nouemta gaaos daltura Do ssoll & nam 
aehardes decryna9am Nenhuma naaquele dia em que esteuerdes/. 
ssaberes que vos & o ssoll Estais em a linhaa quano9iall & se alguma 
Decryna9am aehardes essa estares affastado da linha quano9iall & se 
ffor coussa que ajumtamdo vos A altura que tomastes com a decry- 
na9am daquele dya & aehardes Nouemta gaaos que nam aja mais 
Nem menos/. saberes q estais e a linha quanociall 

Framcisquo/ Roiz. 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


313 


Marso Abrill 


Dias 

Lugar 

GRaos 


Dias 

LlugaR 

graos 


Do 

do 

da defri- 

mee- 

Do 

do 

da de£ri- 

mee- 

mes 

soil. 

na£a 

nutos 

mes 

soil. 

na£am 

nutos 

I 

20 

3 

59 

1 

21 

8 

H 

2 

21 

3 

35 

2 

22 

8 

37 

3 

22 

3 

11 

3 

23 

8 

59 

4 

23 

2 

48 

4 

24 

9 

21 

5 

24 

2 

24 

5 

25 

9 

43 

6 

25 

2 

0 

6 

26 

10 

5 

7 

26 

1 

3 6 

7 

27 

10 

27 

8 

27 

1 

12 

8 

28 

10 

49 

9 

28 

0 

48 

9 

29 

11 

10 

10 

29 

0 

24 

10 

30 

11 

32 

11 

Aries 1 

0 

0 

1 1 taurus 1 

11 

53 

12 

2 

0 

24 

12 

2 

12 

14 

13 

3 

0 

48 

13 

3 

12 

34 

H 

4 

1 

12 

14 

4 

12 

55 

15 

S 

1 

3 6 

15 

5 

13 

15 

16 

6 

2 

0 

16 

6 

13 

35 

17 

6 

2 

24 

17 

6 

13 

45 

18 

7 

2 

48 

18 

7 

13 

55 

19 

8 

3 

11 

!9 

8 

H 

15 

20 

9 

3 

35 

20 

9 

H 

34 

21 

10 

3 

59 

21 

10 

14 

53 

22 

11 

4 

22 

22 

11 

15 

12 

23 

12 

4 

46 

23 

12 

15 

3 i 

24 

13 

5 

9 

24 

13 

15 

49 

25 

14 

5 

33 

25 

14 

16 

7 

26 

15 

5 

56 

26 

15 

16 

16 

27 

16 

6 

J 9 

27 

16 

16 

42 

28 

18 

6 

43 

28 

17 

i 7 

0 

29 

18 

7 

6 

29 

18 

17 

17 

3 ° 

19 

7 

29 

30 

19 

17 

34 

3 i 

20 

7 

5 1 






Fol . nr . 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


Fol . iiv . 


3*4 


Maio Junho 


Dias 

Lugar 

graos 


Dias 

lugar 

graos 


Do 

do 

da deci- 

mee 

Do 

do 

da decri- 

mee- 

mes 

soil 

nacam 

nutos 

mes 

soil 

nafam 

nutos 

I 

20 

17 

49 

I 

19 

23 

5 

2 

21 

18 

6 

2 

20 

23 

10 

3 

22 

18 

21 

3 

21 

23 

H 

4 

23 

18 

37 

4 

22 

23 

18 

5 

24 

18 

52 

5 

23 

23 

22 

6 

25 

19 

7 

6 

24 

23 

25 

7 

26 

19 

21 

7 

25 

23 

27 

8 

27 

19 

35 

8 

26 

23 

29 

9 

28 

19 

48 

9 

27 

23 

3 i 

10 

29 

20 

2 

10 

28 

23 

32 

11 

30 

20 

15 

11 

29 

23 

33 

12 geminys 1 

20 

27 

12 

30 

23 

33 

13 

2 

20 

39 

13 cancer 1 

23 

33 

J 4 

3 

20 

5 i 

H 

2 

23 

33 

r 5 

4 

21 

3 

15 

3 

23 

3 i 

16 

5 

21 

14 

16 

4 

23 

29 

17 

5 

21 

19 

17 

4 

23 

28 

18 

6 

21 

25 

18 

5 

23 

27 


7 

21 

35 

19 

6 

23 

25 

20 

8 

21 

45 

20 

7 

23 

22 

21 

9 

21 

54 

21 

8 

23 

18 

22 

10 

22 

3 

22 

9 

23 

H 

23 

11 

22 

12 

23 

10 

23 

10 

24 

12 

22 

20 

24 

11 

23 

5 

25 

13 

22 

38 

25 

12 

23 

0 

26 

H 

22 

35 

26 

J 3 

22 

55 

27 

iS 

22 

42 

27 

H 

22 

49 

28 

16 

22 

49 

28 

15 

22 

42 

29 

17 

22 

55 

29 

16 

22 

35 

30 

18 

23 

0 

30 

17 

22 

28 

31 

18 

23 

0 







PORTUGUESE TEXT 


3 J 5 


JULHO AgOSTO 


Dias 

llugar do 

graos 

dias 

lugar 

graos 


do 

do 

da decri- mee- 

do 

do 

da decri- 

mee- 

mes 

soil. 

na9am nutos 

mes 

soil 

nacam 

nutos 

I 

17 

22 

1 

17 

*5 

42 

2 

18 

22 

2 

18 

*5 

3 1 

3 

J 9 

22 

3 

!9 

*5 

12 

4 

20 

22 

4 

20 

14 

53 

5 

21 

21 

5 

21 

14 

34 

6 

22 

21 

6 

22 

14 

i 5 

7 

23 

21 

7 

23 

13 

55 

8 

24 

21 

8 

24 

!3 

35 

9 

25 

21 

9 

25 

13 

J 5 

10 

26 

21 

10 

26 

12 

55 

ii 

27 

20 

11 

27 

12 

34 

12 

28 

20 

12 

28 

12 

H 

J 3 

29 

20 

!3 

29 

II 

53 

H 

30 

20 

14 

30 

II 

32 

15 

lleeo/. 1 

20 

!5 Virgo. 1 

II 

10 

16 

2 

19 

16 

2 

10 

49 

17 

3 

19 

17 

2 

10 

3 8 

18 

4 

l 9 

18 

3 

10 

27 


5 

J 9 

!9 

4 

10 

5 

20 

6 

l8 

20 

5 

9 

43 

21 

7 

l8 

21 

6 

9 

21 

22 

8 

l8 

22 

7 

8 

59 

23 

9 

l8 

23 

8 

8 

37 

24 

10 

J 7 

24 

9 

8 

H 

25 

11 

17 

25 

10 

7 

5 1 

26 

12 

17 

26 

11 

7 

29 

27 

13 

17 

27 

12 

7 

6 

28 

H 

16 

28 

13 

6 

43 

29 

*5 

16 

29 

14 

6 

l 9 

30 

16 

16 

30 

l 5 

5 

5 6 

3 1 

17 

15 

31 

16 

5 

33 


Fol . I2r. 



3 1 6 


FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


Fol. I2V. 


Setembro/. Outubr 0 /. 


Dias 

lugar 

graos 


Dias 

llugar 

graos 


do 

do 

da decri- 

mee- 

do 

do 

da decri- 

mee- 

mes 

ssooll/ 

nagam 

nutos 

mes 

ssooll. 

nagam 

nutos 

I 

J 7 

5 

9 

I 

J 7 

6 

43 

2 

18 

4 

46 

2 

18 

7 

6 

3 

!9 

4 

22 

3 

J 9 

7 

29 

4 

20 

3 

59 

4 

20 

7 

5 i 

5 

21 

3 

35 

5 

21 

8 

H 

6 

22 

3 

11 

6 

22 

8 

37 

7 

23 

2 

48 

7 

23 

8 

59 

8 

24 

2 

24 

8 

24 

9 

21 

9 

25 

2 

0 

9 

25 

9 

43 

IO 

26 

1 

36 

10 

26 

10 

5 

ii 

27 

1 

12 

11 

27 

10 

27 

12 

28 

0 

48 

12 

28 

10 

49 

!3 

29 

0 

24 

J 3 

29 

11 

10 

14 

30 

0 

0 

!4 

30 

11 

32 

1 5 Libra. 1 

0 

34 

15 escorpius 1 

11 

53 

16 

2 

0 

48 

16 

2 

12 

14 

17 

3 

1 

12 

J 7 

3 

12 

34 

18 

4 

1 

36 

18 

4 

12 

55 

!9 

5 

2 

0 

19 

5 

13 

J 5 

20 

6 

2 

24 

20 

6 

*3 

35 

21 

7 

2 

48 

21 

7 

!3 

55 

22 

8 

3 

11 

22 

8 

H 

15 

23 

9 

3 

35 

23 

9 

H 

34 

24 

10 

3 

59 

24 

10 

H 

53 

25 

11 

4 

22 

25 

11 

*5 

12 

26 

12 

4 

46 

26 

12 

15 

3 i 

27 

13 

5 

9 

27 

J 3 

15 

49 

28 

14 

5 

33 

28 

H 

16 

7 

29 

15 

5 

56 

29 

*5 

16 

26 

30 

16 

6 

J 9 

30 

16 

16 

42 





3 1 

!7 

J 7 

0 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


317 


Nouembr 0 Dezembro. poi 


Dias 

Lugar 

graos 


Dias 

Lugar 

graos 


Do 

do 

da decri- 

mee- 

Do 

do 

da decri- 

mee- 

mes 

soil. 

na^am 

nutos 

mes 

soil. 

nacam 

nutos 

I 

18 

17 

!7 

I 

18 

33 

0 

2 

J 9 

!7 

33 

2 

19 

33 

5 

3 

20 

!7 

49 

3 

20 

33 

10 

4 

21 

18 

6 

4 

21 

33 

H 

5 

22 

18 

21 

5 

22 

33 

18 

6 

23 

18 

37 

6 

23 

33 

22 

7 

24 

18 

52 

7 

24 

33 

25 

8 

25 

J 9 

7 

8 

25 

33 

27 

9 

26 

J 9 

21 

9 

26 

33 

29 

10 

27 

J 9 

35 

10 

27 

33 

3 1 

11 

28 

J 9 

48 

11 

28 

33 

32 

12 

29 

20 

2 

12 

29 

33 

33 

13 

30 

20 

*5 

n «pn- ! 
cornios A 

33 

33 

14 

ssagi- 
tarios. 1 

20 

27 

H 

2 

33 

32 

J 5 

2 

20 

39 

15 

3 

33 

3 i 

16 

3 

20 

5 1 

16 

4 

33 

29 

17 

4 

21 

3 

17 

5 

33 

27 

18 

5 

21 

H 

18 

6 

33 

25 

r 9 

6 

21 

25 

r 9 

7 

33 

22 

20 

7 

21 

35 

20 

8 

33 

18 

21 

8 

21 

45 

21 

9 

33 

H 

22 

9 

21 

54 

22 

10 

33 

10 

23 

10 

22 

3 

23 

11 

33 

5 

24 

11 

22 

12 

24 

12 

33 

0 

25 

12 

22 

20 

25 

13 

32 

55 

26 

J 3 

22 

28 

26 

14 

32 

49 

27 

J 4 

22 

35 

27 

r 5 

32 

42 

28 

15 

22 

42 

28 

16 

32 

35 

29 

16 

22 

49 

29 

r 7 

32 

28 

3 ° 

J 7 

22 

55 

3 ° 

18 

32 

20 





3 i 

19 

32 

12 



3i8 


FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


Fol. 13V 


Janejro/. Feuereiro / 


dias 

llugar 

graos 


Dias 

llugar 

graos 


do 

do 

da decri- 


Do 

do 

da decri- 

mee- 

mes 

ssooll. 

na 5 ao 


mes 

ssooll. 

nayam 

nutos 

I 

20 

22 

3 

I 

22 

H 

15 

2 

21 

21 

54 

2 

23 

13 

55 

3 

22 

21 

45 

3 

24 

13 

35 

4 

23 

21 

35 

4 

25 

13 

15 

5 

24 

21 

25 

5 

26 

12 

55 

6 

25 

21 

14 

6 

27 

12 

34 

7 

26 

21 

3 

7 

28 

12 


8 

27 

20 

5 i 

8 

29 

II 

53 

9 

28 

20 

39 

9 

30 

II 

32 

10 

29 

20 

27 

10 Pifis 1 

II 

10 

11 Acarius 1 

20 

J 5 

11 

2 

10 

49 

12 

2 

!9 

48 

12 

3 

10 

27 


3 

r 9 

35 

13 

4 

10 

5 

14 

4 

19 

21 

14 

5 

9 

43 

r S 

5 

19 

7 

15 

6 

9 

21 

16 

6 

l8 

52 

16 

7 

8 

59 

17 

7 

l8 

37 

17 

8 

8 

37 

18 

8 

l8 

21 

18 

9 

8 

H 

r 9 

9 

l8 

6 

19 

10 

7 

5 i 

20 

10 

J 7 

49 

20 

11 

7 

29 

21 

11 

17 

33 

21 

12 

7 

6 

22 

12 

17 

17 

22 

13 

6 

43 

23 

13 

17 

0 

23 

H 

6 

19 

24 

H 

l6 

42 

24 

15 

5 

56 

25 

*5 

l6 

25 

25 

16 

5 

33 

26 

16 

l6 

7 

26 

J 7 

5 

9 

27 

17 

!5 

49 

27 

18 

4 

46 

28 

18 

*5 

3 i 

28 

!9 

4 

22 

29 

19 

J 5 

12 

29 

20 

3 

59 

30 

20 

14 

53 





3 i 

21 

H 

34 







PORTUGUESE TEXT 


(A compass rose for measuring a degree in leagues, corresponding 
to the Regimento on the next folio.) 

Cj[ linha dereita de norte & sul val cada grao 17. legoas & m a . 

CJ pela pmeira quart 3, amdas por grao 1 9. legoas & mea 
€| pela pmeira mea partida qe ssa duas quartas amdaras por grao .21. 
legoas & mea/ 

Cfl pelas pmeiras tres quartas amdaras por grao .23. legoas & m a 
IJ fazemdo o camynho pelo Rumo de nordeste sudueste amdaras por 
grao 25. legoas 

CJ fazemdo o camynh 0 polas 9ymq° quartas amdaras por grao trymta 
& duas legoas & mea 

CJ fazemdo o camynho polas seys quartas amdaras por gra° qoremta 
& seis legoas & mea / /. 

<| fazemdo o camynho polas sete quartas amdaras por gra° novemta 
legoas & mea / /. 

CJ Sesemta meudos // ffazem hu grao/ / 

Capitollo de huu quarto dagulha Pera Saberdes quamto vaall./ cada 
grao & per elle podes SabR todollos outros/ 

Navegamdo Norte & sull Respomde o grao dezasejs leguoas) 

& dous tercos & em cada legoa se momtam. tres meu- > - .i6/| 
dos & trymta & sej s segumdos // . J 

Navegamdo ao norte & a quarta do nordeste Respomde o') 
grao. Dezasete leguoas & em cada leguo. se momtam I _ 
tres meudos & trymta & hum segumdo & quoremta & j 
9imq° ter90s & 9inq°emta & tres quartos / /. J 

Navegamdo ao nornordeste Respomde o grao dozoito legoas) 

& em cada legoa se momta tres Meudos & vimte V -.18. 
segumdos J 

Navegamdo Ao nordeste & A quarta do norte Respomde o) 

grao vimte leguoas & em cada legoa se momta tres J- - .20. 
meudos//- J 

Navegamdo Ao nordeste Respomde o graao vimte & quatro) 

leguoas & em cada leguoa se momtam dous Meudos & J- - .24. 
T rymta segumdos / . J 

Navegamdo Ao nordeste & A quarta de leste Respomde o) 

grao trymta legoas & em cadal eguoa se momtam dous J- - .30. 
meudos J 

Navegamdo em lesnordeste Respomde o graao quoremta &' 

huma legoa & m a & em cada legoa se momtam vimte & J- - .41 . 
sejs segumdos & quoremta & quatro ter90s/ /. 


-.20. 


- .24. 


-.30. 


-.41. 



Fol. ijr. 

Fols. 

18-30. 

Fob. 3ir. 
and 32r. 

Fob. 

33 ~ 4 2 ' 


Fol. 37v. 


Fob. 

43 - 85 . 


Fol. 86r. 


320 FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 

Navegamdo em leste & a quarta De nordeste Respomde o 
graao / oitemta & tres legoas & em cada leguoa se m3 tarn 
quoremta & tres segumdos & vimte & quatro ter?os & 
vimte & quatro quartos// 

E toda esta comta Achares. mais embre em huua Agulha que 
Atras vos fica/. 

(System of wind-roses prepared for a map which was never drawn.) 

(The recto of each of these folios bears a map.) 

(Wind-rose in the centre and scale of leagues on the left, for a map 
which was never drawn.) 

(The recto of each of these folios bears a map.) 

CAMYNHO DA CHYNA 

De malaqa a pulo param a cymqo Jaas & daly a pifao outros cymqo 
& de pulo pi?am a carymam tres Jaas & de caryman a syngapura 
?mqo & de singapura a pedra bramca finqo & de apulo tymge 9inqo 
Jaas / ao nordeste & per este camynho outros finqo Jaaos a vjoma & 
de pulo vioma a pulo condor qorenta & finqo Jaaos polo norte & a 
quarta do nordeste & de pulo comdor a terra de champara trra 
vermelha qimze Jaaos ao nordeste & desta terra vmelha ao lomgo da 
costa ate a pomta da berela qatorze Jaaos ao nordeste & da berela a 
pulo cotom doze Jaaos plo dito camynho & de pulo cotom a aynam 
vinte & finqo Jaaos ao nordeste & daquy a pulo cotom vinte Jaaos 
ao nordeste & pera partires de pulo cotom derejt 0 a barraa de timom 
as dir ao nordeste & teras sempre leste porqe as coRemtes te no 
lantern na emsseada de cauchy &//. 

(The rectos of these folios have drawings showing the northern 
part of Ilha de sollor, Solloto, Ilha de Samademga and Ilha de 
symbaua as seen from the sea.) 

O graao que achardes sobre os graaos de quail qr dos synoos: Das 
quatro tauoas em tarn teres o verdadeiro lugaar do soil & por escusar 
trabalho & Reteficacam de huma tauoaa. A quail achares na tauoa Da 
decryna9am a maao Direjta Na quail se mostra aquylo que avemos 
Dac9re9emtaar em cada huma Das ditas Rovula95es que Am de vir./. 
& poor q isto seja mais decrarado/ A quern o leer/, quero por por 




PORTUGUESE TEXT 


321 


ffegura este emxempro / que sabermos o Vdadeyro lugar: Do soli .ss 
do amno Do nacimemto de nosso semnor Jhuus Xpo de .1. 5.2.0. 
annnos/ Aos .1.5. dias do mees De marco & tirares dos ditos .1. 5.2.0. 
a Raiz das tauoas que sam .1. 5.0.8. amnos de maneyra que fficam .12. 
amnos. Dos quaes tirares todolos quatro quamtos Achares & fficar 
uos ham Na maao quatro amnos o quail vos amostrara que Aves 
Demtrar Na quarta tauoaa/ Do ssoll/ & emtam depois q emtrardes Na 
quarta tauoaa Aquele dia propiamemte .ss. a .15. dias de margo 
Achares que o soil esta em quatroo graaos & 53 meudos & .31. 
segumdos/. os quaes sam p tres Reuolugoes do ssoll/ que ssam 
passados segumdo. ho veres Na tauoa em direjto das .3. Reuolugoes/ 
& des quee ho Achardes dires Vdadeiramemte que o soil esta em 4 
gaos & .5.3. meudos & .3.1. segumdos & teram da deginacam .2. /. 
Dous graaos & .20. meudos/. Asde ssafir que por amor Da decraragam 
te quero amostraar como Vdadeyramemte conhegas Da parte domde 
o soil Aamdaar quer sejam Nos synos Da parte do norte qr nos synos 
Da parte do sull/ oulharas com huma agulhaa que seja Vdadeira/ 
omde qr q se Alevamtaar o soil/, em quallqr tempo que seja/ & se se 
o soli alevamtaar em leste sera emtam o soil na metadee Da linha 
quanogiall/ & se o soli tomaar Da quarta do nordeste. saberes quee o 
ssoll esta no syno Da parte do norte/ & se o ssoll tomaar da quarta do 
ssueste/ sera o ssoll no syno da parte Do sull.//. 

CAPITOLLO PERA DAR AEMTEMDER/. COMO AUES DE 
NAUEGAR POR AS SOMBAS/. 

Aves de sabr se qujgerdes sabr em quallqr parte que esteuerdes asy 
no maar como Na tera quamto estais affastado do quaanogiall da 
parte do norte ou da parte do sull/ ou asy se estais Debaxo dela polla 
altura do ssoll saberes q vos he Necessairo que tomes prmejro Altura 
do soil com estrelabeo ou quadramte Ao meo dia pumtualmente/ & 
quamdo o ssoll ffor empynado. & tomares .8. graaos ou mais ou 
Menos / & depois daltura tomadaa oulhares quamto vos mymgam pa 
•90. emtam hyuos ate o que temdes Dee Deccrinagam Do ssoll./ em 
direjto daquele Mes achares em que graao do syno esta o ssoll & 

g H.C.S. 11. 



322 


FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


Fol. 86v, 


Fols. 

87-112. 

Fol. 113V , 

Fols. 
114-116 . 


quamto tem emtam. De decrinagam emtam Ajumtares os graaos & 
meudds quee q vos mymgoa | .pa .90. & mais ajumtares o quee ouver 
Aquele dia decrinacam. & aqujlo estares affastado do equanoyiall por 
Respeito q a ssombra vaay ao norte & asy mesmo o ssoll esta nos 
synos da parte do norte & se isto for desdos .11. de mar^o ate os .14. 
de setembro. q em este tempo o ssoll estaa Nos .6. synos que estam 
do equanofiall pa a bamda do norte/. emtam ffares A comta como 
Dito he por amor da ssombra q vaay Ao norte/ & se per vemtura vos 
acomte9er que Naueegardes Ao sull do equanociall: aves De sabr que 
quamdo o ssoll esteuer nos outros .6. synos Da parte do ssull & vos 
ffizer a sombra da parte do ssull fares da propiaa manejraa quee 
ffizestes nos outros synos do norte .ss. desnee .14. de ssetembro ate 
.11. de mar50 que entam o soil estaa nos .6. synos da bamda do sull / 
& por este Respeito tee ffaaz a ssombraa Ao ssull / & pa mais de- 
crara9am disto te ponho aquy este emxempro / & diguo nesta manejra 
que Aos xx dias do mes dagosto tomastes o soli em sassemtaa & .5. 
gaaos daltura / & a ssombra emtam Vaay Ao norte/. emtam oulhares o 
que vos ffalecem pa Nouemtaa'/. os quaaes sam. xxb graaos/ emtam 
hyuos A tauoa’/ & oulhares memtes Naaquele diaa quamtos graos & 
meudos tem a deccrina9am & ajunta los es com os xxb. graaos & 
ffeita muyto bem toda A comta. Aqujlo estares apartado Do equano- 
ciall. da bamda Do norte. & se casso for que em este dito diaa / te 
ffizer a ssombra o ssull & tomares os ditos graaos/. emtam Accre- 
cemtares os graaos & meudos Da deecrina9am Daquele dia ssobre A 
altura que tomastes & a somaa ffeita & nam achamdo & nam achamdo 
a novemta Aqueles que nam achegam a Nouemtaa estares apartado 
do equano9iall'/. da parte do sull’/ por Respeito que emtam vos ffaaz 
a sombra Ao ssull ecte. 

(The rectos of these folios have drawings showing the northern 
part of Lombok, Bali and Java, as seen from the sea.) 

(Has a scale of leagues.) 

(The rectos of these bear maps of the Mediterranean and Black 
Sea.) 



A SUMA ORIENTAL 
DE TOME PIRES 

Ao muy Serenisymo primcepe muy alto & muy Foi. ii7r. 
poderoso Rey ELRRRey noso Sor comesa ho pro- 
loguo sobre a suma oriemtall//. 

N ATURALL memte os homees desejam saber como o 
testefiq a o mestre da filosofya asy tem este desejo promto E 
mais feruemte cada huu segumdo lhe conuem / nom sem 
merito hee que maior o tenha vosa Reall magestade que nenhuu out 0 
primcepe no mumdo poys seus senhorios sam maiores / quem ynora 
serem do primcipyo dafriq a athee os chys em que se comtem toda 
afriq a & asya & parte da europ a pola bamda do maar 05eano com 
Jmfinjdade dilhas muy gramdes Riquos & muy populosos em suas 
comfromta9oees em os qees snurios se contem mujtas proujncias he 
gram suma De Reynos multidam de Regiooes de que tudo vosa Reall 
altez a he Sor com fermosas e espunaues fortalezas com muyta gemte 
Artelharias e ixer^ifios de guerra na terra sojugamdo Regnos nas 
gemas da mourama '/ as armadas q traz quem doujda serem as morees 
do mundo que continoada memte amdam abastadas huuas na arabia 
outras na primeira Jmdija outras na segumda & na ter£ ra em tamto 
que em todo seu Srio nenguem nom he poderoso navegar sem sua 
licenga & os mouros tarn atemorizados amdam nos cabos como no 
meio cousa por certo dina de gramde glloria que tam gramdes Reis 
& Ses como sam os desta comqsta comuem a saber o soldam do cairo 
o Rey dadem o Rey durmuz o xequesmaell. ou sofy homem memtado 
no mundo os naitaques Resputes cambaia daquem a Jmdya do 
malabar A proujm^ia de choromamdell. E quelijs o Reino dorixa de 
bengala Racau Peguu Siaoo queda. malaq a pahaoo talimganor patane 
terraoo odia caboy a cauchi china a china com todallas Jlhas gemtes 
poderosas asy no maar como na terra’/ comtra todos estes traz vosa 
alteza guerra levamtamdo suas bamdeiras e suas terras polio nome de 
noso Sor Jhuu xpo de todos estes os que sam vasallos viuem asosegada 

323 



TOMl£ PIRES 


324 

memte & os que sam Reuees amdam atemorizados atormemtados E 
curam mais de sse fazer fortes que de cometer formas com suas 
armadas tudo yso causa o gramde poder que vosa alteza q a traz 
eixercitado & guerreado polio muy manifiquo E Jngemte cavaleiro 
afonsso dalboquerq e seu capitam geeraall anjmosso astu9ioso pro- 
videmte na guerra E no all vmano prudemtisymo que comtinoada 
memte com tamto trabalho ora na Jndia alta ora na arabia & no meio 
nom 9esa guerreamdo o nome de mafamede/ craro he que ha ony- 
potemcia de 3 s fauorece Jsto que qujs aReiguar a xpidade em uosos 
Reinos //. E que estas cousas se facam com Jmmesas despesas quaees 
nunq a teue Rey xpaao por serem comtinoada memte. tudo se deue 
dauer por bem gastado por ser cousa que tamto eixal^a acrecemta & 
aumenta nosa samta fee. catolliq a & q tamto abatimemto perda E 
dapno traz a fallsa opiniom diaboliq a do nefamdo Jmnomjniosso 
fallsso mafamede cabe9a de toda vaa Relegiam mourisqua do quail 
vosa alteza tern gramde fama & omrra no mundo acerqua dos prim9e- 
pes E diamte do muy allto ds Jmfymdo mere9imemto que estas coussas 
tem magnifiqua memte comecadas meadas E quasy acabadas //. 
Prohemjo Pollas quaees cousas que bem avemturada memte so9edem ocupado 

primeiro/. eu em car g U0S a q ue v jj m aas Jradijas E out°s que me qua forom 

dados de muyto trabalho desejau a q se me ofre9ese tempo ociosso em 
que podese escreuer alguua cousa verdadeira q aproueitase pa o 
pasar do tempo em que se lleese detremjnei de poor em obra esta suma 
oriemtall. E comecar do maar Roxo ou arabico athee os chijs com 
todas as Jlhas & desviarme da parte dafriq a por serem cousas mais 
notorias em a qall suma nom me emtremeto com temerarja ousadija 
porque terja menos modestia mas pedimdo que nas cousas em que 
nom for achado despeso seja Releuado por que meu jmtemto foy 
moujdo a booa fee por veer cousas tarn gramdes he salua ha paz 
dallguus que escreuerom sse deujam vijr alimpar de seus tratados 
onesta cousa me pareceo poor em escpto alguua parte de tamta 
gloria/ quern fose tarn bravo(?) que tiuese o Jmtemto greguo E a 
Fol. uyv. limguoa Romaa. E o despejo betiquo pa | Falar em cousas tarn 
simplez tambem auemturadas como sam as oriemtaees/ mas como eu 
seja lusitano E baixo na gemte plebea cujo custume he dizer menos 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


325 

suas glias Do que sam & o mall mais do que he E por que o compor 
das sumas ou tratados he majs oficio destramgeiros que de naturaes 
por saberem adogar suas composygoees como vemos falarem mara- 
ujlhas nas cousas do maar mjditeranjo pasagem de xv dias sempre a 
vista de terra, que fizerom se virom a famosa comqista do oriemte 
de todo o maar ogeano domde se comtem cousas tao Dynas de 
memoria asy domrra acerq 3, dos homees como em merecimemto 
Acerq a de Ds se esta suma nom for asij pdderosa como conuem 
Remeta e ser naturall em outra arte q pa o tempo apremdy de que 
poderia dar melhor comta porque a necesydade me foy niso mais 
potemte que nesta obra a Rezam/ 

Se dos trogloditas E gemtes que matarom o VisoRey tiuera a prohemjo 
velocidade pa caminhar & ver como tiue a diligemcia de emquerir o segumt * 0 ' 
q nom vy nom fora maravilha. mais copiosa ser esta brebe suma asy 
que quererme meter na medida da terra, pola bamda do maar 
ogiano quern quer se poderja Rijr de mjm por me meter e vijnha 
alhea. & fora de mjnha comdicam mas eu vemdo que os homees 
falam nas cousas alheas sem serem Repremdidos menos culpa me 
paregeo que emcurria falar nas mjnhas/ por que do q quero falar srio 
he de uosa altez a e eu seu naturall a Rezam despeuer eu atenhoseme 
ajudase o que compre/ se nom falar destimtam te como comvem 
mjnha he a culpa, poijs nom sey dar Rezam de mjnha casa. he nesta 
suma nom somemte falarej da Repartigam Das ptes provygias 
Regnds Regioees & de suas comfromtacoees mas ajmda do tracto E 
comergio que humas tern com out a s o quail trato de mercadoria he 
tarn negesario que sem elle nom se sosteria o mundo este he o q 
nobrece os Regnos que faz gramdes as Jemtes & nobelita as gidades & 
o q faz a guerra & a paaz / No mundo he abito o da mercadoria limpo 
Nom falo no meneo dela avido em estima q cousa pode ser melhor 
que a que tem por fumdamemto a Vrdade/ o papa Paullo segumdo/ 
mercador foy primeiro E nom se desprezaua do tempo que nela 
gastou & os sabedores datenas por maravilhosa cousa a louuarom & 
oje em dia e toda a Redomdez a se custuma. he mayor memte nestas 
ptes he avida em prego estimada em tamto q hos gramdes nom 
custuma q a em out a s cousas ptiqar senom nela he gostosa neces- 



phemjo 
terceiro 
na Re- 
particam 


Fol. n8r. 


Deujsam 
da pre- 
semte 
suma. 


326 TOME PIRES 

aria conuenjemte senom teuese Reveses os quaees a fazem majs 
estimada // 

Comedo segimdo o que se cada dia custuma que se acha em todo 
oficio que prym r0 medem as obras & despois as cortam a pressemte 
suma sera gizada De cimqo Rijos primgipaes/ o njllo/ o tigris 
eufratees Jmdus & o gamges os qees sam nesta parte Dasya. o njllo 
deujde africa dasija E a persija dos arabios athee. o tigris Do tigris atee 
o eufrates a provymgia dos persas naytaques/ Do eufrates athe o Jmdo 
os Resputes | Cambaia daquem guoa do Jmdo ao gamges a Jmdia do 
malabar & a proujmcia da quelijs em que emtra o Reyno dorixa ho 
ganges faz duas bocas huma em canboja E a outra em bemgala que 
comtem em sy muytos Reinos como se ao diamte Dira & despois de 
Camboja athee a china tratarsea do nacimemto de cada Rijo E sera a 
presemte suma deujdida em cimq 0 liuros./. o primeiro sera das arabias 
egipto psya athee cambaia o ssegundo sera de cambaia athee batiqla o 
terceiro sera de batiqalla athee bemgalla. o quarto sera de bemgala 
athee os chijs 0 qujmto sera de todalas Jlhas e sera a suma acabada// 

Comuenyemte me paregeo a presemte obra segijr o estillo macanico 
que quaallqr artifige vsa. em ssuas obras gizar emtam cortar deuidese 
a suma oriemtall. em quatro partes ou liuros a primeira sera do 
pincipio dasya. apartamdose Dafrica athee a primeira Jmdija '/ o 
segumdo sera da Jmdia pm ra a thoda (?) Jmdija meyaa o terceiro sera 
da Jmdia alta alem do gamges que sse acaba em odija o quarto Sera do 
Reyno dos chijs & das proujmgias a elle sogeitas com a nobre ylha dos 
lequeos Janpon burnej & os lugoees macaceres o qimto sera de 
todalas Jlhas particular memte deujdimdo asya pllos Rijos primci- 
paees Damdo nacimemto & fym a cada huu. & se na tall deujsaoo 
parecer alguua cousa superflua ou mjmgoada ou Discrepamte a 
cosmogija fradansellmo E tolomeu E out°s nom parega noujdade por 
que os taees mais por nouas que por ptiq a o sentirom nos q a tudo 
pasamos espememtamos & vemos & se esta Rezam nom for acep- 
tauell deuese comsyderar q ho xastre em pequeno campo mujtas 
vezes nom acerta os talhos quamto mais defecultosso sera em camynho 
tarn estemdido/ nom me apartarey de culpa de quail qr descujdo que 
eu tiuer em nom falar asy destimto como comuem por que em 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


327 

cousas de faz da de uosa altz a em que era emcareguado me eixercitaua 
o primcipall tenpo he este desta obra era o de benese como se vera 
pllo Recemceam t0 das contas que em malaq a tomey E dos carguos 
da feitoria tudo por mamdado do capitam geerall que a jsso me mam- 
dou por seruifo de uosa altez a de que fiz mais estemdidas leituras //. 



Fol. n8v. 


SUMA ORIENT ALL 


que trata do maar Roxo athee os chijs 
copilada por thome piz. 1 


LLIURO PRIMEIRO 


Repar - 
tifam 
dasya com 
africa./. 


tiaci- 
memto 
do njUo 


Abixia. 


^SIA apartase dafrica polla bamda do maar mjditeranjo por 
/ % alexamdria he da pte do levamte pllo Rio njllo E do maar 
jl oceano pllo meio dia segumdo a tall Reparticam se aparta da 
ethiopia abixia por ela & arabia felix 

o njllo Rijo primeiro & mui primcipall traz seu nacimemto do 
cabo de boaa esperam9a. E vem por meio da abixia em Rijos nom 
gramdes no fim dabixia Jumto com arabia felix se faz navegauell. 
pasa com ligeiro curso a egipto vayse ao maar mediteranjo deujdido 
por bra?os dos qees ho principall he damjata pasa easy mea leguoa da 
cidade do cairo em Julho E agosto crefe he Regua a terra & as gemtes 
q viuem ha beira do Rijo vam aos altos com seu guaado & fazemdas & 
como lhe ha augua daa lugar que come^ a sequar semeam de 
setembro p diante. Dizem os de epipto que este milagre precede dos 
abixijs gemtes xpaas pllo quail sam framcos em toda a terra do soil- 
dam Sc sam estimados Dabixia core o Rijo vij olemtamemte & nom he 
bom de naveguar pa comtra abixia./. 

comfina Abixia da bamda do maar Roxo com aRabija felix. da bamda 
do maar o^iano des guardafuy athe tamto como gofala nom se chegua 
ao maar com sesemta leguoas da bamda dafri£a com os desertos & 
com parte Da ethiopija. sam xstaaos tern gramde terra & Jemte 
guerreira mercamtivell dela‘ i ha mamtimemtos ouro em sua trra nom 
tern port os no maar vem fazer seus tratos em zeila he barbora. E 
demtro no estreito nos portos Darabija. sam estas Jemtes come- 
meradas amtre os ethiopes todos sam de cabello Reuollto ferrados na 


1 On the top left-hand side of this page are the words: ‘Libro primeiro da 
swrniti OrUr.tnl discripssao das tres Arabias, felliz, Petrea dezerta, egipto, 
Persia, arte Cambaja & do grao Cairo e Soldao.’ (First book of the Suma 
Oriental, description of the three Arabias, Felix, Petrea and Deserta, Egypt, 
Persia, up to Cambay, and from the great Cairo and Sultan [of Egypt]). From 
the ink and the writing, this note would appear to have been written by the 
same hand as the word 'Osorio’ on fol. 5r. 

328 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


3 2 9 

testa em lugar de bautismo tem sagerdotes patriarcas & out°s Religio- 

sos/ Vam a Jerusalem E a momte Synaa em Romarias cadano/ sam avi- 

dos nestas partes por leaees Vedad°s fiees cavaleiros & muytas vezes es- 

tes semdo estpauos vem ser Reis primcipall memte em bemgalla // 

Dadem de xar de fartaq de dalaq a he cuaquem tratam com estes 

abexijs valem na abexia aguoa Rosada Rosas sequas matamimguo 

panos baixos de cambaia E alguus de sseda comtas de toda sorte 

cristalino panos bramqos tamaras e fardos amfijaoo / 

ouro marfim cavallos espauos mamtimemtos &c. Merca- 

conuenjemte he que daqui se fafa noso Recomtamemto athee os dorias 

dabixia. 

chijs polla parte dasya pola bamda do noso maar ofiano vaa toda 
medida & RecontaDa tem este maar tres nomees maar Roxo mar II 9 r - 
arabiq 0 estreito De mequa / maar Roxo porque demtro no cabo Junto Maar 
com $uez sam as barreiras Vrmelhas maar arabiq 0 porque jaz R° xo - 
cerq a do dos arabios estreito de mequa por que demtro nele jaz 
mequa casa de Romaria Dos mouros donde foy naturall seu ma- 
famede mas o majs propijo nome he arabiquo/. 

Da porta deste estreito pa demtro athee ?uez he cerq a do este maar medida 
de quatro prouij?ias da bamda do leuamte jaz arabia petrea da bamda 
dabixia jaz a felix chega atee tamto como as ylhas de dalaq a a petrea 
easy a meq a / da meca ao toro comeca arabia deserta eesta vay cami- 
nho do maar mediteranjo he deujde a proujmeia De egipto da terra 
de Judea do toro & de dalaca he provim 5 ia De egipto .s. toma a pomta 
ou easy terceira parte do estreito tera este estreito em Roda '//• 
todo ho estreito he cerq a do das terras ssusoditas E easy tudo he 
deserto he desabitado he trra escaluada ssem fruto todo aRedor em 
sij tem alguuas ylhas pouoadas pouq 0 asij como camaram dalaca 
acuaquem que demtro nele estam demtro neste estreito ha mujta 
pedra Restinguas he maao de navegar nom navegam senom de dia. 
sempre podem ancorar Da boq a do estreito athee camaram he a 
melhor navegacam /. Ja he pior de camaram a Judaa*/ & mujto peor 
de Juda ao toro/ do toro a suez he pasagem De barcos ajmda de 
dia de m na q todo he $ujo & maao'/- tem este estreito vemtos quemtes 
que quail quer cousa que morre asy homem como anjmall nom 
comsemte podridam mas secase & destas partes se leuam destes 
anjmaees a nosas partes por momja a quail nom he que a momja 



Fol. ugv. 

Proujm- 
fia De 
egipto. 


homde 
esta o 
solldam. 


33 ° TOME PIRES 

he a vmjdade que corre dos corpos despois que estam abalsamados 
co aloees cecotrino E mjrra. asy que o licor que de nosa carne mana 
he destes materiaees se chama momja. 

A terra de egipto comeca do maar mediteranjo he vem tomar pte 
do estreito De meqa de huua parte a diujde africa & da out ra arabia 
deserta de Judea toda he terra que se semea com acrecemte Do njllo 
& isto majs do cairo pa noso maar mediteranjo que do cairo pa o 
estreito he terra desaproueitada mas caminhase com menos trabalho 
que ha deserta ha nesta provim^ia a cidade de tebas em que se faz 
opio tebaiqo que qua chamam afiam cousa mujto vsada q a comerse he 
em nosa terra mata nesta terra de egito nom choue saluo dano em 
anno ou De dous em dous huu dia ou menos hee aguoa que choue 
quemte. E nam aproueita pa se aproveitarem da terra quamdo o 
njllo crece tomam auga em a?eqos pa despois Regarem as ortas toda 
esta proujmcia he mjngoada daug a 

De toda esta terra a mais pimcipall cidade he o cairo esta nela 
comtinoadamemte o solldam tem mujtos espauos que o gardam 
mamaluquos q na limguoagem da terra quer dizer gemte comprada 
por dr° estes seram athee fimco mjll. E tem a guarda de sua p a sam 
ha moor parte deles aReneguados que forom xpaaos. tem gramde 
copia de molheres nunca saee de casa nem he visto dos da cidade tem 
gouemadores Da Justica que poucas vezes a fazem estes mamaluquos 
como se agastam do soldam emlegem huu pa o carguo & matam outro 
hade ser aRenegado E dizem que ysto se fez porque os xpaaos 
aRenegasem pa poderem alcam^ar a dinjdade o que pode ser / nom 
herda f° nem paremte mas pola maneira dita socedem hade ser 
xstaoo aReneguado E quamtas majs vezes vemdido tamto tem mais 
pte no Regno sam mujto pobres os soldaees do cairo & mor m tr 
aguora chamanse os do Regno nestas partes ma^arijs//.. 

este em toda sua proujmcia nom tem Rey somemte capitaees tem 
guerra com este o sofy mouro perseano que qa se chama o xeques- 
maell como se despois dira na descricam durmuz E vay perdemdo 
pte dela mas como os f°s nom ham de soceder nom trabalham polla 
liberdade de sua patria/. 

Da obidiem^ia Deste he Judea osiria alguua parte cuja cidade pirn- 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


331 


cipal he damasquo caldea he tambem deste palestina aydumea / De 
todas estas partes nom he mujto obedecido amoor Remda que tinha. 
de que se mamtinha era a Romagem do samto sepulcro & a pasagem 
Da especiaria polio cairo ja aguora da pasage da especiaria tem mt° 
pouco E prazera a noso s 5 r que do samcto sepullcro tera menos As 
out a s Regiooes aleuamtanse cada dia com o xequesmaell que com elle 
comfinam /. 

A $idade de Juda he em huu Rijo mea leguoa do mar he cidade pdadede 
qasy tamanha como adem nom tarn forte, nom de taees muros dizem Judaa. 
ser cousa fraca/ tera 9imqo mjll vezinhos he do soldam do Cairo | Fol. i2or. 
cadano tem capitaoo espauo do soldam com Remda nom tem nehuu 
mamtimemto nem fruitos de seu naturall somemte tamaras mujtas 
carnes pescados triguo aRoz cevadas mjlho lhe vem de zeila & bar- 
bora & das ylhas de 9uaquem tem mujtos mercadores he cidade de 
gramde trato m a leguoa dela ancoram as naaos & aquela m a leguoa 
athee a cidade he de baixamar de huua bra9a & com maree chea de 
tres tem gemte de guarnjcam gemte de cauallo tem o porto auga em 
avomdam9a. toda a mercadaria da Jmdia vai descarregar a Judaa. 
sera dadem viagem de dez dias/. 

De Juda camjnhamdo huu dia pola terra firme he a casa de meq a A casa de 
omde na9eo mafamede & ssua geeracam he a casa de meq a gramde meq ' 
bem fabricada tera mjll vezinhos mercadores mujtos chamase o 
capitao della xecbarq a te he do soldam do cairo esta terra nom tem 
augua vem dacarreto de huu lugar a que chamam arefet huua leguoa 
de meca os mamtimetos vem de Judaa//. 

Almidina he quoatr 0 leguoas damdadura de meca camjnho do almjdina. 
cairo alguu tanto desujado no deserto darabija deserta. sera luguar de 
9em vizinhos e huua tor re q esta neste lugar Jaz mafamede E sua 
filha jemrro & companheiros he de gramde Romagem tem boas 
tamaras E pouq a aug a do cairo ha medina quoremta dias de medina 


a meq a quoatro de meca a Judaa huu de Juda adem dez com vemto/. 

Do cairo a suez vem em tres dias suez he o cabo do estreito nom he homde se 

porto nem cousa pouoada alii dizem que se faz huua armada para qua ^ az a , , 
r r j t. r -i armada do 

he este camjnho despouoado destes tres dias nom tem fortalez a nem soldam. 


pouoacam somemte o mar que he de pedras & baixos a madeira de 



332 


TOME PIRES 


xstaaos 

da 

fimtura. 


Fol. I20v 

trato 
destes na 
Jmdia 


merca- 
dorias que 
trazem a 
Jmdija. 


Arabia 

Felix. 


que se ham de fornecer hede vijr ao menos de fora de seus Regnos 
porq em toda sua terra nem darredor do estreito nom ha senom 
Junqos marjnhos que tem fremosos abrolhos 

A Jemte desta proujn^ia he guerreira tem m tos cavallos acober- 
tados tem artelharias sam destros a cavallo de lamfas em punho & o 
freio na huua maao & trazem esporas asij o sam os dos arabios tem 
Camellos de duas corcouas & desta Jemte mujto asoldada & q peleja 
por que a outra dela viue por seus ofi?ios & deles amdam a furtar a 
terra he de pouca Just^a por causa da Jemte da gerra por que huu 
nom se tempera com ho outro/ 

Ha nesta proujmcia & asy nos arabios mujtos xstaos deles circu- 
cidados & deles naao os circuncidados chamamse Jacobitos os out°s 
malaqujtos tem Duas cooresmas huua em natall. & out a a nosa nom 
casam hos huus com os out°s & mujtos deles sam Jrmjtaees & de samta 
vida. & deles homees de fazemdas & sam muytos ha destes em 
Juda no toro e em meca sam amtre estas gemtes avidos por boos 
homees// 

As mercadarias questes trazem as Jmdias sam de Jtalia veneza vem 
aleixamdria he dos estamcos daly polio Rijo vem aos feitores que 
estam no cairo & Do cairo vem em cafilas com mujta gemte darmas 
vem ao toro mas nem he ysto mujtas vezes por causa dos salteadores 
alarues & ham mester mujta gemte darmas pa guardar a mercadoria 
mas no tempo do Jubileu que he cadano e mequa o primeiro Dia de 
feuereiro E vem mujta gemte com estes mamdam a meq a & Dhy vem 
a Judaa E de Juda vem aos estamcos que tem em adem & dadem se 
espalha por cambay a por guoa polio malabar & bemgala peguu syaoo//. 

trazem panos de laa de cores & sortes chapeoos xstalino de todas 
cores & sortes azernefe vrmelhaao azougue cobre ayo armas prata 
ouro amoedado amfiam almecegua toda sorte de comtas de vidro 
estoraque liqujdo aguoa Rosada chamalotes de mujtas corees & sortes 
fynos & doutros mujtas alcatifas E tapetes de boos lauores he fynos 
& de pre^o/ gramdes & pequenos mujtos vidros despelhos// 

Arabia Felix se estemde Amte o maar Roxo E abixia alguus dizem 
que chegua ha magadaxoo E corre athee tamto como as Jlhas de 
dalaq a E dizem que he toda aquella terra De gemte bramca. omde 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


333 


nom ha cabello Reuolto q he desta arabia. out°s querem que nom 
seja senom athee o cabo de guardafuy chamase felix porque nom he 
tam esterlij como as duas se athee magadaxo se estemde. sabidos sam 
os portos dela se do cabo athee delaca. emtam tem Amte daboquar 
o estreito zeila & barbora & despois dabocado tem dalaqua & lagarj 
deste lagarij que he porto nom mujto pouoado em tres dias vam ao 
njllo e em dez embarquas ao cairo ysto poucas vezes pque os alarues 
nesta pasagem salteam & Roubam os camjnhamtes//. 

he a Jemte desta arabia limp a caualeirosa tem fortelezas he Jemte 
de cavallo tem guerra com abixia que he Junto a esta arabia. & fazem 
cavalgadas e que tomam gramde cantidade dabixijs. & vemdennos 
aos asyanos. tem esta terra triguo & aguoa boa. De mujtas ptes vem 
tratar a estes portos De cambaia De toda arabia pmcipall.m te da 
cidade dadem leuam panos baixos De mujtas sortes matamugos 
comtas out a s de cambay a Dadem leuam pasas dormuz tamaras 
Retomam ouro marfim espauos & fazem seu trato nos ditos portos 
de zeila & barbora. Doutras ptes trata De qujlloa. melimde de braua 
de magadaxoo De mombaga trazem p Retorno boos cavallos que ha 
nesta arabia. nom tem gidades nem Rey viuem em cabilas he gemte 
de Rapina & mujto saluagem por estes dous portos Resfolegua toda 
abixia porque ao cairo vay pouca cousa 

ARabia petrea a deujde da persy a o estreito dormuz & do Rijo q Arabia 
vay a meq a se deujde darabia deserta polio porto de Judaa pola bamda P etrea - 
da terra firm e medija Regiom populosa. E parte da palestina cha- 
mouse esta arabia petrea porque he escaluada. esterilij de serranjas 
De pedra toda tem pouq a Aguoa. tem esta provimgia nas beiras do 
maar alguuas cidades tem Judaa adem fartaque a maseira do cabo de 
Roscallhate pa demtro tem calahate mascate curiate: & out°s lugares 
pola bamda do mar do estreito De hormuz pasamdo a serra demtro na 
terra firme. tem boas gidades bem povoadas fermosa terra de mujta 
gemte. de todas estas cidades & lugares | adem he a mais nobre E Fol. i2ir. 
cousa muyto forte chamamse as gidades da terra firme zebit taees 
beitall faquj camaram cana ginam / / 

A gemte desta arabia he guerreira pelejam acauallo a nosa gujsa 
com esporas as Redeas em huua maao & a lamga na outra. E tem 



334 


TOM ^ PIRES 


com quem 
tracta. 


gramde numero de homees samos cavallos desta arabia melhores que 
todos os out°s De todas estas partes tern grade numero De camellos 
bois de que se serue dout a s alymarjas sam momteiros homes dados 
mujt 0 ao trabalho oufanos presuncuosos esta proujmcia tem Rey a 
que todos obede^em Dizem que vasallo do soldam. este esta sempre 
na terra fyrme porque comtinoada memte tem guerra em sua terra, 
por que som alarues muj tos E a terra he fraguosa. E nom querem 
estar em paz nem tem Remedeo senom furtar //. 

E porque desta Arabia somemte adem he a popullosa. E a chaue 
nem somemte Darabija mas de todo ho estreito asy pa os que emtram 
como Dos que saem Dela. Direy por.que ho all. tudo he enexo ou 
adem ou a hormuz E alguus viuem sobre sy Judaa E mequa sam da 
obidiemcia do soldam E dhy pa demtro/ nos portos do maar he adem 
a chaue nom falamdo da seranja pa a terra fyrme//. 

Adem estaa ao pee de huua serra ella easy em chaao cidade pequen a 
pero fortisyma asij de muros tores baluartes como de toda fabrica de 
casas de bombardeiras seteiras De mujtas artelharias & de mujt a 
gemte de peleja que comtinoada memte tem dela da terra dela 
asoldada afora que a quail qr Repique acode Jmfinjdade da da terra, 
tem demtro na cidade fermosa. fortalez a tem capitam que nella estaa 
asy atabiado como compre porque de dez annos a este cabo sempre 
esta Receosa de nosas armadas & os mouros todos ajudam esta cidade 
que se nom tome temem como for tomada que cedo sera sua fym por 
que Ja agora lhe nom fiqua outra cousa. e esta ja ouue fremoso com- 
bate e emtrada se lhe acomtecera o desastre de quebrarem as escadas 
com o peso da gemte q sobia aos muros E foy famosa cousa seu combate 
por que as taees cidades ham mister primeiro o camp 0 tornado e 
esta esteue em comdicam de se perder dos mouros o quail feito 
dadem foy omrrado posto q se nom tomase a cidade nom ficou mujto 
alegre & os seus ca^izes semtem sua destrui$am que sera fedo //. 

tem esta cidade gram tracto asy com hos do cairo como com toda a 
Jmdia & os da Jmdia com ella. tem Demtro fermosos mercadores de 
gramdes fazemdas & mujtos estamtes dout°s Reinos cidade he em- 
comtradi^a de mercadores esta he das quoatr 0 do mundo que tem 
gramde trato trata demtro no estreito com Juda homde emtregua as 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


335 


sumas das especiarias & drogarias & Recebe as sobreditas trata com 
dalaq a com panos Recebe aljofar trata com Zeilla & barbora com 
panos baixos E em njnharias & Recebe ouro cavallos espauos 
marfim / trata com cocotora. leua panos palha de meca aloes caeotrino 
& samgue de dragao trata com ormuz traz cavallos & das mercadorias 
do cairo Retorna ouro mamtim tos triguo & arroz se o acha. especiaria 
aljofar almjzquer seda E quail qr outra drogaria. trata com cambaia 
traz das mercadorias do cairo & amfiam Retorna gramdes copias De 
panos com q trata nas arabias & Jlhas & sememtes matamimgos 
comtas de cambaia muj tas alaq e q as De todas cores & o primcipall. 
as espiciarias & drogarias de malaq a crauo ma^as noz samdallo 
cubebas aljofar & cousas semelhamtes &c | Fol. i2iv 

traz a cambaia gram suma de Rujva & pasas E tambem a ormuz 

%il ULU 

trata com ho Reino De guoa traz todas mercadorias cauallos E das 
suas & do cairo he Retorna aRoz ferro a?ucar beatilhas ouro em 
camtidade trata com a Jmdia do malabar homde tinha o primcipall 
asemto em calecut caregaua de pimemta gingiure & das cousas de 
malaca com bemgala. Retornaua mujtas sortes de panos bramcos & 
das mercaDarias de malaq a com peguu Retornaua lacar beijoy 
almjzqr & pedraria aRoz tambem De bemgala aroz De siam E as 
mercadorias De china que vem polla bada De odia Desta maneira se 
fez gramde prospera Riqua & soo dadem Recebe o Rey todas suas 
Remdas por que o all nom he nada nom he duuyda soo a Rujva 
Remder ao Rey cem mjll ez dos /. 

As mercadarias propias dadem sam cauallos Rujva aguoa Rosada as mer- 

Rosas secas pasas duvas amfiam & com os do cairo faz copias de todas c f d f rias 
r r dadem 

estas partes ssussoditas vem a seu porto e elles vam a todos cousa he pa 
veer famosa rriqua estimada posto que tenha aguoa pa beber de 
carreto Recolhe todalas mercadarias & as que sam pa seu trato 
necesarias E para se gastarem na terra guardamse/ os mercadores 
estamtes Recolhem as espiciarias a maao E mamdam ao cairo desta 
maneira/ ptem dadem a camaram de camaram a dalaca. De dalaca as 
Jlhas de fuaquem domde podem hir pa todo o estreito deste guaquem 
vam a huu porto que chamam lo?arj da bamda darabia felix e em tres 
dias ao njllo he em dez ao cairo nom cometem este camjnho por causa 



TOME PIRES 


Suez toro 
Juda 


336 

dos ladroees comtinoado despois de serem na Jlha de cuaquem vam 
a Juda naveguamdo de dia E mujtos se perdem por q ho estreito he 
vemtoso de toruoadas por causa das terras E os que vam a Juda 
descaregam despois de serem em Judaa no tempo do Jubileu vem a 
meq a gramdes cafilas E naquele tropell vam em companhia. satis- 
fazemdo os pincipaes da jente. athe o cairo Camjnho de setemta dias 
alguua vez a leuam de Juda ao toro por maar mas poucas vezes porque 
toro nom he o camjnho Reall para o cairo he sam Roubados sempe/ 
o Rey dadem esta sempre na cidade de £anaa que he na terra firme 
homde tem sete ou oito cidades gramdes E de mujta gemte & a mais 
da mourama deles sam Rafadis segujdores da lee E o Rey nom ousa 
ja de os matar com medo do xeqesmaell Rey dos persas segidor dale 
nesta terra de cana ha. mujta aguoa Rosada E Rosas secas que valem 
nabixia & ha nesta cidade as mais fijnas alaquequas que as de 
cambaia. E nom som em tanta Camtidade//. 

os que dadem querem pasar ao cairo viandantes vam a Judaa & de 
Juda ao toro he do toro a suez he em tres dias ao cairo e em cimq°mais 
verdadeira memte. a bem amdar a cauallo que he deserto// 

Do toro nem de suez nom he pa falar por que nom som portos nem 
pouoafoes suez he nomeado de tres ou qoatro annos a esta parte 
porque dizem que he lugar. homde se faz armada nom tem casa nem 
daly a vimte leguoas he cousa herma desabrigada terra escaluada sem 
erua de suez vimdo ao toro nom podem senom de dia he em cousas 
sotis tem mujta pedra E tudo baixo/ o toro nom he de vijmte casas 
a?ima estas sam de xstaos dos que acima disse as pouoacoes sam 
mujto metidas na terra dalarues ladroees vimdo do toro a Juda he 
camjnho easy como ho outro desauemturado toda aquella terra he 
maldita sem dela ser aproveitada nenhuua cousa. Judaa he porto de 
meq a cousa pequena de baixos em todo o estreito nom tem outra 
cousa senom Judaa. he em terra escaluada agora dizem que sse faz 
forte com medo tem gemte de garnjeam de Juda pa adem he camjnho 
priguoso mas nom tamto/. 

Despois dadem he fartaque as Jlhas de curia muria E amaseira tudo 
ysto sam alarues gemte de trato E boa gemte de peleja. de fartaque 
vam mt os por fromteiros a cacotora E a zeila. E barbora estes viuem 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


337 


tambem de trato mas he cousa pouca. do cabo de Roshallhate pa 
demtro he do s ri0 do Reino dormuz sam os Fartaqujs de fremosas 
espadas E de todo out 0 genero darmas sam homees ousados/ //. 

esta terra darabia deserta polio estreito de meq a comeca de Judaa. Pol. i22r. 
athee o toro & vay ao maar mediteranjo E deujde a terra de egipto ara i,i a 
de Judea, alguns afirmam que meca he nesta terra he nom na petrea. deserta’ I. 
desta nam ha que dizer tem alarues ladroees nom tern aruores nem 
fruitos nem augoa geerall memte saluo em lugares dos alarues 
sabidos sam ladroees na tem out a vida. gemte mal^iosa fora de 
rrezam em cabilas amdam salteamdo omde ho acham/ 

por hordem se nos Represemta a polida Jlha dormuz com todo seu hormuz 
Regno & com a copya das Jlhas em seu estreito o quail Reino alem 
de ser Riq° E nobre he a chaue das persas Comfina com arabija 
petrea da bamda [blank] em que tem de seu senhorio cidades 
E da bamda de cambaia. com hos naitaques & da terra fijrme 
com ha gramde provim^a persy sam debaixo do Reino dormuz as 
ylhas de baharem he todas as do estreito dormuz E o Rey mouro de 
carapu9a vermelha segidor da seita dale nouamemte feito a gemte 
Durmuz he de peleja de boas armas De cavallos sam polidos homees 
domesticos estemdese este Reyno do cabo de Roscallhate pa demtro 
polo estreito tem gemte mujta de casas bem obradas// 

A cidade Durmuz esta em huua Jlha casij pegada aterra persija 
obra de huua leguoa he de muros casas 90teas torres baluartes em sij 
muy fresca e esta huua das quoatro desta bamda dasija em toda 
gemtileza De fremosas molheres aluas em trato nom da a vamtagem 
a sseus vizinhos se nas cousas Do comer se praticar nom lhe chegam 
hos framemguos nem fram9eses de frujtos e abomdam9a. como os 
nosos tem em sy a cidade gemtes de mujtas partidas grosos merca- 
dores somemte care9e Dauga esta Jlha / tem a cidade mujtas 9istemas 
& P090S mas aguora da que comtinoadamemte bebem vem da terra 
firme e almadias emjarrada & vail as vezes cara segumdo ho temp 0 
porem se a da terra firme nom acudise tem aguoa nom mt° boa nem 
pa tamto pouoo tem Jlhas & Jumto comsyguo que tambem tem 
fermosas aguoas/ por Rezam do porto se fumdou esta cidade// 
comtinoadamemte tem naaos de fora que a ella vem com merca- 

H H.C.S. 11. 



TOM li PIRES 


338 

dorias e ela trata com todos do quail o Rey durmuz he gramdememte 
Rico dos dereitos durmuz he antig 0 hormuz asy em armas como em 
trato nestas partes he avido em estima he cousa muy necesaria seu 
trato nestas partes / he a cidade muj populosa honrrada Riqua. 
estreito Amtre arabia petrea he terra de persija vay huu estreito de maar 
durmuz pouoado de cada bamda em que ha fermosas pouoagoees que se 

chama o estreito durmuz nom he todo nauegauell & pola moor parte 
quern esta no meio vee a terra de huua das partes e em cabo Danbas 
he mais demtro nauegauell/ Durmuz navegamdo qoatro dias cimq 0 
de vemto ha mujtas Jlhas as primcipaees se chamam de baharem 
omde se pesca o melhor aljofar destas partes & he gramde mercadoria 
e ormuz e em camtidade Jeerall memte he mais alluo E Redomdo que 
doutra parte/. 

trato trata hormuz com adem cambaia E com ho Reino de daque E guoa 

durmuz he com os ptos do Reino de narsymgua. E no malabar a primcipall 
mercadaria que traz sam cavallos arabios e parses aljofar salitre 
emxofre seda tutia pedra vme que se chama alexamdrina em nosas 
partes caparrosa aziche sail em camtidade seda braq a mujtas tamgas 
sam moedas de prata de valia de sesemta & cimq 0 Rs ap & almjzqr as 
vezes ambra E mujta fruita seq a triguo cevada & cousas a estas seme- 
lhants de comer'/ 

Retomam pimemta crauo canella gemgiure todo outro genero 
despeciarias he drogarias que se gastam gramdememte na terra da 
persya & arabia he tambem alguua vay adem quamdo he mujta. 
porque Ja dormuz sae cara nom creio q daly pase ao cairo pa vir a 
Jtalia. Retornam Jso mesmo aRoz qmt° podem beatilhas panos 
bramcos ferro fynallmemte que todo seu Jntemto de seu Retorno he 
p ta aRoz & ouro tern os cavallos no Reino de guoa & de daquem & 
Fol. i22v. narsingua grade | vallia polio quaall cadano hormuz acode a estes 
Reinos com elles/ haa cavallo q vail setecemtos serafijs moedas de 
iij e xx te res cada huua como sam boos os melhores sam arabios 
segumdos perseanos ter^eiros terceiros De cambaia estes valem pouq 0 
como Despois se dira .//. 

Persija porque hormuz he vizinho a persija e ela ser terra firme de que leua 
pmcipio noso Recomtamemto nom me pareceo onesto hear por falar 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 339 

Della. E se larguo falar Da persya ela ho merece ao menos por ser a 
mafamede contralra/ 

A gramde prouim^ia Da persija nom tem mais no maar ociano que 
ho Reino durmuz De sua comfromtacam da bamda de cambay a a 
parte os naitaques da banda Darabia ho estreito durmuz pola terra 
firme polas serranjas de delij he por armenja easy por babilonja. E por 
cima de medea he vem dar na ydamca he deuydida. esta proujmeia 
em mais de qoremta Reinos E Regiooes desta terra dela habitada & 
muj boa E dela he momtuosa & desabitada/ chamasse esta provimeia 
asy toda Jumta na lingoagem delies /agenb/ E nos dizemos persya na 
linguoagem de q a todos os dagenb/ dizem parses a que nos chamamos 
persas ou persyanos / 

As melhores proujmeias ou Regnos desta persija sam quoatro .s. p r0 uim- 

cora9onj/ gujlanj taurjnj/ xita9y / E nestas quoatro proujmeias ha fias do. 

persija 

iiij 0 cidades mujto prim9ipaees .s. /tauris/ xiras/ 9amarcante'/ & ( id a( j es 
coracane na Regiam de coraconj/ sam os que chamam Rumes E nos 
de gujlam sam deles turqimaees homees guerreiros & de peleja 
gemtes amtrestas ptes estimados e estes dizem q trazem ho nacimemto 
De xpaaos/ os De tauris & xiras sam como em franca paris sam 
domesticos gemtijs homees cortesaos E sobre tudo se louuam as 
molheres De xiras De fermosas aluas Descretas atabiadas domde os 
mouros dizem que mafamede nunq a qujs hir a proujmeia de xiras 
porque gostamdo dela numq a fora ao paraiso despois de morto 
ajumtase tambem a estas qat° a proujmeia de media que q a chamam 
/mjdonj/ que tem tambem huua prin9ypall cidade que se chama 
/ssusan/ que tambem he enexa a persya'/ aguora desta cidade em 
ester / se comtem crara memte sobre asuero & sua molher ‘/vasti - / 
todas estas proujmeias asenhorea o xequesmaell. que la nas Regioees 
detras do vemto chamam Jguoalador*/ ou 9ofij/ E porque se tratou 
na descricam Dormuz que o Rey tem a carapu9a vermelha que he o 
sinall deste xeque bem he que delle se diga domde teue primeipio 
ele & sua ley / E toda a bamda Da europa se chama qua gemtes detras 
do vemto / sam os persyanos homees de cauallo armados De todas 
armas de fremosas garnj9oes Despadas bem obradas sam homees De 
nosa coor corpo & fei9am sem duujda os Das carapu9as sam homes 



340 


T0M12 PIRES 


Fol. 1237. 


Naci- 
memto da 
seita do 
sofij 


que mais parecem portugueses q dout a s partidas as carapu^as sam 
altas de doze verduguos no de cijma estreitas athee o emcaixameto 
na cabeca & darredor touq as o xequesmaell esta a m5or parte Do 
tempo em taurjs que he durmuz cinq°enta dias damdura e camellos 
a trra Da persya tem todo ho genero dalimarias mansas das que ha 
em nosa terra Ea terra de persija tem mujtas om?as lioes tigrers// 
Sam os persas mujto dados a toda deleita5am em seus vestidos 
muj t0 comcertados De mujtos porfumes vmtamse daloes dimgoemtos 
cheirosos de valor tem mujtas molheres Seruemse de capados & vem 
a ser gramdes Sres os capados que tem carguo das molheres sam 
homees ciossos todollos mouros gerall memte E asij geerall memte 
os mouros sam putos homde meto os persyanos E os Dormuz com 
toda sua gimtileza E nom ho am por alheo de sua comdi^am nem sam 
poriso castigados he ajmda ha lugares pubricos homde se exergitam 
por dr° E os que deste neg09eo padecem no auto sam desbarbados 
vestidos a gujsa De molheres E asij amdam E Rijnsse os mouros De 
nos quando lhe acrimjnamos a torpeza deste pecado/ 

esta terra da persija he a mais amtig a E mais nob re de toda a asia 
houue nela sempre monarchas gramdes Sres esta sojuzguou sempre 
mujtas proujmgias notorias sam os q obtiuerom este Jmperio de 
nabuca de nosor E seu filho firo/ E dario asuero E os xersses E 
outs 0 nesta tera ouue o gramde alexamdre seus estendidos vimfi- 
memtos/ nom he asij ester le E momtuosa como alguus estoriadores 
comtam mas avomdosa de todos deleites dhomees domesticos em 
toda cortosija he vistido E no feito das armas magnanjmos E 
esfforcados de fremosos cavallos sam momteiros cagadores de todas 
aves E a terra de xiras he o amaguo da persija tera avomdosa de 
triguo vinho cames fruitos E nom care^e de nozes castanhas figuos 
pasados como nosa terra propija'//. 

Em o tempo de mafamede mouro arabio teue por Jemrro ale que 
era seu sobrinho he casado com sua ffilha fatema avia na companhia 
de mafamede quoatro companheiros ahuu deziam /otuman/ E outro 
/bulbucar/ E outro / hamar/ E out 0 hacabar estes forom ajudadores 
do alcoram'/. depois de morto o mafamede emlegero por capitam a 
bulbucar por mais velho o ale nom sofreo de boa vomtade a tal 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 341 

emlei9a mostraua pertemcerlhe a sij por sobrinho como por jemrro 
ficou de fora ha obidiemcia do bulbucar E este morto E otuman foy 
primcipall E asij todos E despois ho alee estes todos quoatro forom 
xpaaos segumdo dizem E todos estam emterrados em almedina 
luguar em arabia distamte de meca por tres Jornadas em desertos //. 

destes quoatro que forom despois de mafamede sairom quoatro 
maneiras de mouros huus se cham a xafij .malaq. anafij. hambarj. cada 
hum discripaua da propia temcam de mafamede como morreo E queria 
tambem atrebujr a sij esprito de profecia falsa, como ho mafamede 
dode oje em dia ha nesta parte, athee o pressente estas quatro maneiras 
de mouros distantes em cousas dos huus aos out°s no modo do creer’/ 

ho ale quamdo lhe veio a vez do gouernar Congou tambem a 
fazerse profeta he maior que os pasados E fez huu liuro em que 
dizija maall de seu sogro E dos companheiros afirmamdo asy melhor 
espirito de profecia que aos out°s E apomtamdo cousas que desfazia 
nelles he mamdou que dhij por diamte em sua oracam nomeasem ale 
E nam mafamede diz d0 que por sua lamca ganhara mujta terra E que 
os doze Signos do ?eeo eram com elle he Jumtos em seu nacimemto 
o fezeram Cavaleiro E gramde profeta E que nom qeria q nenhuu 
mouro creese o que seu sogro disera que metera o soli na mamga. E 
cousas que desfazem autoridade de mafamede que os mouros sabem/ 
domde sairom loguo hos segujdores dalee que se chamam zeidis /E 
Rafadis sam mouros que gardam a opynjam Dale E dos Rafadijs he o 
xequesmaell/. 

despois de morto ho ale por ser forte em sua guouernam^a alguus 
dos seus se mudarom ao pare5er de mafamede E out°s teuerom o 
dalle, vierom a crecer tamto os de mafamede que pronunciarom leis 
que todo o que fose segujdor dale morresse dizemdo que nom fora 
profeta nem samto mas que fora bom cavaleiro em seu tempo domde 
se Recre9eo Daquelle tempo athee aguora mujtos mouros segidores 
Dale morresem por Justica nas terras dos mouros por Jreges de 
maneira que os segujdores dale os ouuerom por fora da ley E nam 
vam a mequa E porem com quamto eram ponjdos por ale antre os 
mouros sempre ouue mujta gemte destes secreta athee o tempo 
Deste xeqesmaell 



342 


TOME PIRES 


Nad- ho xequesmaell he naturall persiano da Regiao de xiras fidalguo de 

™Hsmaell na ? am desse gramde xeas homes que desprezam ho mundo he viuem 

ou fofij/. solitaria memte porque mamtem pobreza foy o pay deste xeq e homem 
amtre os mouros avido por home de boa vida E que decemdia da 
casta dale he teue tres filhos o xequesmaell he o do meio/ he todos 
sam viuos soia o pay do x e esmaell falar mujtas vezes com elRey de 
xiras he eram amigos falauam mujtas vezes praticamdo de maneira 
que o Rey de xiras se escamdalizou do x e E o matou alguus dizem que 
ho x e amoestou a elRej de xiras que se emformase das cousas dale E 
que sseguise seu parecer out°s Dizem que ouuerom Desputa E que o 
Rey De xiras fauorecia mafamede & o xeque fauorecia alee de man a 
que o x e foy alij morto & o xeque morto/ Dizem que tinha estes fs° 
de huua molher xstaa. armenja molher De boos paremtes E que ha 
tijnha comuertida a opinjam Dale E despois De morto o pay do x e 
ismaell esteue o x e ismaell com sua may & com huu seu tijo xtaoo 
armenjo cinquo annos//. 

Fol. 1 23V. morto ho pay nom he duujda o filho estar em casa de sua may da 
ydade de dez annos de q era quamdo matarom ho pay eesteue athee 
xb como o mo?o foy de xb segujo ha companhia dos xpaaos sseus 
paremtes com os quaes esteue seis annos os xstaos lhe dauam de 
comer E o emssinavam tomou Delles o que lhe bem pare$eo he semp 
lhe foy obidiemte de maneira que foy o moco crecemdo em uomdade 
E discri?am que com comselho dos paremtes xstaos mandou huua 
carta a ellRey De xiras que lhe dese de comer pois lhe matara seu pay 
foy Respomdido com huu cajado he huuas comtas por modo de 
zombaria que aquillo lhe pertemfia. pois era xeq e home pobre/ ho 
mo?o Jmdinado com hos paremtes Jmsijnado em nosa fee foise a hum 
Rey Jumto com xiras que ho ajudase comtra elle pois o Rey era seu 
Jmiguo & q lhe emprestase alguu dr° E com outro que lhe daua seus 
paremtes queria matar ellRey de xiras foy ajudado E por sua Jndus- 
tria ajumtou dous mjll homes E fazija saltos pola terra. Despois 
Roubau a Detremjnou comtra vomtade dos que trazija comsyguo huua 
sesta feira emtrar De dia na $idade/ emtrou he dizem que matou 
sessemta mjll homees E ouue a cidade a maao & a Roubou E que sse 
pos em trimta mjll De peleja com os qees fez a guerra sete annos ou 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


343 


oyto que tem toda a proujmsia. Da persija com todollos Regnos p sy //. 
os Dous mjll omes que ajuntou o xequesmaell iij e eram De cavallo 
Dos quaees Duzemtos eram xstaos armenjos paremtes da may Do 
xeque os cento eram paremtes Do pay a gemte De pee era destes/ o 
dr° que tinha era pa mamtim t0 E nom teue mais gemte no primcipio 
De seu cometimento E agora no tem numero sua gemte/ quamdo 
emtrou na cidade De xiras tinha oitemta mjll combatemtes leuaua 
seis mjll De cavallo//. 

todas as cousas que faz he p comselho destes xstaoos segumdo 
dizem nom derriba casa de xstaos nem mata nehuu xstao Dizem que 
trara comsiguo Dez mjll homes xpaaos armenjos & dout a s na^Sees 
com os quaes comete as cousas gramdes he todollos Rex se lhes dam 
& obedecem/ as Jgreias nosas Reforma. Destruj toDa casa De 
mouros que seguem a mafamede a nenhuu Judeu nom daa vida. 
honde ho acha tem guerra com ho soldam E com gemtes De turqia 
vaise fazemdo gramde aos Reis mamda a carapu?a vermelha. se a 
tomam sam amiguos senam ficam capitaes Jmiguos //. 
este x e que sera homem de xxx ta athee xxxij annds esta dasemto a 
mo5r parte em tauris he pequeno De corpo de fortes membros traz a 
carapuca elle mesmo amtigam te os mouros segujdores desta seita 
nom traziam carapu^as este as mamda trazr alguus Dizem que secre- 
tamemte se emtemdem os doze debruus polios xij apllos mas o mais 
?erto que ele pubrica mujtas vezes que louua ale por profeta mayor q 
todos E que hos synos do ceeo ho serujam que poriso traz doze 
debruus he que haDe ser vermelha em synall que o que a nom quiser 
tomar Do propio samgue seu se lhe ha de fazer sua carapuca vermelha. 
dizem que he ome gracioso liberall he todo mouro De mafamede se 
sabe que bebe vinho mamda matar E aos Das carapugas lhe da li- 
cemca e tamto q em toda a persya Janom ha home q nom seja De sua 
seita. hos omrrados trazem carapucas os pobres se nom tem por 
homde nom ha trazem porem todos seguem alee/ dizem que he 
caualeiro de Sua pesoa. tem ja fs° tem mujtas molheres / nas terras 
dos mouros .s. na Do soldam & do Rey Dadem se aleuamtam muytos 
nesta seita. E nom hos ousam a matar E cada dia se tomam pa a 
bamda dale muj tos dos de mafamede tem Ja mujta gemte Dos 



TOME PIRES 


344 

mouros da siria. coumertidos a seita dale he alevamtamse capitaees 
seus caDa Dia na opinjom Dalle polio qual os mouros ho tem a maao 
synall/ ho xeq e he mouro ?ircun<;idado segujdor dale posto q mujtos 
mouros Dizem que he xstao este mamda aos Rex mouros letrados 
seus Desputar a seita dale comt a a opinjam de mafamede. & os em- 
baixadores que este xeq e mamda. vem antorizados De mujtos de 
cauallo bem vestidos homees De feicam Dazemalas baixelas De pata 
E douro nos qees se vee a gramdeza do xeque a todolos Rex mouros 
mamda Dadivas presemtes letrados pa que syguam sua ley Diz que 
nom hade Repousar athee e seu tepo nom fazer todollos mouros da 
bamda dale E despois sera o que ele sabe Deve ser esta a mourama 
com este novo x e E mujto mais agastada com o poder De uosa alteza/. 

Fol. i24r, ha nesta terra De persya gram suma De mercadores E a terra he em 
sy de gramde trato porque tem trato Desdo cauo coremdo a terra 
athee os armenjos em que se comtem mujtas proujmgias muj nobres 
E Riquas/ E da turquja pola siria vem gramde trato a persija/ tem a 
terra De xiria & out a s/ mujta seda de que se fazem Ricos pannos E 
mujtas sortes De chamalotes de cores fijnos he muj t0 boos / tem tutia 
em gramde camtidade mujta pedra vme caparrosa E alcofoll que os 
mouro vsam/ tem mujtos cavallos mujtos mamtimemtos tem mujtas 
torquesas que na?em em a trra de xiras tem mujta ?era mell. mamteiga 
todas estas sam naturaes da terra/ pola bamda De delj por tras a serra 
pare^e vijr por vya De siam de Reino em Reino almijzqr Rujbarbo 
agujlla ou lenho aloees de botiqua camfora todas estas cousas E out a s 
mais vem todas a hormuz tapetes gramdes alcatifas panos De laa mujtos 
de mujtas cores chapeos barretes ha sua guisa armarias sem numero 
bem garnjdas/ Retornam gram suma De espiciarias E draguorias 
primcipallmemte pimemta. que se gasta m ta na persija porque sam 
homees De potagees mais q alemaees que he amtreles gramde merca- 
doria que ha espalham por seus comarquaaos compram alljofar aRoz 
panos brancos beatilhas beijoy E cousas a estas semelhamtes 
Esta terra da persia com todas suas RegiSees estam antre dous Rijos 
.s. tigris he eufrates alguus afirmam que estes dous Rios nom vem ter 
ao mar o?eano mas que na persia fazem seus termos E que emtram no 
syno persico em huu maar ou laguo gramde Daguoa salgada nauega- 
uell que ha na persya cercado todo De terra De fremosas abita9oees 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


345 


na proujmcia De gujlam E que navegam barcacas E que sera De 
traueca vimte leguoas em a qual ha tormemtas & mujto pescado que 
salgado se Reparte pola persija homde pode hir & o outro sequo/ out°s 
Dizem ser moor este mar mas eu me eertefiquey por mtos he me dixe- 
rom ser esta a medida. a quail me parece ser gramde ysto he aRedado 
mujto Dormuz por mais De dous meses Damdadura e camellos / 
out°s Dizem que o tigris vem pola syria E vem acabar casij Jumto 
com ho mar Do estreito Durmuz obra De xij leguoas & que vem Ja 
pequeno porque se espalha enbra^os core violemta memte E he 
estreito nom navegauell em lugares se pasa a pee. eem outs 0 em ma- 
deiros E barquas a sua guisa ha seta em parse chamase /tir E pola 
ligeireza do Rijo se chama tigris/ /. 

o eufrates tern o nacimemto na Armenja E dizem que vem sair ao 
maar o?iano E que deujde os naitaques dos Resputes E os de cambaia 
chamam a este Rijo frataa he que vem polio estremo da persia E que 
por homde vem este nom he a terra mujto aproveitada he gramde 
Rijo nom vem tarn ligeiro como o tigris este he demtro navegauell. de 
barcas sotias q nauegam os destas partes por homde corre//. 

Deixada a persia caminhamdo pa a Jmdia polo mar ociano emtramos 
na tra dos naitaques/. 

Sam os naitaques vizinhos de huua bamda com hos persas & da Naitaques 
bamda de cambaia com os Resputes E da terra firme terra momtuosa. 

Da proujmcia de delij & da out a tern o mar ociano sam estes naitaques 
gemtios nom ha amtrelles mouros he mujta gemte he gramde terra 
estemdense pola terra demtro nom tern Rey vivem em cabilas nunca 
nehuu destes Recebeo o nome De mafamede tem lingoagem sobresy 
nom tem ?idades tem pouoacoes em serras nomtes eeste Rijo os faz 
mujto fortes porque alagua a terra chaa / he a terra em sij de mujtos 
mamtim tos triguo cevada fruitos estes a mor parte Delles sam cosairos 
trazem barcas sotis sam frecheiros athee Duzemtos saem ao mar E 
Roubam qmdo acham tempo E alguuas vezes chegam athee ormuz 
eemtra Dentro no estreito a fazer salto & disto viuem / os taees trazem 
arcos espadas lan9as E nam som homes mujto Domesticos mujtas 
vezes com tempo vam ancorar ha foz deste Rijo he he emseada com 
Restimguas E pedra os naitaques apanham qllqr nao q alij vem algu- 
uas vezes & as mais vaao ao Reino De cambay a a seus portos E se 



TOME PIRES 


346 

acham furtam por homde podem nom teme nigue ne tem acolheitas 
de rrios e suas terras & sam mujtos nestas ptes/ sam conhecidos por 
homees desta man a / 

Fol. 1 24V. os que na terra estam semeamdo E lauramdo tem muj tos cavallos 

E mujtas eguoas em que amdam como alarues tembem furtamdo por 
homde acham tem estes paz E amizade com os Resputes E cousa de 
mouros nom lhe perdoa E de quail quer outra gemte/ tem mujta 
afynjdade hos naitaqes he Resputes he viuemdo antre mouros cerca- 
dos De suas terras tamtos tempos nunq a hos poderom sojugar. sam 
valemtes homees salteadores/ a terra dos naitaques he mor E mais 
gemte que os Resputes peroo os Resputes he gemte melhor como se 
dira adiamte e seu lugar/ / 

Resputes I hos Resputes da bamda da persija sae os naitaques & da de cambay a 
a mesma cambaya. Da terra firme terra de dely E da outra o mar oceano 
som estes Resputes gemtios sem auer amtreelles mouros nom tem 
Rey tem sor a q obede9em tem a terra Destes fortalezas fortes E lu- 
gares fortes sam valemtes homees Caualeiros tem mujtos cavallos & 
pola moor pte tem eguoas em que pelejam a terra destes he abastada. 
E mujto boa. De mujtos mamtimentos E aproueitada & forte e sy E 
nom he mujta a terra porque lha tem tomada he melhor gemte esta de 
gueerra que seus vizinhos comtinoadamemte tem guerra com ellRey 
De cambaya mujtas vezes lhe fazem Dapno & o poem em desbarato 
porq sam estuciossos sabedores E com pouca gemte nam somemte se 
ssostem mas Ajmda dam comtinoadamemte fadig a Aos cambaesses / 
nom som posamtes pa em campo podere em azees pellejar com cam- 
baia mas seu Emtemto he Rebates cavallgadas fazem presas cati- 
uanse huus aos outros sam estes Resputes homees Destros na guerra 
Robustos gramDes frecheiros //. 

tem estes tanbem saida ao maar em que tem navios De Remo & 
fazem presash por homde acham asij como os naitaques mas seu poder 
todo he na terra. Alguus afirmam que destes Resputes & naitaq es 
eram os que tinham a^eso as amazonas que de huua parte Da terra 
firme comfinam com estes & com cambaia como se dira na Descricam 
De cambaia pola bamda de delij a terra Destes estemdese na terra 
firme por gramdes serranjas Ja esta Regiam teue Rey E pouco ha que 
o matarom he nom se fez Despois outro tem este Reino fermosas 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


347 

cidades De / ara/ crodi/ vamistra/ argengij/ o capitam primcipall De 
todo este Reino chamase pimpall varaa/ E huua Jrmaa deste que se 
chama bibi Rane he casada com ho Rey De cambaya que lha deu o 
pai por partido amtes que morrese & dizem q he fremosa. * 1 

0 Nobre Reino de cambaia comfina de huua bamda Da parte da 
persija com a Regiam dos Resputes E da bamda da Jmdia segunda 
com ho gramde Reino De daquem Da terra firme com ho Reino de 
delij E da bamda do [blank] com ho mar oceano apartase este Reino 
com o de daquem amtre maymj E chaull. he o Reino em sij gramde 
mujto abastado De todo genero Do triguo gevadas mjlho legumes 
fruitos E de mujtos cavallos alifamtes aves De caca. E outs a mujtas em 
gayolas De diuersas fei?oees E prezadas terra mujto abytada De 
fermosas 9idades no maar E na terra firme E De gramdes pouoagoes 
sam cavaleiros tern mujta artelharia. E todo eixer^io De guerra. tern 
mujtos cavallos acubertados armas De suas p as fremosas asy De lamj- 
nas como de malha lamcas Defremososferros compridas espadas adar- 
guas bem guarnjdo tudo he gramde ho pouoo tem mujta J emte Dalmas 
Jemte de guerra De fora tem maijaris aRabios turqujmaes Rumes 
persianos conuem saber gujlanes cora9ones abixijs toda gemte limpa 
com que comtinoadamemte peleja com os Reinos comarcaaos com 
que tem guerra amtrestas na9oes ha mujtos xstaaos aRenegados & 

As primcipaees cidades que tem no mar he 9urrate/ Ranei/ Dio/ 
cambaia tem outs ros portos De pouoacoees .s. maymj/ damana/ patan 
guogua/ diu. he guoga he mamj ou may sam da guouernam9a. De 
melequiaz mouro persianogujlanj dena9am //. Damana/ 9urrate Ranei/ 
sam da Jurdicam de dasturcan mouro naturall de cambai a fidalguo na 
terra patan he da guouernam^a. Do filho do Rey de cambai a que ss e./ 
chama soltan xaquendar a cidade de cambaia he da Jurdi9am de sey 
debiaa p a pmcipall mouro Da terra homem fidalguo De pre90 am- 
treeles/ as cidades primcipaes Da terra firme he champanell/ & meda- 
daue/ varodrra / baruez/ tem estas cidades gramdes vazeris ou capi- 
taees homees com que se gouerna todo ho Regno/ este meliquiaz foy 
homem de pee frecheiro foilhe dada ha gouernamca da bamda de dio 

1 At the foot of this page are the words: ‘aquy acaba o pr° ly.’ (here ends 
the first book). This note, written in the same hand as that on Fol. n8v. 
and then crossed out, is beside a star which appears to correspond to a similar 
star at the end of the text on the next page. 


Fol. 12 5r. 

Regno de 
cambaia 


Ifidades 
no mar E 
na terra.l 



TOME PIRES 


Distam- 
cia das 
cidades do 
maar a 
cham- 
panell 

pimcipaes 

fidades 


Moeda 


Fol. 1 25V. 

Regnos na 

terra 

canarjm 


348 

por ser a menos cousa De cambaia. & easy matos ante do noso Desco- 
brimemto das Jndias E porque os portos de daque andauam sempre 
sopeados se fez dio gramde comnosaamizade aguora he cousa homrada 
homde se guarda mais a Just a que em out a parte do Reino tem e 
sua estrebaria iij e cavallos q mamtem a custa das Remdas da terra & 
De dio a champanell ha amdadura de oito dias De cambaia a 
champanell amdaDura De dous Dias De currate & Renerj a champa- 
nell. Amdadura. De cimquo Dias por terra todo /. 

A melhor cidade do sertaao he champanell nom he gramde he 
pulida & bem obrada'/ E a cidade De mais mercadoria he a cidade De 
cambaya. estaa na emseada he de baixos ao menos huua bra?a/ o mais 
quatro / esta tem melhores mercadorias/ he easy todo o trato Desta 
De gemtios as out a s cidades sam de boos portos E fortelezas nelles/ o 
Reino de cambaya na terra firme he pequeno //. 

A moeda meuda desta terra he de cobre mais grosa que ceitys tem 
moeda de prata que se chama mastamudes vail cada huua tres vijm- 
tees tem tambem outra que se chama madaforxas De prata. Da mesma 
valia ho ouro corre E em barras por sseus toques he valias/' 

Aq j deixares este & buscares cambaia que vay adiamte /* 1 
Aguora sam no vltimo Reino Da primeira Jmdia que se chama a 
proujmeia dos canarijs apartase de huua bamda polio Reino De guoa 
p amgadiua E da out a pola Jmdia meaa / ou Jmdia do malabar pola 
terra firme he ellRey de narsimgua que he cabe£a desta terra a limgu- 
oagem da q he canarim he deferemte da do Reino De daquem E do 
Reino De guoa tem nas beiras Do maar Dous Rex E alguuas peque- 
nas Regioees sam todos gemtios obediemtes a ellRey De narsimgua 
sam homes polidos guereiros eixercitados nas armas asij no maar 
Como na terra Das terras que o Rey de narsimgua tinha nesta pm a 
Jndia nom lhe fiquou somemte esta de que aguora hee o presemte 
Recomtamemto he terra ha proueitada De boas pouoa^oees//- 

1 These words, at the top of the page, are in the same hand as the MS, and 
were obviously added after the transcriber had written the text. The trans- 
lation is: ‘Here you will leave this and look for Cambay which comes later on’. 
On the confused arrangement of the sheets in the MS and the present re- 
arrangement of the text, see Introduction. 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 349 

Na terra dos canarljs comeca p amjediva athe mamgallor mjrgeu Portos 
onor baticala bailor baira vera bacanor vdipiram mamgallor/ todos n ° maar 
estes portos sam De trato / Donor mjrgeu athe amgediua he delRey de 
garipopa. fromteiro De guoa. por el Rey De narsimgua. baticala com 
bafallor. E out a s villas na terra firme tern Rey os out°s quoatro portos 
tern capitaees todos sam obediemtes ao Rey De narsymgua E lhe 
acodem com as Remdas/ 

ho Rey de gar£Opa he pesoa homrrada & de mujt a gemte De cauallo 
athee tres mjl homes segumdo afirmam garcopa esta polio Rijo Donor 
cimqo leguoas demtro he cyDade peq e na fresca he timoja era sua 
abita£am em onor por que tinha afinidade co ellRey de gargopa este 
esta mujtas vezes na corte DellRey De narsimgua he seu vasallo 
obidiemte este Rijo Donor he de muj gramde pouoa5am he De naujos 
aquj fazija timoja sua armada em que amdau a salteamdo Daquj 
athee ho cabo De guardafuy Domde fazija gramdes presas era temido 
este timoja dos navegamtes E era ajudado Do Rey de guar^opaa/ 

EllRey de baticala he Jemtio canarim maior Rey que o donor E baticala 
gar?opaa tern mt a terra ffirme em seu Reino batecala he porto Despois 
De guoa E chaull/ muy homrrado E de gramde neguo£ea£am he 
aguora Domde seo Reino De narsijmga serve & tern os cavallos tern a 
cidade mujtos mercadores asij gemtios como mouros he gramde 
escalla De muj tos mercadores he gramde porto ho Rey esta sempre na 
tra firme tern por guouernador Da na^ao dos Jemtios Damj chatim p a 
primfipall Em fazemda E gramde mercador he tern por gouernador 
Da nacam dos mouros /caizar/ mouro capado que foy criado De 
cojatar. ho Durmuz ha nesta cidade mouros De todas nafoees foy 
cousa mujto gramde amte da tomada de guoa pllo capitam Jeerall Ja 
aguora de demenuyda// 

De todos estes portos dos Regnos Dos canarijs a mais homrrada 
cousa era baticala p Rezam Dos mujtos mercadores que tinha. E 
vinham mujtos cavallos De todas partes aquj Desembarcar E outr a s 
mercadorias mujtas estes cavallos se comprauam pa o Reino De nar- 
simga. de que se pagauam gramdes dereitos Retornavam os merca- 
dores Desta terra Dos canarljs aRoz em mujta cantidade o melhor De 
todas estas partes .s. gyracall que he mais meudo & mais branq 0 E de 



tom£ pires 


Fol. I 26 r 


Narsim- 

gua 


35 ° 

mais pre90 E mais estimado E depos este chamba9all. E depos ho 
chambacall he o pacharill De guoa. & do Reino De daquem Retorna- 
uam asy mesmo ferro E mujto a9ucar. qua ha nesta terra E mujtas 
comseruas dacuqr que se fazem em baticala ysso da terra E dos mer- 
cadores da bamda malabar athee malaca tinham muj tos que hy vinham 
teer. De maneira q era sua neguoceacam gramde esta he a cousa mais 
estimada q ho Rey De narsimgua tem nesta parte Do canarim //. 

qmto aos lugares de baira vera bacanor vdipiram mamgalor todos 
sam lugares portos de mercadores he de naaos que tratam com cam- 
baya he com ho Regno De guoa & de daquem E hormuz leuamdo das 
mercadorias Da terra trazemdo out a s ha nestes portos capitaees 
homrrados com gente De guarnj9am acodem com has Remdas ao Rey 
de narsijmgua tem ho | Rey nesta tera dos canary's asy nos portos do 
maar como na terra firme gramdes Redas E tem estas beiras do mar 
com fortalezas a sua guisa mas a mor fortaleza. sam as barras Dos 
Rijos he tudo terra muyto aproueitada grosa E boa de mujtos manti- 
metos De muyta Jemte. asy de cauallo como de pee tem muyto betelle 
E areca tem a terra dos canarijs templlos De suas ora9oees gramdes E 
omrrados tem mujtos bramenes De mujtas sortes E ordees delies 
castos delles nam como no Regno de guoa custumase queimarem as 
molheres polla maneira q he dito nos out°s gemtios// 

Estas terras proujmcias .s. dacanjs do Regno de daque conconjs do 
Regno de goa Canaris Do Reino de narsijmga cada huu tem sua pro- 
ujnemcia '/ .s. 

E porque estas terras sam do Rey de narsingua detremjney De tratar 
aq do Regno E posto que tam conuenyemte fora falar Delle na bamda 
de choromadell. Domde he moor sor E porque aq senhorea direi huu 
pouq 0 & o all sera Da bamda De choromamdell quamdo se dellafalar//. 

Ho Regno de narsimgua he cousa gramde & mt° homrrada. de 
huua bamda comfina com ho Regno De daquem & de guoa & esta 
parte he canarjm cuja 9idade pmcipall he bizanaguar. homde o Rey 
esta. dasemto Da bamda De gamges na sayda Do mar. comfina com 
alguua parte do senhorio Do Reino de bemgala E com ho Reino 
Dorixa Da bamda da terra fijrme com as serranjas De delly Da bamda 
do maar ociano com as provimcias Do malabar & de choromadell & 
benua qujlim// 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


35 1 

Amtigamemte ho Regno De narsijmga era mujt 0 maior do que ora 
he senhoreava q a sy o Reino De daquem athee bemgala e emtrando 
aquj orixa •/ emtrando aquj todallas proujncias maritimas aguora 
nom he tamanho que daqem E guoa & o malabar E orixa tem Rex 
com tudo he gramde cousa. deixamdo ho Reino De dely esta he a 
moor proujmcia. destas partes segundo Dizem das Jndias 

ho Rey he Jemtio canarim de nagao E doutra parte quelim e sua 
aite amda a lingoagem trauada em sua arte amda a limgoagem trauada 
mas seu naturall he canarim he este Rey guerreiro amda mujtas 
vezes em campo com mais de qoremta mjll homes de cauallo gemte 
de pee gramde numero tera qujnhemtos alifamtes Dos qees seram ij e 
de peleja tem sempre guerra ora com orixa ora com daque ora na 
propia terra tem gramdes capitaees tem mujta gemte a soldo quamdo 
Repousa he em biznagar cidade De vimte mjll vizinhos Jaz amtre 
Duas serras as casas nam sam geerall memte mujto adomadas as 
casas ou pacos do Rey sam bem obradas gramdes E o Rey bem acom- 
panhado De fidalguos gemtes de cauallo tem gramdes senores con- 
siguo he mujto acatado amdam e sua corte mjll mogas Jograees E 
omees Do mesmo oficio quoatro cimqo mjll estes sam quelijs he nom 
canarijs porque os naturaes Desta proujngia De talimg 0 sam mais 
autos nas gragaas E arremedar q em outras partidas Daquij se espa- 
lham pa nestas tres Jndias mujta Jemte destes ho mais se dira na 
Descricam do out° seu senhorio // 

Acabada a primeira Jmdia por mangalor terra De canaris etrado Jmdia 
sam na segd a ymdia ou meya que se comega de mayciram primeiro 
porto da terra Do malabar E acabarsea no Rijo ganges polas comfrom- 
tacoees do Reino de bemgala E sera esta terra, de que he o presemte 
Recomtamento diujdida em duas ptes na primeira se dira da terra do 
malabar quam gramde he quamtos portos tem em q ha naaos quamtos 
Rex tem com que custumes viuem quern he modr nesta pro- 
ujngia E tambem se dira do trato deste/ malabar E de quamtas naaos 
tem 

Na segumda parte se tratara do Rey de narsimgua & de sua terra 
com quern peleja que gemte tem de cauallo E alguma cousa de seus 
costumes he tarn bem Da camtidade do Reino falamdo alguu pouco 
do trato que tambem tem seus portos // 



352 


TOM]* PIRES 


Fol. i26v. 


Proujmcia 

do 

malabar 


Serras que 
deujdem 
o Malabar 
de nar- 
synga 


Cremfa 

do 

malabar 


E despois Dirsea do Reino dorixa ou odia & sera nosa Jmdia 
segunda ou meya Explanada segumdo a posybilidade/. 

A prouimcia do malabar come9a De may^era porto DellRey de 
banignar q comfromta com mamgalor terra De canarijs DellRey De 
narsimgua E acaba no cabo de comorjm terra DellRey De coulao que 
comfromta com o dito rreino De narsymgua na proujncia De ta- 
limguo / pola bamda da terra firme he cerq a Da toda esta terra De 
serranjas que a Diujdem Do dito Reino de narsingua sera toda esta 
terra polas beiras do maar De cemto & dez atee cemto & vimte 
leguoas E pola bamda da terra firme athee serra. a lugares sera cimquo 
leguoas & a lugares xb E desta maneira corre sem ser menos nem 
mais 

Sam estas terras tam altas que nom comsemtem os nordestes he 
lestes pasar a costa da Jmdia. nem polo comtrairo os suduestes & 
oestes nom vemtam no rregno De narsijmgua -s- se vimdo De ceilam 
pa a costa da Jmdia com ventos frescos Dos sobreditos chegamdo 
5esam se da Jmdia pa choromandel partem com hos ponentes tamto 
que abocam o canal De ceilam nom vemtam Domde se segujo que ho 
malabar por care?er De vemtos sequos he fresca E graciosa E a 
proujncia De choromandell por careper dos humedos he esterile sem 
aruore pequena. nem gramde como se mais larga memte Dira em sua 
Descri9am abaste quanto a isto/. 

Todo malabar cree a trimdade como nos padre filho espu samto 
tres pesoas huu soo ds verdadeiro/ Desde cambaia athee bemgala todo 
gemtio tern ysto como se dira mais largamemte na descr^am da terra 
Domde Jaz sam thomee apostollo/ /. 

Nom me deuia meter nas cosas Do malabar por ser tam notorio a 
vosa altez a em q tem tam fermosas tres fortalezas gramdes he homrra- 
das .s. a de calecut E a de cochim com muj gramde albacar feito tudo 
ysto de quaall De cascas de meygeas E a de cananor De fremosas 
cavas E bem asemtada/ mas por a ordem Do prometido hijr ao cabo 
fa90 de todo mem9am nesta viagem 

A gemte do malabar he preta & della ba9a parda. som todollos Rex 
Jemtios bramenes ou De casta De seus sacerdotes a limguoagem he 
toda huua. easy / asy como em Jtalia Diferem em pouca cousa he toda 



PLATE XXXV 



21) of the West Coast of Africa, between 
8 and 5°N. (p. 520) 




PORTUGUESE TEXT 


353 

a terra muyto pouoada avera neste malabar cemto & cimqoemta mjll 
naires homees De peleja Despada he adarg a E frecheiros sam homees 
que adoram o seu Rey E por casso o Rey morre em batalha sam obri- 
gados a morrer E se o nom fazem Diferemse da terra. E ficam JmJuri- 
ados pa sempre/ sam os naires leaes nom tredores/ primeiro que huu 
Rey do malabar peleje com out 0 lho hade fazer saber primeiro q se 
preceba/ he asij seu costume todo naire nom pode amdar De sua casa 
fora eomo he pa tomar armas sem suas armas tamto que nom he 
licito ao naire amdar sem ellas ajmda que seja De ?em annos. & 
quamdo esta pa morrer sempre tem Junto comsiguo a espada & adarg a 
tarn perto q se lhe comprir que a posa tomar costumam todos fazer 
gramde Reuere^ia aos m tes q hos emsinam em tamto q ho melhor dos 
naires se achar huu /maquaa/. se algua cousa lhe emsinou. se o em- 
comtra faz lhe a Reueremcia. emtam vayse lauar //. se o naire acha em 
huu camjnho outro naire mais velho adorao & dalhe ho camjnho se 
esteuerem Dous tres quatr 0 Jrmaos ho mais velho ha destar asemtado 
E os out°s em pee//. 

E porque a Jemte primfipall do malabar sam os bramenes domde Fol. i2jr. 
os Rex decemdem E sam mais fidallguos por causa de seu sacerdo9io 
se dira primeiro delies he Despois dos naires E das outs a gera^oees/ 

Bramenes sam sacerdotes que trazem huua linha depemdurada do 
ombro ezquerdo p° De baixo Do bra$o dirto he de vimte sete fios 
feitos em tres a melhor geracam destes sam chatrias E depois pata- 
dares E apos estes nambuderis & os mais somenos namburis trazem 
estes bramenes o nacimemto mujto amtiqsymo sam de samgue mais 
limpo que os naires/ tem estes carguo Destar no turuqois rrezamdo 
sam emtemdidos nas cousas De sua creem^a os mais homrrados Destes 
estam com ho Rex do malabar sam homees q nom comem nenhuua 
cousa que fose viua De samgue he por esta causa pronun9iarom os 
antiguos delies que nom fose nimgue poderoso no malabar comer 
vaq a sopenna De morte E de gramde peq a do a Rezam seria p° 
comerem o leite as bramjnas pois emgeitarom a carne Domde pro- 
cedeo tanto a estima nas vacas que em mujta parte de gentios adora a 
vaq a como cousa santa. estes bramenes tem poder Descomungar & 
absoluer nenhuu nom traz armas nem vay a guerra nen se mata por 

H.C.S. II. 


i 



fisicos do 
malabarl 


JmJuria 

no 

malabarl 


354 TOMri PIRES 

nenhuu caso por que o mere^a framcam te amdam por homde qerem 
posto q seja em guerra// 

Mujta Jemte do malabar asij naires como bramenes & suas 
molheres & tambem na gemte baixa geerall memte a quarta ou qmta 
parte de todos tem as pnas mujto grosas & Jnchadas de gramde 
grosura E morrem diso he he cousa feea De Vr Dizem que procede 
Das augas por homde pasam por que a terra he apaulada chamamse 
pericaees na linguoagem Da terra E toda esta Jmchacam he Jgoall- 
memte Dos giolhos pa baixo E nom tem door nem se semtem da taall 
Jmfermidade/. 

Na terra Do malabar no AJumtamemto seu tem por costume que a 
femea tem os olhos na cama E o macho no telhado E Jsto geerall 
memte amtre gramdes & pequenos E o all tem por estranho E alheo 
dejsuas comdicoees E alguns portugueses trosnados (?) na terra nom 
lhe pare9e feeo / 

Nas Jmfirmidades nom comem carne hos doemtes somemte 
pescado tem por dieta o primcipall Remedio he tamgerenlhe ataba- 
quees & out°s soos dous tres dias q dizem que tem Vrtude. se tem 
febres comem pescado & lauanse mujtas vezes se vomjtam lauanlhe a 
cabe9a com augua fria E he bom vaise logo se tem fruxo gramde 
bebem aguoa De lanha. que he quoquo nouo estanq a lloguo se querem 
purgar bebem folhas de figueira de Jnferno pisadas ou o cumo ou a 
sememte E purgam mujto & com a purga se lauam se som feridos De 
gramdes feridas azeite De quoquo qemte escorrer huua ora he Duas 
oras sobre a ferida cada dia Duas vezes & sam saos / os nosos homees 
com febres comem galinhas gordas E bebem v° & sam saoos a mujtos 
acomtece Jsto & os q se poem em a dieta gastamse// 

A cousa que se no malabar estima por pior he que a quern quero 
mall se lhe quebro huua panella noua a sua porta he gramde Jmfa- 
mja :/ ou pasamdo pola Rua se lha aRemesam & que quebre Jumto com 
a tall p a he pior/ sam casos de morte estes pa o que o comete E o que o 
pasa fica desomrrado pa sempe//. 

hos Rex do malabar todos sam bramenes D estes fios delles De 
geracam mais fydalguos delles menos porque ho costume do malabar 
he que o filho do Rey nom socede o Reino somemte o Jrmao ou 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


sobrinho E porque estes sam bramenes he nom podem casar com 
naires por ser defesso catam dos mais homrados bramenes Daquella 
geera?am pa fazerem casta nas Jrmaas pa o mais velho soceda he 
Desta man a os bramanes dormem com as Jrmaas do Rey & delies 
saee os Rex do Malabar o Rey de cochim como seja samgue mais 
apurado E nom aVr na terra com quern case se ha patamares 
bramenes de cambaya que sam amtiguos paremtes do rrey bramina q 
em outs° tempos foy naquelas partes samto destes escolhem pra 
geracam & qmdo nom tomam a da terra dos mais fidalguos bramenes 
neste costume estam Desde trimta mjl annos seg° comtam & 

Os Reis do malabar casam quamtas vezes querem & despois de Fol. 127V. 
terem as molhers as dam em casamemto a guisa da terra a pesoas 

Costume 

homrradas os fs° dos Rex sam naires como os outs 0 nom herdam nada j os Feis 
mujtos dos Rex casam por arras as vezes os tern sempre athe ssua { b 
morte'/ se quail quer Rey do malabar quer a molher Do mais homrra- 
do samgue q tenha caimaees vem de boam te & os taees Caimaees 
ficam mujto homrrados mujtas vezes os gramdes senhores dam Dr° 
aos patamares por que leuem a virgumdade a suas molheres e estam 
os patamares mas tamto me dares// 

todos os bramenes sam casados herdam seus fs° suas fazemdas sam 
as bramjnas molheres castas nom tern ajuntamento somemte com seu 
marido E a bramjna sempre ho he E seus filhos nom se mesturam 
pode a bramjna dormir com naires qmdo qser E o naire nom com 
bramjna//. 

hos naires nenhuu nom tern pay nem fxlho nom casam as nairas Inaires do 
qmtos mais amiguos tem tamto sam mais homrradas Desta maneira malabar l 
huua molher naira tem huua f a duas ou tres escolhe huu naire pa cada 
huua e tempo De sua virgimdade E casaa com elle pa a Romper fezem 
festa em q ho naire gasta segumdo hee esta quoatro dias com ella e 
synall De a Romper lamca lhe huu pequeno Douro ao pescofo De 
valia de xxx ta Rs chamase /quete/ vaise este vem out e s naires comcer- 
tamse huu lhe da hua cousa outro outra quamtos mais tem tamto 
mais homrrada he tambem os naires tem suas Despesas espalhadas 
por out a s polla mor parte nom comem os naires em casas Dellas & por 
ysto nunca naire teue pay ne f° porque cada huua tem dous athee dez 



IGera- 
foees Do 
malabar) 


Fol. I 28 r. 
Cobras 


356 T0M1* PIRES 

os sabidos de que tem merecimento amtre elles tambem ha naires q 
vemdem azeite & peixe E mujtos sam ofyciaees macanjquos/ 

Se quallquer naira se fose fora de sua casa E lhe tocase huu home 
da casta dos poleaas com ha maao ou com huua pedra fica pa o 
matarem ou vemdere E se o tall lhe tocase Jmdo em companhia De 
naire nom fica empoliada ysto se fez por nom Jrem catar a gemte baxa 
se o que ha toca se toma morre polio tall crime/ nenhuua virtude 
sabem as nairas do malabar nem eyxercicio De coser nem laurar 
somemte comer & folguar//. 

No malabar nom pode ser o filho mais homrrado q ho pay De 
maneira q ha bramina seus fs° o sam & o naire sempre o hee E todo 
oficiall mecanjquo ou Jograees camtores feiticeiros o filho segue 0 
oficio Do pay De necesyDade & 

A mais baixa sam pareos q comem vaq as sam letrados feiticeiros os 
poleas sam lauradores & os beituaas/ os mainates lauamdeiros os 
yravas pedr°s os ploeaas sam tangedores nos turucoees o em festas / os 
canjares sam balhadores nos templlos & paguodes os macuaas Pes- 
cadores os canacos fazem sail Depos estes carpinteiros orivezes & 
todo out 0 oficio macanjq 0 & depos estes hos Jrauaas homees q fazem 
os vinhos todos estes nom pasam polas estradas Dos naires E fogem 
dellas sopena de morte he em caso de necessidade hos naires & 0 Rey 
asy como na guerra e e doemcas e em esgrimas Joguos Despadas 
lamias se podem toquar com elles & lauamse & ficam limpos e em 
qualquer cousa que comprir ao naire desta gemte se neguogea seu 
proveito nom tem pecado todas estas na^oees o filho herda a fazemda 
do pay E sam casados cada huu com huua molher//. 

Acerqua das out a s meudezas desta proujmgia que tem gramdes 
Jdolatrias E feiticarias E fortes gemtilidades nom me amtremeto por 
que Ja dela tera sabido todas suas comdifoees E por nom ser materea 
tocante ao presente Recomtamemto/. 

Ha nesta proujmcia cobras de capello E de bafo as de capello sam 
pequenas pretas de grosura de huu dedo poleguar tem de compi- 
memto tres quoatro palmos tem presas tem sobre ha cabe?a o 
coiro froxo quamdo se emcrespa faz maneira de cobertur a a que 
chamam capello se estas mordem matam loguo as de bafo dizem que 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


357 

sam deste tamanho & de grosura do collo do brago sem capello E que 
soo do ar matam nunq a vy omem q ha vise as de capello trazem 
feiticeiros em panellas asy gemtios como mouros E com certo som 
as fazem no cham amdar bulimdo tomannas com a maao sem medo 
com palauras q lhe Dizem & se as vezes hos mordem morrem se 
amdam brauas no mato estes feiticeiros as tomam e emcamtam/ ho 
naire & bramenes nom podem por ley matar as cobras Dizem que 
sam cousas samtas em suas ortas tern lugares apartados pa ellas// em 
q lhe dam aRoz cozido/' 

ha nesta proujmcia do malabar qinze mjll xstaoos do tempo de sam xstaaos 

thome apostollo Dos quaees dous mill seram homees homrrados nesta , . 

r 1 J proujmfia 

cavaleiros mercadores gemte estimaDa & os out°s sam oficiaees gemte 
pobre sam na terra privilegiados E tocamse com os naires abitacam 
destes xstaoos he de chetua atee coulam fora daquj nom ha xpaaos dos 
amtiguos nom fallo dos que som tornados em tempo de vosa altez a 
nem nos q se tornam cada dia q sam mujtos/. 

Nesta terra do malabar he huua parte que tern gramdes Rios em sy Terra do 
que a fazem forte em que pescam/ a lugares alto & baixo em que ma ^ a ^arq 
nauegam em gramdes tones .s. de panane athee coulaoo he esta terra 
a outra do malabar he enxuta & boa pa camjnhar por terra & esta 
entones catures /. 

comecamdo de mamgalor pa comorim estes sam hos Rex na /'Reis no 
proujmcia. Do malabar/ elRey de bangar ellRey Dacata ellRey de malabar l- 
cananor ellRey De calecut elRey de tanor ellRey de cramganor ellRey 
De cochim ellRey de caya coulam ellRey de coulam ellRey de tra- 
uamcor ellRey De comorim tern esta terra gramdes caimaes que delies 
sam mayores q mujtos Reis destes mas nom tem titollo De Rex Delies 
bramenes delles naires destes Reis o maior em terra he Jemte he o De 
coulam em fidallguja o de cochim em titollo o de calecut em gemte 
depos coulam Cananor E depos cananor o de caia coulam os melhores 
homees De peleja sam os do Reyno de calecut/ 

hos portos do maar nesta proujmcia e que ha pouoagoees E naaos p 0 rtos de 

sam os segujmtes/ maygeram/ mayporam/ combula/ coty coulam/ maar 

nesta 

njliporam/ hyeri/ balea patanam / cananor/ tarmapatam/ marlarjanj/ p r0 . 
combaa / pudopatanam/ tiricorij / bairacono/ coulam/ aquechamam/ U J m fta 



358 TOM ^ PIRES 

pamdaranj / capocar/ calecut/ chaliaa/ para purancorj/ tanor/ panane/ 
bely/ ancoro / chetua/ cramganor / cochim/ caya coulam/ coulam 
bilinjao/ comorim / 

Auera nesta proujmgia De malabar nos Regnos & portos Ja ditos 
quoatrocemtas naos de cargua Dellas gramdes Dellas pequenas sam 
naaos ladas largas por baixo carreguam mujto & demamdam menos 
fumdo que as de qujlha ysto se fez porq geerall memte o malabar 
naueg a na provimcia De tallmguo em que sam as Regioees De co- 
morim athe paleacate E porque ceilam faz canall com esta trra E no 
meio he de baixa mar De braga & mea que se chamam os baixos 
chilam foy necesario fazeremse ladas/ esta he a causa nom nauegam 
estes em golfao/ saluo com gramde medo/ Dout°s navios pequenos a 
que chama pagueres que carreguam tamto como carauellas tern mais 
dout°s tamtos & 


laRoz 

domde 

vemj 


toda esta proujmcia do malabar care9e daRoz E de seu natural nom 
tern easy nada Da bamda de tanor athee maigeram se fornege de guoa 
he narsing a Da bamda dos canaris/ este aRoz he frio E vail atee tanor 
De tanor athe coulam vem Da proujmcia de talinguo por choroman- 
dell este aRoz he quemte & gastase atee tanor / domde he de saber que 
homde tern valor o a arroz De choromandell nom vail o de guoa & 
canarjs asy polo comtrairo homde vail o de canarijs nom vail o out 0 a 


terca & m a parte menos//. 

Fol. 128V. ho porto de mayceram E mayporam sam dellRey de bamgar aquj se 
comega ho malabar he este Rey vizinho dos canarjs he terra abastada 
tifdo'dos Darroz pescados a gemte deste Reino posto que seja pouca he guer- 
portos aos re ira sam gramdes frecheiros as setas De ferros compridos larguos 
Reinos Defemdem sua terra E as vezes tern guerra com hos canarijs he Reino 


ElURey 
da cota 


Regno de 
canandr 


pequeno estes dous ptos De maar tem alguuas naaos E pouoacoees 
tratam com os desta provjngia / 

Ho Rey de cota nom tem no maar porto todo seu poder he na terra 
firme he Reino como ho de cima tem guerra com cananor faz este 
moeda comtra vomtade Dos Rex do malabar sem temer nenhuu delles 
sam gramdes Jmiguos E este he o Rey de cananor he a Jemte forte 
Deste he a terra E daqi sam os fanoes Da cota//. 

Ho porto De combulaa / coti coulam njliporam hieri balca patamam 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


359 

Cananor tarmapatam mailariavij sam DellRey De cananor. todos 
estes portos sam cousa pouca. ssomemte ho porto De cananor que he 
gramde nobre homrrado De grande cidade & trato he este Reyno De 
cananor gramde De mujta gemte a terra he boa tern boos ares E boas 
auguas tern mujtos mouros a cidade de cananor tern mercadores 
caudellosos/ se o poder de .v. a. nom fora sobre este Reyno Ja fora de 
mouros por que huu mamalle mercar se fazija Ja poderosso ha nesta 
terra mujtos espimgardeiros frecheiros naires Despada & adargua ho 
Rey he bramene De barba mujto comprida sinall mais mourisco que 
De sacerdote getio malabar-/ 

ho porto De combaa / pudupatanam/ tiricorj pamdarane capocar Regno de 
calecut chalia pariporaary sam Do Reino De calecut sam portos 
pequenos todos estes tern naaos E mercadores E boas pouoa90oes 
chamase o Rey De Calicut 9amorim quer Dizer S 5 r de todos os 
malabares comfyna este Reino com cananor De huua bamda E da 
outra com tanor Digo com estes Reinos o porto De calicut nom he 
boom por ser emcosta De maar a cidade he gramde De mujta gemte 
& mujto trato De mujtos mercadores asy malabares como quellijs 
chetijs E estramgeiros De todas partidas asy mouros como gemtios he 
mujto nomeado porto he a melhor cousa De todo ho malabar aquj 
tinham gramdes cassas De feitorias mujtas na9oes cada huu trazja 
aquj suas mercadorias E aquj se fazia gramde come^io troca escambo 
he lugar gramde memtado he em toda esta bamda Dasya por cousa 
homrrada enterra he este Reino menos que no De cananor tern melhor 
Jemte De guerra he terra bem asombrada fazem aqui mujtos panos de 
seda E comseruas/ Este Rey posto que tenha ho nome gramde nom 
lhe obede9em mais q em seu Regno E as vezes mall E porque nom 
comto estorias nom fa90 fumdam t0 Deste titollo somemte Dizem os 
malabares q ouue neste malabar huu Rey De toda a terra malabar E 
que embutido por mouros se foy camjnho de meq a fezse mouro este 
morreo em o Reino De tufar amte Dabocar ho estreito Ja partijo do 
malabar fora de seu syso Repartijo toda a terra E despois de a ter 
dada cheguou huu paremte seu a pedirlhe Deulhe a terra da cidade de 
calecut que era cousa pouca he ho titollo ficou atheeora chamarse asy 
por Rezam da neguoceaca se fez ho Reino De calecut cousa homrrada/. 



TOME PIRES 


Regno de 
tanor. 


/Regno de 

cram- 

ganor/ 


Fol. I2gr. 

Regno de 
cochimj 


Reino De 

cay a 

coulam 


360 

tanor tem mujtas naaos nom tem outro porto de maar he Rey 
homrrado de boa terra nom tamanho como qualicut /' tem mujta 
Jemte he Rey paremte dos Reis de cochim tem mujtos moradores e 
sua terra, he Rey bramene homrrado/. 

hos portos de panane/ beli/ amcoro/ chetuaa. com as terras que cada 
huus tem sam portos De naaos E mercadores & de boas pouoa^Ses sam 
de senhores bramenes E caimaees p as homrradas as vezes se emcostam 
com quern querem as vezes nam Amtigua memte mais segujam ho 
bamdo de calecut aguora cada huu por sy ou como lhe vem a vomtade 
sam cada huu destes gramdes como algus Rex do malabar & do pouo 
De cada huu sam chamados Rex mas nam dos out°s Reis & senhores//' 

Ho Regno de caganor De huua parte se ajunta a terra de chatua & 
da out a ao Reino De cochim cramganor foy amtiga mente homrrado 
he bom porto tem m ta gemte & boa terra a cidade De cramganor he 
homrrada De trato gramde ante De se fazer cochim nobre este Rey 
ora se emcosta a cochim por que tem cochim deste Reyno parte nas 
Remdas ora a calecut as vezes a nengue he paremte DelRey De 
cochim nom he Reino mujto gramde//. 

o Reino De cochim he cousa mujto pequena E muy t0 gramde ho 
Reino nom he mais q ha Jlha de vaipi E a de cochim que ambas teram 
sejs mjll homees naires tem senhores Junto com este Reino tamanho 
& mayores que ho Reyno todos estes aguora sam vasallos dellRey De 
cochim polio poder que tem De vosa alteza he he aguora mor que 
todos E cabe£a De toda a terra Do malabar E mais homrrado q todos 
E mais estimado tem boa cidade he bom porto he mujtas naaos trata 
gramdememte he a melhor cousa que ha nestas partes he o Rey 
bramene amtre todos maior he sumo pomtifiquo Desta terra traz 
comsyguo sempre muytos caimaees pesoas mujto homrradas E 
mujtos bramenes// 

ho Reino De caya coulam De huua parte comfyna com terras dos 
senhoreos do Reino de cochim E da outra com ho Regno De coulam 
he Rey gramde de terra como calecut E maior tem alguu trato em sua 
terra E alguuas naaos E mercadores nom mujtos he Rey homrrado 
De mujta Jemte he p a estimada he Riq° E gramde sor tem mais 
naaos que coulao / /. 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


361 


o Reino De coulao de huua bamda comfyna com ho Regno de caya 
coulao & da out a com ho Reino De travamcor tern alem do porto de 
coulam o porto de bilinjao este Rey he maior Do malabar em terra E 
gemtetemestea cidadede coulam he gramde escalla De naaos De muj- 
tos mercadores Dediuersas partes tratam gramdementeneste Reino he 
gramde s 5 r tinha este por vasallo ellRey De 5eilam ho prim5ipall se lhe 
pagaua em cada huu anno De pareas he trebuto quoremta alefamtes 
os qees no Recebe Ja aguora despois Do poder De vosa altez a 
ser na Jmdia he gramde o trafig 0 De Regno De coulam tem mujtas 
naaos//. 

o Rey de trauanqor De huua parte he com qoulam & da out a 
comfynam com o cabo De comorim nom tem no mar somemte poucas 
casas na terra firme he grande sor & pesoa homrrada. De boa terra 
De gemte guerreira compra este mujtos cavallos & deste Reino vam 
pa o Reino De narsimgua tem mujta gemte he boa nas beiras Do maar 
tem pouoacoes de maquas q da noua na terra da chegada das naaos 
E seruem no Desembarcar dos cauallos // 

De huua parte com travanqor & da outra atee qaile que he seu ho 
pmcep e de comorim he Rey De coulao p morte Do Rey De coulam 
tiramdo a terra do Reino de travamcor esta terra De comorim Ja nom 
he boa como as out a s nom tem palmeiras saluo cousa pouqa/ 

Todos os Reis q viuem no malabar huus com out°s tem comtinoa- 
dam te guerra na terra por que o naire nom pode comer no mar porque 
lhe he defeso por sua creenga. salluo com licemga de seu maior bramene 
em casso De mujta necesidade osbramjnes mujto menos entrano maar / / 
ha nesta terra do malabar tones catures batees de Remo compridos 
cerados por cima quamto huu omem pode emtrar Dilhargua voga 
cada huu de dez ate xx te Remos sam ligeiros & ha gramde soma Destes 
e que amdam frecheiros sam De maquas arees sam estes arees maquas 
p as De gemte Riq os E a mujtos nesta costa E se acham naao em cal- 
marias a Remo a leuam homde querem comtra votade Dos da naao 
porque sam gramdes frecheiros/ he a Jemte baixa do malabar mujto 
pobre E sam gramdes ladroees/ mais gemte ha no malabar De naires 
he bramjnes q das out a s nagooes//. 

Em todo o malabar nom pode nengue cobrir casa De telha. saluo se 


Regno de 
coulao 


Regno de 
travam- 
cor 


Regno De 
comorim 



TOM ^ PIRES 


Trato de 
merca- 
daria no 
malabar 


Fol. I2gv. 


merca- 
dorias do 
malabar 


362 

for turicoll ou mezqujta ou casa Dalguu gramde caimall por mere ee/& 
isto por se nom fazere fortes na terra E isto gardam os Rex Do malabar 
gramdememte/ chamanse Caimaees Senhores De terras E vasallos ha 
no malabar caimall De dez mjll naires E outs 0 De cemto & Duzemtos 
Naires / 

A terra Do malabar tern Jmfynjdade De palmeiras arequeiras ao 
longuo Do mar E nom se estemde pa a terra firme somente a leguoa 
& m a & o mais athee Duas o fruito da palmeiras chamam quoquos & 
nos nu9es Jmdie & o fruito Das arequeiras chamam areqas he nos 
avelana. Jmdie tern Destes Jmfinjdade tern mujto betelle tratam os 
mercadores deste malabar Da bamda da persya athee cambaya & 
Resputes/ Da bamda de choromamdell athe paleacate e em ceilam E 
nas Jlhas de diva neste malabar todollos mercadores q trata no maar 
sam mouros he estes tern o trato em peso sam gramdes mercadores | 
E boos comtadores tern estes mercadores naires a solldo que os acom- 
panham he destes naires alguns sam seus espuaaes E sam melhores 
comtadores que os mouros// alguus dos malabares se tornauam mouros 
a primeira Ja aguora nom//. 

copra que sam coquos sequos sem casca coquos maduros aReq a 
betelle aguqr de pallmeiras a que chamam Jagra azeite De coquo Cairo 
pimemta gingiure tamarimdos mirabulanos a pimemta avera no 
malabar atee vimte mjll bahares E na£e de chatua athee o Reino De 
caya coulam E alguua pouca por coulam por cramganor E cochim he 
a escala Desta pimemta a mais perto E omde mais ganham a levam 
ajmda que seja com trabalho cramganor nem cochy nom tern pimem- 
ta em suas terras mas os S res q viuem Jumto com estes dous Reinos a 
Recolhem & vendem a q nacee no senhorio Do Reino De cochim e 
melhor// 

Gingivre avera nestas partes De malabar cada huu anno De dous 
mjll qintaes pa cima nage De calecut athee cananor a da terra De 
calecut he moor & melhor E sem fios o De cananor he somenos a for?a 
deste he de calecut & o menos De cananor// 

Mirabulanos cetrinos Jndios qublicos beleriqos ha nesta proujneia 
hos matos cheos geerall memte por toda & tambem ha alguus ta- 
marjndos//. 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


363 

quoquos As palmeiras he a forsa do Regno De cananor athee 
birinjao no Regno De coulam De birinjao pa diamte athee choro- 
mamdell he cousa q se podera comtar por ser cousa muj pouca E 
cassij nada/. 

Caregamsse destes quoquos sequos muj tos pa fora he boa 
mercadoria todallas naaos os levam fazem Delles azeite & tambem 


comemse 

Areca he muj t0 gramde mercadaria de que todos carregam geerall 
memte pa cabaia porque pa choromandell a moor parte vay de celam 
como se dira e ceilam ha mujta neste malabar leuase seqa em camti- 
dade a forfa dela nestas partes nace De cochim atee cananor E disto 
carregam polla maior parte & dos quoquos// 

Ho quairo tambem he da terra chamamos q a quairo ao esparto q 
dizemos/ somemte o cairo he da lanugem ou cobertura das nozes 
Jndicas sobre a casca macada he fiada a sua guisa a obra deste cairo 
he boa sostem todo trabalho E nom se dana se nom com ser molhada 


dauga do?ee com ella apodrece qua n5 se vsam out a s emxar^eas nem 
amarras saluo de cairo he boa mercadoria nestas partes/ Das Jlhas de 
diva vem muj to como se dira e seu luguar/ / 

De maneira que os malabares mouros navegamtes & tratamtes da 
bamda de Diu trazem suas mercadorias E da bamda de choromamdell 


ceilam & diua E tem bom trato em o malabar primcipall memte e 
calecut acodem as mais mercadarias//. 

chamase o Rey De cambay a coltam madaforxaa a seu pay chamaua 
coltam mafamud tem este Rey guerra com ellRey De mandao E com 
ellRey Jmdo & com os Resputes he alguua com delij portamto falarey 
nestes huu pouq 0 // 

Este Rey de dely Jaz na terra firme Antigamemte era a terra deste a 
moor que q a avija era De ssua Jurdicam os Resputes cambay a he 
parte do Regno De daque ellRey de madao ellRey dimdo vay a terra 
Deste cimgemdo toda a provimcia de narsymga he vay fazer comti- 
noada memte guerra aos bemgallas & aos Reis do sertaoo que comfi- 


Fol. i3or. 
Do Rejno 
de cam- 
bay' 1 {he 
antes que 
os Reinos 
na terra 
canarjm e 
apos cam- 
bay a hos 
canarts )* 


1 The words here placed within brackets were added in the same hand as 
the original manuscript, but with different ink or a different pen. The trans- 
lation is: ‘It is before the kingdoms in the land of Kanara, and after Cambay 
come the Kanarese.’ 



Rey de 
mamdao 


Regno 

dimdo 


364 TOME PIRES 

nam com orixa E com orixa era gemtijo de cemto & cimqoemta annos 
sam os Reis de delij mouros e todos estes RegnSs tinha capitaees cada 
huu se alevamtou & se fez Rey asij ho fez o de cambay a / metense 
amtre cambaia & delij grades serranjas De maneira que nom pode 
vijr sobre cambay a somemte metese huu paso na terra que ho tem huu 
Jogue guzarate que nom comsemte emtrar ha gemte De delij em 
cambay a E quamdo este Rey espeue ao Rey de cambay a chamalhe ao 
meu vazir ou capitam este Rey de delij tem gramde terra muj t0 
motuosa. estas serranjas que pasam por sua terra he ho momte 
/ caucaso De que falam os cosmoguafos tem a terra Deste mamti- 
memtos sem comto Jemte cavallos alifamtes tem Jmfinydade de 
gemtios sem numero e seus Reynos estemdese seu Regno pola terra 
demtro mujto este se chama Rey das Jmdias tem este Rey contino- 
adamemte Demtro na terra sua abitacam & 

Na frallda desta serranja comfinamdo com as terras De cambay a he 
o Reino De mandao este he o Regno omde amtiguamemte pelejauam 
as molheres que nos Dizemos amazonas aguora nom vsam da meli?ia/ 
ficoulhe ajmda ho cafar acavallo com esporas he bursegijs a sua 
guissa dize q tera este Rey ajmda molheres que cavallgam com elle 
atee duas mjll tem este Rey mujta gemte he a terra sua fraguosa & 
forte/ tambem comfyna mamdao com os Resputes he obidiemte a 
ellRey De delij este Rey de mamdao/ he este Rey mouro ha pouco 
tempo If 

O Regno dimdo he Ja comuertido ao Reino de cambay a sam Ja 
todos mouros he cousa pequena. he terra momtuosa dizem q daquj 
vem ho anjll & que nace neste alguu lacar pouco/ & dos Resputes 
mamdao & delij vem mujtas mercadorias das que se acham em 
cambay a e espalha por estes tambem suas mercadorias por que os 
out°s sam firmes este De cambaya tem ho mar digo por delij mamdao 
Jmdo&out°s//. 

Este Regno Jmdo foy amtigamemte muj t0 nomeado esta na terra 
firme he Deste Regno corre huu Rijo q vem sair ao maar que se 
chama ?imdy outs 0 lhe chamam Jmdy E os do Regno Jmdios/ este 
aparta os Resputes De cambaia foy este reino cabefa De cambay a 
Daquj se comecam as Jndias E por causa Deste Reino se chamou 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


365 

ellRey De cambay a Rey da primeira Jmdia he Rijo gramde na saida q 
faz no maar tem gramde pouoacam de mujtas naaos mercadores 
gentios mouros he guouernador dela huu Jemtio Jmdo/ 

/ Jmdi/ Carapatanj/ patan / Diu/ manna/ tata telaya/ guemdarj f Portosde 
guogarj \j cabaya/ baruez/ ?urrat e/ Reneri/ Dionj/ agagy/ baxa/ C ^ > £ aya 
maimbij //. 

Avera trezemtos annos que o Reino de cambay a he tornado dos AGewm '05 
Jemtios mas ajmda ha em cambaia. mujtos gemtios cassy a ter$a cambaya / 
parte do Regno he majs/ homees que tem por fee nom matarem cousa 
viva nem comerem cousa q teuese samgue haa Jmfinijdade destes/ 
chamamse os Jemtios de cambaya vaneanes Delies sam sacerdotes de 
fremosos templlos a mo5r pte | sam bramenes homees dados a Rele- Fol. 130V. 
giam E outs 0 sam patamares bramenes mais homrrados outs 0 sam 
mercadores como se dira despois sam os Jemtios de cabay a gramdes 
Jdolatras gemtes molles fracas sogeitos ha amtre estes / homees em sua 
Relegiam De boa vida castos verdadeiros homees De mujta austinegia 
creem em nosa Sra E na trimdade nom he Duujda em outro tempo 
serem xstaoos & foise pdemdo a fee por Rezam dos mouros estes 
gemtios espuem Dereito a nosa gisa quamdo estes morrem as molheres 
se queymam as que sam homrradas ou estymam suas omrras na cam- 
bay a ha Destes gemtios ajmda gramdes S res homees q mamdam ho 
Regno amtres os qaes he huu mjlagobimbramjne p a m to estimado em 
syso & em dr° mais avamtajado que todos hos homees deste oriente he 
homem mujto nomeado & de gramde credito sam estes gemtios todos 
de cabellos compridos ha gerafoees amtre estes De barbas compridas 
que as nom podem fazer outs 0 de cabellos compridos tem diuersas 
seitas & creemgas sam sogeitos aos mouros & 

O Regno De cambaia tera de costa de maar setemta ou oitemta Rey de 
leguoas he De demtro nom he mujto gramde como nobre E abastado 
& pulido de gramDes cidades bem muradas & torrejadas fortes os 
S res mouros viuem omradamemte tem mujtos cavallos ha S5r em 
cambaya que tem qujnhemtos seis cemtos cavallos E o mais sam 
eguoas casas pa^oos gramdes & bem obrados o Rey nom he bem 
obedecido por causa do pouo estramgeiro Jeerall mente he o pouoo 
De cambay a pobre & os gramdes Ricos o Rey sera home de qoreta 



tom£ pires 


jtrato de 
cambay a / 


366 

annos chamado 9oltam madaforxaa./ Dizem & afirmam os Rex De 
cambaia serem criados e pecponha por serem mujto luxuriosos em 
tamto q se mosqua se chegua a elle morre/ suas molheres se criam no 
mesmo manjar se cospe he pe9onhemto se outrem veste seus panos 
dizem q morre supitam te oqeu nom creio/ posto q ho afirmam/ he 
este Rey dado a toda maneira de vi90s em comer & luxuria, no all 
Dizem q he sesudo a moor pte estaa atordado Damfiam Recolhido 
com suas molheres/ 

Ho Regno de cambaia tera trimta mjll homees de cauallo tera 
trezemtos alifants dos quaees seram cemto de peleja nas beiras do 
maar a melhor cidade de edifi9ios E de Jemte de guarnjcam hee diu/ 
E que tern mais estramgeiros das cidades do sertao he champanell 
homde he comtinoada memte o asemto dos Reis de cambay a tem 
fremossos pa90S champanell de mujta Jemte limpa os primcipaes 
S res depos o Rey he/ mjlaguobim gemtio Despois he/ chamalc malec/ 
E outro/ asturmalec/ E o quarto codaudam. estes quoatro com ho Rey 
gouemam tudo he cada huu Destes De mujtos de cauallo quamdo vay 
ao paa90 E sam mujto acompanhados sam Senhores naturaes do 
Regno e em que se Reuolue a Justica & gouernam9a Do Reyno E 
fazemda do Rey e estes sam eleitores do Regno quando morre o Rey 
sam estes todos S res de titollo/ tem o Rey molheres & mam9ebas 
athee mjll chamase o Rey Rey da primcipall Jmdia E porque este 
Regno nom he nobre senom por Rezam do trato necesaria cousa me 
pare9e fallar delle//. 

chegado som a falar no trato de cambay a estes sam Jtalianos em 
saber & tratar ha mercadoria. toda a mercadoria de cambaia he em 
maao dos Jemtios chamanse guzarates/ o nome gerall / despois se 
deujdem em Jeracoes vaneanes bramines patamares / certo sem duujda 
estes tem o traoto em sumo sam homes sabidos na mercadoria tem ho 
soo & armonja dela como compre/ em tamto q diz o guzarate que toda 
a JmJuria sobre mercadaria he de pdoar ha estants guzarates por todas 
as partidas fazem huus por out°s & outs 0 por out°s sam homees 
diligemtes soltos em trato comtam por algarismo como nos com as 
nosas propias letras/ sam homees q nom vos dam do seu nem qerem 
nada de cada huus/ polio quail sam athee o presemte estimados e 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


367 


cambay a De ssua gemtilidade vsamdo porque ndbrecem mujto o 
Reyno polio dito trato | haa tambem em cambaya mercadores do Fol. i3ir. 
Cairo estamtes E dadem dormuz mujtos cora?ones E gujlanes que 
todos fazem mercadaria gramdememte nas cidades Do maar em 
cambay a mas todos estes em comparacam dos gemtios nom vem a 
comto E moormemte do saber alij deujam dapremder nosas Jemtes 
que querem ser espuaes E feitores porque ho oficio de fazemda 
ciemcia he sobre sy que nom Jmpede todo outro nobre eixer^io 
mas ajuda mujto// 

sam os patamares de cambaia bramenes mais homrrados Amtiga- pata- 

tnciTBS dc 

memte decemdem Dos Reis de cambaia porque no tempo pasado cam b a i a 
eram os Reis bramenes como o som oje no malabar estes pasam as 
mercadorias polla terra & os mercadores sam muj t0 estimados ajnda 
q pasem por terra de ladroees como os mercadores vam com huu 
destes nom nos Roubam e esta priminemcia tern nestas partes E se os 
Roubam matanse ou feremse com adaguas & os out°s bramjnes com o 
seu samgue vmtam as Jmagees E arrastamas athee lhe fazerem Justi9a 
E fazem lha & tornanlhe o seu / os bramjnes he Jemte mujto estimada 
amtre os gemtios/ e estes sam os mais homrados nom comem cousa 
que fose viua. estes sam os que pasam as cartas se vem de correos por 
q sam seguros dos ladroees/ atras na descricam do malabar achares 
que cousa sam// 

Asij que os guzarates com os estamtes que estam em cambay 3, feita 
cabe?a de mjligobim nauegam mujtas naos pa todas as partes adem a 
ormuz ao Reino de daque guoa baticalla a todo ho malabar ceilam 
bemgala peguu syam pedir pa?ee malaqua onde leuam mujtas merca- 
dorias E Retornam outs a de maneira que fazem cambaya Riq a 
homrrada primcipall memte cambaia lamca dous bracos com ho 
dereito aferra adem E com o out 0 malaqua como navegacoes mais 


primcipaes-E aos outs 0 lugares como a menos principaes // 

hos mercadores do Cairo trazem as mercadarias q vem ditalia & de Como 
gregia de damasqo a adem como he ouro prata azougue vermelham 
cobre auga Rosada chamallotes graas pannos De laa de cores cristali- jcairoj 
nos vidros armas he cousas semelhamtes// 


Adem traz as sobreditas E mais Rujva pasas afiam aguo Rosada com adem. 



TOME PIRES 


368 


Merca- 
darias de 
cambay 0 


Fol. 131V. 

trata com 
hormuz 


com 

daquem & 
guoa com 
ho mala- 
bar <£f 
com out 0 s 


prata ouro em camtidade & cavallos que adem tem de zeila & barbora 
& das Jlhas De ^uaquem que estam no estreito & dos darabia & vem 
fazer seu trato ha cambay a Retornam todalas cousas de malaq a crauo 
noz ma^as samdallos brasijll panos de seda aljofar almjzqr porcelanas 
& o mais se pode ver nas mercadarias De malaq a / & das da terra aRoz 
triguo sabam anjll mamteiguas azeites alaqequas malegua de sortes 
baixa como sevilhana todos panos pa trato De zeila barbora cacotra 
qujloa melimde magadaxoo & lugares outs 0 Darabia E este trato he 
neguociado por naos dadem & por naos de cambaia mujtas De huuas 
& mujtas De outras/. 

E com todas as outras partidas ditas trata trocamdo huuas merca- 
dorias po outs a Emtamto que huuas sem as outras se nom podem 
sosteer quem melhor quiser veer em cada terra as mercadorias sabera 
o que Retornam E nom ho exprimo aq 1 porq em cada terra se veera a 
mercadoria que cada huu tem 

tem todos os pannos de seda que ha nestas partes todollos dalguo- 
dam q sera vimte sortes de panos todos De mujta valia tem alaque- 
quas anjll pouq a lacar naturall da terra pucho cacho afiam mujto & 
bom erva lombrig ra tincall alguodam sabam em mujta camtidade pelles 
cortidas solas mell cera/ De mamtimemtos triguo ceuada mjlho 
azeite de gergelim aRoz mamteigua carnes cousas a estas semelham- 
tes / malegua baixa de sortes todo de seu naturall E quem vem por 
demtro da terra firme dos Reinos vizinhos/ / 

Hos durmuz trazem a cambaia Cauallos prata ouro seda pedra 
vme aziche capaRosa aljofar Retornam Das mercadarias da terra & 
das q tem de malaqua p que todo ho trato De malaqua Das suas 
mercadorias se vinham buscar A cambay a Retornam hos dormuz 
aRoz mamtimemtos por primcipal e especiaria trazem Dormuz 
tamaras moles emfardeladas E out a s em Jarros & out 3 ® sequas de 
tres quatro sortes// 

trata com ho Reino De daquem & guoa & com ho malabar temdo 
feitores em todalas partes q viuem e estam dasemto como ho fazem os 
genoeses em nosas partes/ asy em bemgala/ peguu/ syam / pedir/ 
pa^ee/ quedaa/ Retomado De huuas mercadarias a suas terras 
trazemdo a cada huua as da valia della emtanto q nom ha lugar De 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


3 6 9 


trato omde nom sejam vistos guzarates mercadores a estes Reinos 
vam em cada huu anno naos Do guzarate a cada lugar naao Rota 
batida tinham em calecut os guzarates gramdes feytorias// 

Em malaca fazem mercadores de cambaia mais fumdamemto q em } trato com 
out ra nemhuua parte amtigamemte avija e malaq a mjll mercadores ma ^ aca l 
guzarates E doutrs 0 guzarates homees Do maar que hiam & vinham 
quoat ro cinq 0 mjll homees nom pode viuer malaca sem cambay a nem 
cambay a sem malaq a pa serem mujto Riquas E mujto prosperas/ toda 
a Roupa & cousas do guzarate sam Da valia De malaca & dos Reynos 
que com ella tratam pois as cousas De malaqa nom somemte Deste 
mundo sam estimadas mas do outro que Duujda serem desejados/ 
mais larga memte se falara na descricam de malaq a Das suas merca- 
darias se se tolher a cambay a o trato com mallaq a no viuera por q 
nom tern omde desabafe suas mercadorias/ / 

Hos guzarates forom melhores homees do mar & que mais navega- trato com 

. Jaaoa 

rom que out a s nacoees nestas partes E asij sam em naaos mais avam- 
tajadas de grandez a he em Jemte Do maar tern gramdes pilotos & sam 
dados mujto ao navegar hos Jemtios De cambai 3, E amtigamemte 
os guzarates tinham q nom am De matar nemguem nem em sua 
companhia nom avia damdar home Darmas/ se os tomauam & os 
queriam matar a todos nom Resestiam esta he a ley do guzarate 
nos Jemtios aguora trazem suas naaos mujta Jemte Darmas 
mouros pa defemsam das naaos estes tratauam amte Do descobri- 
memto Do canall De malaq a com a Jaoa pola bamda do sull da Jlha 
De camotora emtrauam antre gumda & a pomta da Ilha de gomotora 
E navegauam agracj domde traziam as cousas De maluq 0 & de 
timor he do ouro E Retornauam mujto Riquos nom ha gem annos 
q deixarom esta nauegagam em agracij estam as qujlhas amcoras 
& cousas das naos guzaratas / q mostram & dizem que ficarom do 
tempo dos guzarates//. 


Porque este Regno de cambaia tinha este trato com malaq a vinham Os mer- 

estas nagoes De mercadores tomar suas companhias com os guzarates ^^vem a 

em suas naaos pa laa E Delas mamdauam suas mercadorias ficamdo fazer suas 

estamtes na terra & delles hiam em pesoa .s. magaris & Jemtes do com P a ~ . 

. nhiasaquj 

Cairo mujtos arabios dadem primcipallmente he com estes abixijs pa 
k H.r s ii malaca 



TO M ^ PIRES 


Fol. I32r. 

Reino De 
daquem 


portos no 
maar 


cidades 
printci- 
paees na 
terra 
firme 


37 ° 

ormuzanos de qujloa melimde magadaxo momba?a persianos .s. 
Rumes turqmaees armenjos gujlanes corafones De xiras destes ha 
mujtos em malaq a E do Reino de daquem mujtos tomauam sua 
companhia em cambaya / he gramde trato o de cambaya leuamdo 
panos de mujtas sortes he boos em caaos (?) & Roupas baixas se- 
memtes .s. alipiuri comjnhos ameos allforua Raizes como de Rvy 
pomtiz a que chamam pu?ha & terra como lacar a q chamam cacho 
estoraq e liqido & outs a bofanjnhas Retornauam carreguados de 
todallas mercadarias Riquas De maluqo bandan china & traziam m t0 
ouro hos guzarates sam as Jemtes a que mais pesou ser malaq a de 
vosa altez a & os que hordenaram a treicam q foy feita a Dioguo lopez 
de seq ra E oje se camta em malaq 3, nas pranas dapagua que ouue 
malaq a polio q fezerom hos malayos por comselho dos guzarates//. 1 

No gramde E belbjosso Regno de daquem sera noso Recomtamem- 
to apartase Do Reyno de cambay 3 por Junto com maymj ou may & 
do Regno de guoa por cara patanam pola terra firme com EllRey De 
narsimgua E com ho Reino dorixa por huua pomta estreita & da 
bamda de cambaya por cima com as serranjas q estam antre a India 
& delij he este Reino abastado De mamtimemtos terra mujto aprouei- 
tada moor Regno que ho De cambaia De melhor Jemte de gueerra 
naturall da trra he a gemte desta terra Dacanarjm cavaleiros De ssuas 
pesoas E a pijonajem gemte q sofre bem ho trabalho tern este Reino 
muyta Jemte bramq a avera duzemtos & cimquoemta annos que este 
Reino he gam?ado aos Jemtios De Rumes he turqos & parses como o 
Regno de cambaia/ tern mujtas cidades na terra firme he muj tos 
portos no maar// 

Nauegamdo De maym para ho Regno De guoa sam os portos Do 
Reino De daquem hos segujntes / chaull/ damda / matalenj / dabull/ 
sangizara/ earapatanam/ 

As cidades do Reino de daquem seram vinte Das quaees estas sam 
as mais pin?ipaees em Jemte/ bider / visapor/ £idapor/ solapor 
Rachull/ <?agar/ quellberga queher/ bayn/ 

1 At the foot of this page, in the same later hand as the previous notes, is 
written: aquy fenesse 0 pr° i° e atras compepa 0 seg do nos Canaris e baticala 
(Here ends the first book; and the second, about the Kanarese and Bhatkal, 
begins further back). Beneath the last word is a star. * 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


371 


chamase o Rey coltan mahamud xaa Depos ho Rey Jdalhan njza Nome do 
malmulc/ cupall mullc / hodauan / mjliquj dastur estes quoatro se- 
nhores mamdam ho Regno & os q em seus tit os so9edem este Jdalhan senores 
de na$ao he turqo de torquja seu pay foy espauo do pay deste Rey he P in PP aes 
polio achar homem de preco ho fez 9abay 0 / este nome de cabaio he 
nome do siao asy como capitam daguarda do Rey com ha guouernam9a 
Da metade do Regno o que tem tall carg 0 chamase cabay 0 he da 
esem9ia Do Reino oficiall cabayo he mujto gramde sor o que tem 
esta dinjdade e este menjstra o Rey de tudo o que ha mester/ neste 
carguo viueo o pay deste que ora hee// 

foy o cabaio pasado caualeiro muj t0 estimado E dizem que ouue 
quoremta batalhas campaees E que nas trimta foy desbaratado & as 
dez vem9eo morto este ha pouco tempo o filho chamouse Jdallcam 
que qr Dizer capitam Jeerall em todo o Regno E lam90u maao do Rey 
E apousemta o homde o Jdalcan quer E amda como preso comtudo 
qmdo vee o Jdalcam ao coltam mahamud xaa/ algum tamto lhe faz 
cortessia teue este atrevimemto ho ydalham comtra vomtade dos 
quat 0 & do Rey por ter de sua Jurdicam toda a Jemte branq a Do 
Reino pola mor parte por ser estramgeiro & turqo & teer taall ofi9io 
chegaronse os asolldadados a elle Eicerto/ bider/ todas as cidades Do 
Regno pola moor parte sam Da Jurdi9ao do Jdallcan/ emquanto este 
era cabaio eram estoutros senhores tarn validos E omrrados como elle 


Despoijs que se chamou Jadlcan ficarom todos debaixo & por estes 
estarem escamdalizados tem comtinoadamemte guerra como se dira 
adiamte/ os portos do maar Deste Regno sam todos do cabaio ei9epto 
chaull & damda// 

chamase o sor de chaull & damda njza mall mulec seu pay deste era o sor de 
turq 0 de nacam seu espauo Do pai do Rey de daquem E fiquou 
gramde sor & tem mujtos lugares na terra firme tem este mjll homees 
bramcos da persija de peleja mjll de cauallo/ 

Este cupall mulec he gramde sor out ro s lhe chamam cutell mama- l cupall 
luq° he naturall do Reyno De daquem nom foy catiuo he homem De mulec l 
mujto pre9o mujto estimado na terra Dizem que tem este Domees 




372 


TOM II PIRES 


mjlic Eeste mjlic dastur he abixij escpauo DellRey tam homrrado easy 

como cada huu destes he fromteiro com narsingua esta em quelbergua 
tem Jemte de guarnjfam esta cidade ho cabayo lha tomou E ora 
estam de guerra 

hos quatro senhores de cima Juntos em acordo tem de cavallo asy 
dhomees bramcos como Da terra perto de doze athe qujnze mjll 
homees estes sam Juntos comtra ho cabayo ho cabayo que ora he 
J dal can tem out a tanta Jente E tem comtinoadamemte guerra huus 
Fol. 132V. com outros sam os soldos desta terra mores q nenhuus destas | partes 
aas vezes sam mall paguos/ Tem este Regno ajmda mujt os Jemtios 
naturaees da terra E mujtos bramenes estimados todo o Jemtio deste 
Regno qmdo morre he costume se tem molher queimarse por hir dar 
companhija a seu marido homde estiuer se o nom faz fica desomrrada 
nom somemte ella mas seus paremtes todos E as vezes nom tem ellas 
mujta vomtade & os paremtes & os bramjnes as moue a se quejmare 
por tall q seu costume nom se quebre// 

O Regno De daquem he cavaleiroso tera de cavallo trimta mjll de 
pionajem sem comto Jeerall memte neste Reino & no de guoa vinham 
estas Jemtes bramcas a q chamamos Rumes ganhar soldo E omrra. este 
Rey daua nomes como mjliqes .s. fuao mjlic E o de mais homrra he 
han ou can E vinham ganhar estes t°s sam os cans aquy m t0 prezados 
& homrrados digo caees de can nom por anjmaes de gaga he a Jemte 
deste Regno soberba presumtuosa/ ho Rej he dado ao amfiam & as 
molheres njsto pasa seu tpo E o seu Jdalcan nom he menos sera elRey 
de qoremta annos & o Jdalcan de trimta. homees ambos guordos & 
bem gordos que se dam a todo vifio avera no Regno De daque De 
turquos & Rumes & arabios atee Duzemtos de persijanos avera Dez 
ou doze mjll homees De peleja quern neste Reino mais Jemte bramca 
tem mais poderoso he tera cimcoenta alifamtes este Regno/ tem os 
cavallos arabios & persyanos gramde valia/ q se nom podera creer/ / 
Manti- Tem ho Regno de daqem aRoz em gramde auomdanca alguu 


mentos 


triguo Carnes tem mujta arequa & mujto betelle//. 


Trato do Amtiguamemte teue gramde trato primcipall memte dabull era 
!da$em ^ esca ^ a Ri<l ua n °bre E homrrada bom porto de mujtas naoos E vosa 
alteza tratou tam mall a estes portos q ficarom destrujdos E diu se 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


373 


fez de matos gramde com fauor de uosa altez a // tem ajmda gramdes 
mercadores he faz trato nom a decima parte Do que soya eram estes 
portos escala dadem athee elles & delles athee malaq a tratauam todas 
mercadorias e grosas naaos De mujtos mercadores estauam estes no 
meio boos portos terras fartas/ de m ta agoa desembarcauam aqui a 
mo5r parte dos cavallos que Recolhia ho Regno De daque eram estes 
portos Ricos & dos dritos delles era o Rey de daque & o seu cabayo 
& o nazimall mulec De gramde drt° & isto lhe fazija/ daar gramdes 
solldos mas aguora que o capitam Jerall tem mudada esta neguo- 
9 ea?am ao polido Regno De guoa o Reino De daquem nom pode 
mujto durar e sua homrra ho Camjnho estaa aberto pa se perder sem 
Remedio ou guoa pa ser a moor cousa Do mumdo todas estas cousas 
mostra ho tempo amdamdo a Rezam De asy ser vista crara esta sem 
comtradicam/ a q se faziam em dabull gramdes tratos E mujto 
Riquos/ memtado na parte Dassija foy o porto de chaull & dabull. 

Dabull nom foy tamto por Rezam da aguoa que tem solobra// 
soprados amdam os seguidores De mafamede vaise gastamdo o 
Redicall a estes q tanto prosperarom//’ 

Tem este Reino De daquem as mercadorias segujntes/ beirames Merca- 
pannos bramcos & de cores Jmfinjdade beatilhas De que Jerall donas 
memte os mouros & quelijs fazem touquas gram suma que abasta ho 
mumdo Destas duas sortes fazem tambem neste Reino matamunguo 
preto que vail pa diua & pa abixia/ a for?a do betelle que se chama 
folio Jmdo vay daq pa cambaia ormuz adem posto q ho de guoa seja 
mjlhor// nestes portos deste Regno por estar em boa paragem se 
achauam todallas mercadarias dasya & da europa he mujto memtado 
o porto de chaull Ja aguora se vay fynamdo //. 


Aguora se nos faz ho camjnho pllo soberbo Regno de gu5a. chaue Fol. i33r. 
das Jmdias pm a & seg da Diujdese Do rregno De daquem por $ara Regno de 
patanam no maar Rijo majs pincipaall Da Jmdia E da bamda Donor guoa 
por cimtacora/ pola terra firme com ho Regno de daque E com ho 
Regno De narsijmgua a limgoajem que se fala neste Regno he con- 
conjm ffoy o Regno De guoa sempre mujto estimado polla melhor 
cousa q ellRey de narsyng a tinha asij honrrada como proueitosa os 
Do Regno de daque lhe ganharom pte Deste Reyno E despois o 



TOM li PIRES 


Iportos de 
Imaarj 


374 

cabaio velho pay do que oje viue o acabou de ganhar dos Jentios 
avera quoremta & cimq 0 annos este Reino he do cabay 0 & tamto que 
se ajuntou ao Regno De daque foy guoa cabe9a de todo o Regno de 
daque E guoa/ a limgoajem Deste Regno De guoa nom he como a de 
daquem nem como a de narsimgua he sobre sy he a Jemte Deste 
Regno esfor^ada avisada E que sofre gramdemente o trabalho asy 
homees Do maar como Da terra//. 

tern ho Regno de guoa no maar Jumto com carapatanam/ damdri- 
uar / bamda guoa velha/ E noua / aliga / ancoll/ vpale Rijo de sail a 
ponta darrama cimtacora amjadiua/ amtre estes portos ha rrios E 
naaos amtigamemte E aguora navegam E porque estas cousas sam do 
Regno de guoa somemte se dira de gu 5 a Da bamda da terra firme 
tinha cidads E villas mujtas tenadarias de gramdes Remdas E de 
terras muy aproueitadas que Jmda estam em poder de mouros mas 
pois a gram ?idade de guoa que he chaue de tudo he em poder & 
serui90 do muy alto ds o all nom tardara mujto //. 

Asij como as portas sam defemsam das casas asy os portos das 
proujmcias & Regnos sam pa emparo susidio primcipall guarda os 
quaees tornados sojuzgados em gramde agonja sam postos os taees & 
com quail qr Discordija que em sij tenham ou com seus vizinhos 
lloguo se perdem por nom serem socorridos quanto mais q estos 
Regnos nom tinha out a saluacam se nom a 9idade he porto de guoa 
como cousa mais primcipall/ coua de ladroees turquos Rumes E Jemte 
q morre comtra nosa fee era guoa aparelhauase guoa pa gramde perda 
pa os xstaoos E o Juizo de ds mudou a perda a elles que plla tomada 
De guoa nom he duujda a mourama dar gemjdos guoa era lugar 
desposto pa se fazerem ligeira memte as armadas e huu anno dos 
mouros que em suez n 5 se faram em vimte// 

quern duujda que a Jemte no desbarato do Regno de guoaa se 
tomarom nads que os mouros tinham pa comnosquo pelejarem que 
despois forom a bamdan carreguar de ma9as pa nos / a Juizo De noso 
sor he Jncomprensyuell E cada huu atemtamemte Julge que mor 
perda Receberom os mouros por guoa do que pode ser quamdo 
perderem adem guoa nom somemte sopea o Reino de daquem/ mas 
ajmda ho de cambay a tem afoguado / maoo vizinho tern os mouros 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


375 

em guoa. os mouros pola maneira que foro guanhamdo os Regnos hos 
vam perdemdo o Regno sem portos casa he sem portas noso sor he o 
que qr ho perdimemto de mafamede E Joane o espiuao o faz trigoso Ja 
he tempo/ Ja nas bamdas das Jmdias nom fa?a nengue fundameto de 
mouros somemte Dos que andarem a laurar nas serranjas tern ho 
Regno de guoa as Jmdias adrjto ajmda que nom queiram he pulido 
de famosos vergeiis aguoas cousa mais fresca das Jmdias E mais 
abastada esta de mamtimemtos domde se costumou amtre os Rumes 
E Jemtes brancas praticarem vamos ao Regno de guoa gostar das 
sombras E aruoredos E tomar o sabor do do$e betelle/ nom he Duujda 
o Regno de guoa ter betelle mjlhor q em outra parte ssuaue gostoso 
mujto estimado E de guoa Jerall memte se carregua delle pa adem 
ormuz & canbay 3, are?a ou avelana Jmdia tem mais & melhor que 
out 0 luguar/ aRoz aq se carregua & da terra firme de Regnos mujto 
alomgados emtrauam em guoa grades cafilas De bois carregados De 
mercadarias se estas cousas forom no tempo pasado qmta mais Rezam 
sera daq por diamte/ sem duujda q se fara gramde escalla moor Do 
que nunca foy E os mercadores folgaram com nosa Justi9a mais que 
com a q lhe fazem os mouros// 

Ho Regno de guoa numqua Deu a vamtajem a chaull tratava Fol. 133V. 
gramdememte tijnha mujtos mercadores De todas nacoees Jemtes de 
gramdes cabedaees era gramde o trato della sempre tinha mujtas 
naaos tem bom porto & nam somemte ysto mas na neguoce?ao das 
armadas que se nelle faziam era luguar desposto por Rezam da ma- 
deira & dos ofi^aees & por ser mujto abastado mujto forte sempe 
mujto acompanhado de Jemte bramqa chea de soberba E nom sem 
causa por que ho Regno de guoa Jaz no amaguo de todas as Jmdias 
aquj se celebraua gramdes festas ao profano mafamede que sam mu- 
dadas ao nome de Jhuu xpo hee a cidade De guoa tarn forte como 
Rodes tem quatro fortalezas out a s muj Riq a memte obradas polios 
lugares necesarios em dano do nome de mafamede//. 

De todos os Regnos Darabija petrea dormuz da persya do Regno trato. 
de cambay a traziam cavallos a guoa E daquj se espalhauam pa o 
Regno De daque & de narsijmgua amtigamemte/ Despois de guoa ser 
tomada dos mouros avja narsymgua cavallos por baticala E asy 



TOME PIRES 


Jemtios 

deste 

Regno 


376 

Recolhia guoa todallas mercadarias Destas partes Retornauam beira- 
mes biatilhas aRoz arequa betelle he m tos pardaos & oraos porque 
aquj valem os cavallos mujto ha cauallo q vail oitocemtos pardaoos 
moedas De trezemtos trinta cimq 0 Rs cada huua // Recolhia mujtas 
especiarias & mercadorias destas out a s bamdas em camtidade// 

Tinha o Regno De guoa mujtas Naaos q Nauegavam pa mujtas 
partes he as na5s De guoa eram estimadas fauorecidas em todas as 
partes por q ha mourama tinha toda sua fortaleza nestas partes em ho 
Reino de guoa a gemte q navegava he naturall da terra os Do maar 
porque ho Regno de guoa tern boa Jemte de maar que sostem o tra- 
balho asy que nauegamdo os de guoa em outs 0 lugares E os das outs a 
partes em guoa era seu trato gramde domde se Recolhiam gramdes 
Remdas dos drrtos Das mercadorias das amqorajes & dos drrtos da 
terra das tenadarias eu ouuj mujtas vezes dizer q guoa com seu termo 
asy dos drrtos de tudo o que vem a ella como de seu naturall Remdia 
cada huu anno quoat 0 cemtos mjll pardaoSs E segumdo suas cousas 
parece ser asy//. 

Neste Regno de guoa ha mujtos Jemtios mais q no Regno De 
daquem delles muj homrrados & de gramdes fazemdas E na mao 
destes Jazem todo o Regno easy/ porque sam naturaees E tern as terras 
& acodem com as Remdas sam Delles homees fidallguos de gramdes 
Jemtes & terras suas p as mujto estimados viuem em suas posifoes 
cousas mujto alegres & vicosos Riqos hos Jemtios Do Regno De 
guoa sam mais validos q hos do Regno de cambay a tern fermosos 
templlos seus neste Regno tern sacerdotes ou bramjnes de muj tas 
maneiras ha amtre estes bramjnes gerafooes mujto homrrados delles 
n5 comem cousa q tiuese samgue nem cousa feita por maao doutre 
sam estes bramjnes em toda a terra acatados moor memte amtre 
Jemtios servem De levar mercadorias E cartas segura memte pola 
terra como os De Cambaya os pobres que os Riquos tern primjnencia 
de gramdes s res sam agudos avisados letrados em sua creemfa nom 
se fara huu bramjne mouro que ho facam Rey // 

As Jemtes do Regno de guoa por nenhuu tormemto comfesam 
cousa q fa9am sofrem gramdememte so em ser atormemtados de 
diuersos tormemtos amte morrem que comfesarem o que Detremjnam 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


377 


de calar E as gemtis molheres de guoa sam geitosas no vestir / as q 
dan?am & volteam o fazem com melhor maneira que todas as 
destas partes//. 

custumase gramdememte neste Regno de guoa, toda molher de Fol. 134 r. 
Jemtio queimarse por morte de seu marido amtre sy tem todos ysto 
em pre?o & os paremtes della fiqua desomrrados quamdo se nom 
querem queimar & elles com amoestacoes as fazem quelmar nas q de 
maa memte Recebem o sacrefigio E as q de todo pomto se nom quei- 
mam fiqua pubricas fornjcarias E ganham pa as despesas & fabricas 
dos templlos Domde sam freigesses he nisto morrem estes gemtios 
tem cada huu huua molher por hordenanca mujtos bramenes pro- 
metem Castidade & sostenna sempre/ / 

Nos out°s portos do Regno De guoa se carrega muj t0 aRoz sail 
betelle areq a em que trata cada huu Destes Rios tem povoa9oees 
aRedadas daguoa com temor/ os q Destes sam seguros nauegam os 
que nam perdemse. estam Da ma 5 o do cabay° com capitaees q 
Recolhem as Remdas da terra & delies com Jemte De guarnjcam de 
cavalo por que tem comtinoadamemte guerra com as terras da pro- 
vincia de narsymgua//. 


hos bemgalas sam mercadores de gramdes fazemdas homees que bemgalas 

nauegam em Jumcos viuem em bemgala gramde numero De parses S ^ mdes 

Rumes turqos arabios mercadores de chaull E dabull he de guoa a merca- 

terra he muiito abastada de muitos mamtimemtos De carnes pescados dore$ E 

mujto 

arrozes triguo barato ho Rey dela he mouro homem de peleja tem soltos 

gramde nome antre hos mouros/ ha Jete que tem a gouVrnam9a do emsinados 

na merca - 

Reyno sam abixijs estes sam avidos por cavaleiros sam muj t0 estima- daria sam 
dos os Rex seruense em suas Camaras Defies sam estes pincipaees homees 
capados estees taees vem a ser Reis E gramdes bres no Regno os que os merca _ 
nom sam capados sam homees da guerra a esta nacam hobede9e o dores sam 
Regno por medo despois do Rey em bemgala se custuma os capados ^ ^ 
mais que em outra parte do mundo he gramde parte Defies capados/ 
os bemgalas pola maior parte sam homees pretos nedeos Jemtis jj^j ane ^ 
homees agudos mais que todas as na9oes sabidas & ra do 

ha aguora setemta E quoatro annos que em bemgalla se vsa ho s0 ( e di- ^ 
costume de pa9§e que quern quer que mata o Rey fica Rey tem E Regno / / . 



TOME PIRES 


Estado do 
Rey. 


Reis 
tribu- 
taries ao 
Rey de 
bemgala. 


[este 

tipura 

temj 

mujto 

algodanij 

Jmfimdol. 

Fol. I34v. 


378 

creem que nenhuu nam pode matar o Rey sem consemtimemto de ds 
E aquelle fica por Rey E desta maneira Duram hos Reis muj t0 pouco. 
Reynam sempre Deste tempo atheora. abixijs hos que sam gramdes 
pryvados do Rey asij se faz ysto que o Reyno nom Recebe aluoro90 
hos mercadores viuem asoseguada mamte he Ja custume/ Damtes 
nom se fazija asy mas era de pay a filho tomarom este Custume de 
pa£ee & sosteno gramdememte//. 

Ho Rey de bemgala he poderoso tern muj ta Jemte De eauallo/ tera 
em seu Regno cem mjll homes de eauallo peleja com Reis gemtios 
gramdes senhores E moores que elle mas ho Rey de bemgalla por 
caussa de ser mais ehegado Ao maar tem mais eixe^igio De guerra he 
pervalece sobre elles he mujto dado aas armas he mujto Mouro De 
vomtade ha trezemtos annos que os Reis deste Regno se tornarom 
mouros he terra mujto Riqua // 

Comfijna EllRey Dorixa com bemgalla Da bamda De choromam- 
dell. he gramde rrey este he he seu trebutario Este tem mujtos ali- 
famtes he he Rey primcipall he Riq° desta terra sam os boos Dia- 
mamtes //. 

Comfyna Da bamda de peguu com bemgalla Ra?am este tem 
muj tos cavallos he he guerreiro e esta sempre com elle em guerra E 
este he tambem trebutarjo ao dito Rey De bemgalla// 

EllRRey de coos he Jemtio Dizem que tera setemta mjll homees 
De cavallo & tambem he trebutario a elle/ Este Regno De cous tem 
mujta pimemta & mujta seda he amfiam/ / 

EllRey De tipura tambem he Jemtio no sertao E trebutario seu este 
he de muj tos alifates E sor De todos estes quatro Reis sam gramdes 
Sres seus vasallos nos Regnos destes se fazem as cousas Ricas que ha 
em bemgalla E porque nom podem viuer sem ho maar obede5enlhe 
por causa De dar saida a suas mercadorias aguora avera tres annos q 
sam aleuamtados comtra bemgala tem gramde guerra E nom lhe 
obede9em //. 

tem guerra EllRRey de bemgala sempre com 0 Rey de dely E 
pelejam os capitaees & Jemte De huu E Doutro sempre o Rey De 
dely he mujto mor senhor que ho Rey De bemgalla mas esta afastado 
De bemgalla por Jornada De quinze dias E o camjnho nom tem muy ta 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


379 


aguoa E por esta causa nam he obidiemte o dito Rey De bemgalla ao 
dito xaqedarxa Rey De delij Este Rey he Jemtio gramde Sor E mujto 
temjdo De gramdisymo mimero De cauallos alifamtes & de Jemte// 

Ho primcipall porto he o da cidade de bemgalla Domde ho Regno portos De 
tem ho nome vam e dous Dias Da foz polio Rijo a gidade E dizem que ^ >emga ^ a 
no majs baixo De maree vazija tem tres bragas a cidade sera de co- 
remta mjll vezinhos o Rey tem seu asemto nesta cydade sam casas 
Dola todas somemte ha do Rey he De adobes bem obrada este Rijo 
he o ganjes Dizem os bemgallas q vem do geo/ 

Ho outro porto he sadegam comtra orixa he bom porto tem boa foz 
he boa cidade Riqua homde ha mujtos mercadores sera de dez mjll 
vizinhos estas sam as primgipaees cidades De bemgalla De merca- 
dores na terra firme ha out a s mas he cousa pequena he muj t0 forte 
E de Jemte De guerra E do sertaoo comtinoadamemte tem guerra// 
orixa que he no Regno Dorixa he porto da cidade dorixa esta 
Junto com ho maar 

cultarey aijamom / paleacate/ naaor / nagapatam do gramde E 
nomeado turucoll De narsijmgua/ tudo ysto sam portos na bonua 
qlim terra De narsymgua/ / 

Vem De bemgalla a malaca cadano huu Junco E dous as vezes vail 
cada huu oitenta nouemta mjll cz dos trazem Roupa branca fyna syna- 
bafos de sete sortes chautares De tres sortes beatilhas beijrames panos 
outs 0 Ricos trara atee vimte sortes Delles trazem ago Riquysymos 
ge5s De camas Dantretalhos De todas cores E muj t0 fermosos paredes 


De casas como panos Darmar E asy mesmo comservas Dacuqr de 
diuersas maneiras Em mujta abastamga todos os mjrabulanos em pfaue- 
comserua gengiures laranjas pepinos cenoyras Raboos limoees azam- 8 am estes 
boas figuos aboboras combalengas E outs a mujtas fruitas & destas ma ? aq 
tambem em vinagre trazem mujta copia De vasos De barro pardo pafee 
mujto cheirosos q se estimam mujto nestas ptes & valem baratos //. quatro 
A Roupa de bengala vail muj t0 em malaca por q he da valia de todo naaos & 
leuamte pagam em malaca sejs por gemto sam pesoas q sabem mujto J un ^ os ^ 
na mercadoria E Daquj De malaqa empregam todo seu dr° E outro q aguora 


tomam em Retorno pa bengala em que fazem mujto proueito o que 
em pacee nom podem fazer somemte pimemta E seda// 


ajmda 

gramde- 

memtej 



TOME PIRES 


Retorno 
de malaca 
pa 

bemgala. 

Drrtos 
que se 
paguam 
em bem- 
galla. 

Fol. I35r. 

Tempo 
Da mon- 
pao & 


jMoeda 
de bem- 
gala por 
homde/ 
se faz a 
merca- 
d aria l 


Homde 
valem 
& correm 
estes 
buzeos 
p° moedaj 


380 

A primgipall mercadaria q leuam pa bemgala he camfora de burney 
& pym ta Destas duas gramde copia crauo ma9as noz mozcada sam- 
dallos seda aljofar gramde soma por9elanas bramcas mujtas cobre 
estanho chubo azougue porcelanas gramdes Vrdes dos leqos amfiam 
dadem he alguu pouco De bemgala Damasquos bramcos & Vrdes 
emRolados da chyna barretes De graa alcatifas valem crises & espadas 
Da Jaoa //• 

Todo mercador q vay a bemgala ha De paguar De oito tres he este 
drrto asy Desordenado acham que he bom por causa que estas mer- 
cadorias valem tanto na terra E o Retorno he em cousas De tamta 
valija E de tam pouquo balume q afirmam com huu se ganham Dous 
& meio & tres vemdida a mercadoria a saluamt 0 / 

partem daqij na emtrada dagosto he em trimta dias sam em bem- 
galla estam 11a fazemdo mercadoria partem de laa ao pmeiro de feuer r0 
E poem out r0 tanto ate malaq a // quamdo querem Desomrrar huu 
home chamamlhe bemgalla sam gramdes tredores sam mujto agudos 
em malaq a ha gramde numero De bemgallas homees E molheres sam 
homees Pescadores & oficiaes alfaiates os mais Delles he alguus tra- 
balhadores mujto ma5os De trabalho//: 

Em bemgala vail mais ho ouro a sejsta parte que em malaq a E a 
prata he mais barata em bengala que em malaqa a qujmta parte E as 
vezes a quarta parte a moeda da prata chamase tanqat pesa meio taell 
que sam easy seis oytavas vail esta moeda em malaq a vymte calaijs 
vail em bemgala sete cahon cada cahon vail dezaseis pon cada pon vail 
oitemta buzeos De maneira q cada cahon vail mjll ij e & oitemta 
buzeos E vail cada tancat oito mjll E nouecemtos & setemta buzeos 
sae ao calaim quoatrocemtos & coremta & oyto q he pre?o por que 
dam huua g a boa E por isto se podera sabr o que podera compar p° 
elles chamanse os buzeos em bemgala cury//- 

Hos buzeos correm por moeda em orixa e em todo o Regno de 
bemgalla he em Raqa he em martamane porto do Regno De peguu 
hos buzeos De bemgala sam maiores com huua beta amarela polio 
meio estes valem em todo bemgalla E tomanos em graDe camtidade 
de mercadorias asy como ouro e em orixa nom valem estes em out a 
parte E sam mujto prezados nestes dous lugares / Dos de peguu E 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


381 


Racam se dira qndo se dos lugares falar vem estes estolhidos Das 
Jlhas de diua em muyta catidade/ 

Ho pesso De bemgalla chamase dalaa he bra?o de pao sem comghas 
& nas pomtas atam a mercadoria E asy se faz E com hos mercadores se 
leuaes peso lamcam lhe a comta E fazes pre?o por elle E fazes vosa 
mercadoria Dizem q dez ou doze p as leuam hos drrtos cada huu o seu 
que sam ofi?iaees Diso E que ao Dizimar fazem agrauo aos merca- 
dores E tiranjas gramdes/ / 

Dizem os mercadores bemgalas q este Rey De bemgalla que se 
chama 9oltam v^em xaa que nom he benjuollo aos mercadores E que 
sse ssaem mujtos pa outs a partes/ tern este Rey De suas mamcebas 
vijmte & quoatro fs° machos he muj tas f a s // ‘ 

Ho Regno Derracam he amtre bemgala he peguu he Rey Jemtio 
muj to poderoso no sertao tern no maar huu porto bom homde tratam 
hos peguus & bemgalas E quelijs nom de mujto trato chamase o porto 
mayajerij Jumto com este porto tern o Rey huua fortaleza De adobes 
forte amtre elles// 

Na terra De Raquam ha muj ta Jemte De cauallo & muj tos alifamtes 
ha alguua prata. ha tres ou quoatro sortes de pannos Dalguodam De 
que vestem os comarquaaos sam panos De suas guisas E trajos E alij 
os ha mais q em out a s ptes & vem alij p° elles// 

Comfyna o Regno De rraqua no sertam lomje com a serra gramde 
q se chama capelamguam homde ha mujtas pouoaijoes de gemte nom 
mujto domestiq a estes trazem os almjzqueres he Rubijs a gramde 
cidade Dava q he a pimcipall cousa do Regno De Racam & daly vem 
teer a peguu & de peguu se espalham | pa bemgalla Narsijmgua E pa 
pa<pee he malaq a Deste capelamgua he a mjna Dos Ditos Rubijs os 
melhores que ha nestas partes ho almjzqr he dalymarias como cabras 
esfolam as E a carne pisada com ho samgue fazem Do coiro hos bisalhos 
a que chamamos papos e esta he a Vrdade Do almjzqr he nom Da 
postemas E se os olhardes bem mujtos achares ajmda com hos osos// 
A moeda Desta terra he caija q qr dizer fruseleira em pedagos asy 
como se dira Della em peeguu qmdo se Delle falar E tambem buzeos 
bramcos como os De peguu he Regno muj t0 abastado De cames 
aRozes E cousas de seu comer//: 


IManeira 
Do peso j 


Reyno de 
Racao 


Domde 
vem ho 
almjzqr 
& Rubis 
fijnosll 

Fol. 135V. 


jcorre 

neste 

Regno 

buziosj 



tom£ pires 


Ipeguuj 


Merca- 
darias q 
vem de 
peguu a 
malaq a E 
a paape/l 


llos 

Drrtos q 
paguam 
em 

malaq a l 

Retorno 
De malaq' 
pa peguu j 


Drrtos q 
paguam 
em peguu j 


382 

Peeguu he Regno De Jemtios he terra mais farta que todas as q 
temos vistas he sabidas/ he mais farta que syao easy tamto como a 
Jaoa tem no mar tres Portos com tres guouernadores que na limguo- 
ajem Da terra se chama Guouemador toledam ho porto mais chegado 
a terra he Racam he copymy este tem ho trato Da bamda de bemgalla 
he bonua qlim ho out 10 he dogo este he porto gramde De gramde 
gidade & de mujtos mercadores he o toleda Dele he mayor que hos 
out°s neste porto se fazem hos Jumcos por caso Da madeira mujta & 
boa que tem / ho outro porto he apartado De martamane homde vame 
hos De malaq a & os de pagee e tambem he boa cidade gramde de 
mercadores a Jemte baixa Deste Regno he em sua terra trauesa fora 
sam mamsos boos trabalhadores Jemte symprez // 

Ho primcipall he aRoz vimram cadano a estes dous lugares he a 
peedir qnze Dezaseis Jumcos vimte trimta pamgajauas De cargua 
como navijos trazem mujto lacar E beyjoym almjzqr pedras Rubijs 
prata manteyguas azeytes sail gebollas alhos mostarda (?) & cousas a 
estas semelhantes De comer partem em feuer ro vem em margo na 
fym & p todo abrill sam homees q vemdem sua mercadaria mansa 
memte a guisa da terra apega sete oyto mercadores a mercadoria por 
yso estam & vemdenna// 

Todo mamtimemto nom pagua nenhuu Drrto em malaq a nem em 
pagee som te presemte a sua cortesya segumdo a terra estaa em 
costume Do all pagam Seis por gemto he gramde ho ganho De peguu 
a malaq a no aRoz & no laqa E em tudo ho all// 

He a primcipall cousa porcelanas baixas de sortees E de lauores 
Vmelhos / azoug e muyto / cobre/ vermelhao Damascos emRolados 
escuros De frores que vem logo de china pa elles po que pa outrem 
nom seruem estanho Jmfimdo fruselexra em pedacos qebrados E 
saaos ysto sobretudo que he moeda he porcelanas De sortes levam 
Jmfimdas aljofar pouquo ouro // empegam todo seu Dr° E mais se o 
teuesem nisto / crauo pouquo noz moscada magas pouq a cousa partem 
Daq ao primeiro De Julho & vam a pagee carreguar De p ta e em 
agt° yam a martamane// 

Hos Drrtos que pagam em peguu hos ditos mercadores sam doze 
por cemto he Disto nom qujtam nada se aves De falar com ho guo- 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


uernador aves de leuar psemte E asy he o costume De malaq a 
segumdo a causa asy aves de peitar. ho porto De martamane he 
priguoso tem pilotos da barra que se obrigam metervos dent r0 a 
saluamemto pagamdolhes seg° costume da terra nam entra nas agoas 
cre^idas nem mortas tomanlhe meyo temp 0 pa seguramca //. 

A moeda de peguu p 5 homde se faz a mercadoria he freseleira que 
se chama can9a desta frusel ra huua he melhor E outra somenos a 
fruseleira De cobre e estanho he melhor a de cobre estanho E chumbo 
a peor/ De cobre he chumbo a can^a De martamane he a melhor esta 
pasa por toda ha terra a dez calaljs tres aRates he cimquo hom9as a 
vi9a que he cate & m° Da Romaa gramde de malaq a Estes sam Do 
peso nouo E a out a vail mends vail ho calaim homze Rs E quat ro 
ceitijs a Rezam De 9em calajs por tres cz dos // 

Vail a Vi9a da dita cam9a dez calajs emtam Dizes qmtas Vi9as de 
tall mercadorja me Dares pola vi9a da can9a ou qmtas vi9as De 
cam9a queres pola vica de tall mercadoria E cada vica destas tem 
9em tiquas estas 9em tiquas valem tamto como huua wi^af / 

A prata he em aRuellas marquadas Da marq a de syam porque Dela 
vem toda chama se o peda90 na aRuella caturna ho peso Della he huu 
taell E meio que sam duas on9as E huua oytaua E huu quarto vail em 
peguu quoat ro vi9as E m a E aqem malaq a vail huu taell De tijmas 
que sam sesemta E quoat ro calaijs ho ouro tem a valija em peguu q 
vail em malaq a levase gramde camtidade De prata a bemgalla De 
peguu la vail mais alguuacousa//. 

A moeda pequena De peguu sam buzeos pequenos bramquos 
Jeerall memte valem em martamane^qinze mjll huua vi9a que sam 
Dez calajs/ quamdo sam baratos dezaseis mjll quamdo sam mujto 
cards quatorzemjll he geerall qinze mjll vail ho calaim mjll E qujn- 
hemtos / por quoatrocemtos & qinhemtos Dam huua galynha he por 
este pre90 as cousas semelhamtes a estas/ se em peguu nom correm os 
ditos buzios senam em martamane E por esta maneira correm em 
Racam vem os buzeos das Jlhas de diva Domde fazem as toalhas em 
gramde copija & asy vem das Jlhas de baganga & de bumey E traze- 
nos a malaca E daquj vam a peguu// 

Ho dachim De martamane Do bahar he menos q ho de malaq a 


Moeda 

meuda 



TOM IS PIRES 


Naaos 
guza- 
ratas a 
peguu 


jRey & 
pesoas 
princi- 
ples/ 


Vsso dos 
S res & 
out a 
Jemte 

Fol. 136V. 


A Man- 
eira dos 
corpos he 
vistidos 
dos pe- 
guus & de 
suas 
mothers 

As mo- 
ther es sam 
mais 
brancasj 


384 

vijmte cates ho de martamane tem cemto & vimte vi^as que sam 
cemto E oitemta cates E o de malaqa tem duzemtos E estes cates sam 
Da Romaa gramde// Ho aRoz he por toos tem cada tom Dez guamtas 
Das De malaca afiladas Da terra/: 

Vem cadano huua naao das naoos do guzarate ao porto de marta- 
mane & de dogud trazem Destas mercadarias cobre Vrmelham azou- 
gue anfiam panos E leuam grade camtidade De lacar/. que vail barato na 
terra aas vezes a quoat ro vi5as o bahar as vezes a cimq° E seis & a sete 
E leuam beijoim pta pedras & tornanse & as vezes se pdem na barra //. 

Ho Rey estaa sempre dasemto na £idade de peeguu que he o ser- 
taao & da cidade ao porto De dagam he amdadura de huu dia E huua 
noite E a martamane quoat ro dias E a coximjm oito Dias/ Depos 0 
Rey em valija he o braja que he seu capita & g dor do Reyno E despois 
ho toledam de dogom E depois ho de martamane & loguo ho de xoij 
tem gramde copea Dalifamtes tera sejs ou sete mjll no rregno todo/ 
todo peeguu fidallguo E outra Jemte segumdo he Riq a trazem em 
sua natur a casquavees os S res trazem atee noue Douro De fremosos 
toos De tipres & cont ras tenores Do tamanho Dameixeas alvares De 
nosa terra E asy os q no | podem Douro E de prata por pobres 
trazem de chumbo & de fruseleira. E os douro he pta soam mujto 
mais q estoutros de chumbo & fruseleira//. 

Hos peguus sam homees De meaaos corpos sam sobre ho groso 
parrados & boos trabalhadores De gramde forca amdam sempre 
trosqujados darredor solapados ha mea cabega e emcima mais 
cre^idos hos cabellos Do betelle trazem sempre os demtes negros 
trazem sobre as coxas gramde copea De pano bramquo E na cabeca 
panos bramcos a fei^am De mjtra easy// 

As molheres sam mais bramcas q elles sam asy mesmo Dos corpos 
delies sam fremosas mais Desemuoltas trazem o cabello a guisa da 
chijna como se dira na descricam dachijna as nosas malayas folguam 
mujto com a vimda dos peguus a tra E sam mujto afei^oadas a elles a 
causa disto sera sua Doye armonja/ certo delas sam muj t0 estimados 
E nom sem causa / he esta Jemte mansa De boa vemtur a aquj em 
malaca em sua terra Dizem q he soberba.//. 

pois himdo pa malaca seg° a ordem deste liu ro se atrauesa syam no 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 385 

camjnho Reza hee q delle se digua posto que da bamda da china 
ajmda out® vez o emcomtremos no Rijo Dodiaa //. 

No Regno de siam Da bamda de peguu tem tres portos E da bamda Regno 
de paao & champaa ten mujtos todos sam do dito Regno E da i * aw * 
obidiem5ia Do Rey De syam a terra De siam he gramde E mujto portosl/. 1 
farta De mujta Jemte he cidades De mujtos S res he de muj tos mer- 
cadores Estramjeiros E a mor parte Destramjeiros sam chijs porque 
o trato De syam he gramde na chyna/ a terra De malaca se chama 
terra De syam E toda a de Siam champa E hy se chama da chyna/ / 

He o Regno de sijam Jemtio a Jemte he easy a limguoajem tem 
semelham9a da de peeguu he avida por Jemte avisada E de boom 
comselho os mercadores sam mujto esynados na mercadaria sam 
homees gramdes ba90s Da trosquja De peeguu ho Regno se Rege em 
Justifa o Rey estaa sempe Dasemto na cidade Dodiaa he ca£ador aos 
estramjeiros faz gramde estado aos naturaes he mais comuersauell 
tem mujtas moheres De qujnhemtas pa cima elle tem Rey por morte 
a p® Do samgue pincipalm te sobrinho f° De Jrmaa se he pa iso E se 
nom p vezes hacordos & Juntamemtos de que sera melhor/ guardase 
gramdememte amtre elle ho secreto sam no que lhe conpre homees 
Calados falam com modestia bem emsynada hos momrrados tem 
grande obediemcia ao Rey Cumpem gramde memte seus embaixa- 
dores ho Recado/ / : 

Aos Mercadores estramjeiros q vao a sua terra E Regno com soti- 
lezas lhe fica ha mecadaria na terra E maall paguos E Jsto a todos E 
menos aos chijs pola amjzade que com ho Rey Dos chijs tem E por 
esta causa nom vam a seu porto tamtos como Jria comtudo pola terra 
ser Riq® e boas mercadarias soportam alguuas cousas por Reza Do 
ganho como mujtas vezes se acomte?e aos mercadores p° q dout® 
maneira nom seria mercadarija// 

Em syam ha muj * 0 poucos mouros nom lhes querem os syames 
bem comtudo ha arabios parses bemgallas mujtos qujlijs chijs E 
doutras na9oees he todo seu trato de syam he da bamda Da chijna he 
em pa5ee pedijr & bemgalla nos portos do mar ha os mouros Estam a 

1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘ Siam Royaume de Siam et 
ses Ports.’ 


L 


H.C.S. II. 



TOMIi PIRES 


386 


obidiemgia Dos senhores seus/ E fazem guerra sempre aos syames 
ora no sertao ora pahao he Jemte De guerra nom mujto guerreiros // 
sam os ditos syames De casquavees como hos peeguus E nom menos 
nada senom qmto os S res trazem alem Dos cascavees Diamantes de 
pomtas E out a s pedras Ricas em suas naturas seg° a p a ou fazemda asy 
traz a pedra//. 


Fol. i37r. 

Dereitos 
E moedas 
De siam. 


Pagam os mercadores estramjeiros em siam De noue dous E os 
chijs de doze dous ho bahaar he do peso Da china nem mais nem 
menos ho cate De syam Do ouro E da prata tern huu cate & meyo De 
malaq a corre por moeda meuda em toda a terra buzeos Dos que corre 


em peguu E nas grosas ouro E prata vallem estas moedas ho prego que 
se dise em peguu. E da saida das mercadorias pagam De qnze huu 
nom parega duujda porq a Vrdade hee que pagua de tudo e syam de 


portos dez dous drrtos 


De syam 
jfmdo pa 
malaq a 
Da bamda 
de peguu 


Ho mais perto a terra De peguu a martamane he tenagarj E despois 
ho Juncalom & despois terram E quedaa E e porto Do Reino De 
queeda que trebutarjo a elle E de quedaa atee malaq a tudo sam lu- 


gares Destanho como Ja hee Dito no Regno E termo De malaqua//. 

^RegitoDe Comecamdo De pahaao/ E talimgano/ clam/ tarn say/ patane/ 

syam da lugor / martara/ callnansey/ bamcha/ cotinuo (?)/ peperim/ pamgoray/ 

bamda da tudo sam portos de senhores Da terra De syam he destes sam Reis 
chyna ys- 

to ouuera todos tern Jumcos nom Do Rey de syam sam dos mercadores E Sres 
de seram- dos lugares & depos estes portos esta o Rijo de odia Domde vam a 
la r q a p a cidade Rijo homde emtram naaos & navios larguo & fremoso //. 

qedaa he Regno muj t0 pequeno De pouca Jemte & poucas casas hee 
por huu Rijo demtro ha nelle pymemta cadano obra De quoatrogem- 


leuar 

hordem 


Rijo de tos bahares esta pimemta vay polla vya de siam a china com a que 
quedaa/ tambem traze De pacee E pedir quamdo alguua nao vem a tenacaij E 
aos portos De syam vem a quedaa vemder tambem sua mercadaria E 
os dos lugares Do estanho compram & leuam ouro por que quedaa he 
terra De trato & polla terra vam em tres quoat 0 Dias a terra De syam 


& leuam De queda as mercadarias a syam// 

Este Regno De quedaa comfyna De huua bamda com terrao easy & 
da out a com ho termo Do Regno De malaca & com baruaz trata 
quedaa com pagee/ & pedir/ & os de pacee & pedir vem a quedaa 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


387 


cadano/ vem do guzarate huua nao aos portos de Syam E vem a 
quedaa E carrega De pimemta Da que ha na terra & daly torna aas 
vezes a pagee E a peedir acabar De tomar sua cargua/ & de baruaz 
galamgor & mjmjam leua ho estanho/ / : 

qeda he da obidiemgia DellRey de syam & polio Rijo De queda 
vam a siam tem quedaa aRoz em camtidade pimemta enqeda se gasta 
mujta mereadaria Da chijna & quedaa nom tem Juncos tem lamcharas 
he terra pequena tem bom trato por Rezam dos termos vail em queda 
a Roup a q vail em malaq a /: 

Aguora nos pasaremos a bamda De siam pola parte da china E 
acabado falar De siam dalguus portos seus etam emtraremos ao 
Regno De camboja// 

Mercadorias q ha em siam q vinham a malaq a no tempo que tra- 
taua com ella //. 

Ha em siam aRoz em mujta camtidade & mujto sail peixe seq° manti- 
salgado oraquas legumes & disto vinha a malaq a atee vimte trimta metos 
Juncos cadano//. 

Vem De syam lacar beijoy brasill chumbo estanho prata ouro merca- 
marfill cana fistola trazem vasos de cobre & ouro fumdido anees De 


Rubijs & diamamtes traze gramde copia De panos baixos syames De 
pouco prego pa a Jemte proue & 

Dizem que a pincipall mercadoria que leuam de malaq a pa syam Merca- 

camtidade samdollos brancos dar * as P e 

malaq u ‘ 

pymemta azougue vermelham amfiam azernefe crauo magas noz pasyant 
synabafos gramdes & pequenos he panos quelijs ao custume De siam ^ 
chamallotes aguoa Rosada alcatifas brocados De cambaya caurijs 
bramqos gera camfora De burney pucho sam Rayzes como Ruy 
pomtuo sequo gualhas E asy vallem as mercadorias Da china q dela 
trazem cadano/ / 

Haa vimte E dous annos que os syamees nam tratam em malaq a qmto 
ouuerom deferenga p° que os Reis De malaq a tinham obidiemgia aos t £^° s a 
Rex de syam porq malaq a dize q he da terra De syam Dizem que he syames 
sua E que avera vimte & dous annos q este Rey q perdeo malaca se a 
a leu am ton com esta obidiemgia/ Dizem tambem que pahao se aleu- malaca/l 
amtou comt a syam pola mesma man ra & q os Reis De malaca fauore- 


sam espauos he Espauas/ que leuam em 



tom£ pires 


l/Homde 
tratam 
aguora os 
syames/l 


Rey & 
S res do 
Regnuo 
Desyam 


388 

ciam os De pahao polio paremtesco q ha amtre elles cont a os Syames 
& que tambem esta foy a causa De seu Descom^erto // 

Dizem que tambem foy sobre os lugares do estanho q estam Da 
bamda de qdaa que amtigamemte obidiciam a quedaa E que malaqa 
q hos tomou & por estas cousas todas quebrarom E a pincipall Dizem 
q foy polo aleuantamemto da obidiem?ia Despois Disto os syames 
armarom sobre malaq a E os syames forom destroydos polos malayos 
E que foy capitam lasamane De que fiquou Daquelle tempo ateguora 
Em gramde honrra / / 

Hos syames tratam na china cadano seis sete Juncos tratam com 
9 umda & palimbaao & outs a Jlhas tratam com camboja & champar & 
cau^hy &na terra firme com brema & Jamgoma quando estam em paz// 
trata asy mesmo syam Da bamda De tena^arij com pacee/ pedir / 
com qedaa com peguu com bengalla & os guzarates vem a seu porto 
cadano trata Ricamente pa fora & liberall memte em a terra mas sam 
tiranos grandememte// 

Ho Rey pchayoa quer dizer s5r de todos he despois do Rey o aja 
capemtit he o viso Rey Da bamda De peguu & camboja E faz guerra 
a bremaa & Jamgomaa este aja capetit tern mujta Jemte De peleja 
De seu lijmjte esta terra hee como Rey Della//: 

Ho segumdo he o viso Rey De loguor chamase poyohya (?) este 
guouemador he de paao atee oDiaa/ paham/ talimgano/ chantansay/ 
patane/ lugoumai/ taram calnasey banq a chotomuj pepory pamgoray 
E outs 0 portos que cada huu tern senhores como Reis Delles mouros 
Delles Jemtios e em cada porto ha Juncos mujtos & estes navegam 
com camboja champaa cauchy & com Ja5a & ?umda E com malaq a 
pa^ee pedir & com os Dandarguerij palimbao &/ 

E destes lugares a patane tern pimemta cadano atee setecemtos 
oyto cemtos bahares & cada huu destes portos sam pincipaees & tem 
mujto trato & mujtos se Reuelam comtra syam E este viso Rey he 
mujto Riq° & pesoa mujto homrrado quasy como 0 out 0 capemtit // 

Ho outro he vya chacotay este he viso Rey Da bamda de tenecary 
terrao & qedaa he p a pincipall tem a Jurdicam sobre todos he capitam 
perpeto de tena^ary he s5r de muyta gemte & de terra avomdosa De 
mamtimemtos/ 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


3 % 

E outro he o paraa he sacretario do dito Rey todas as cousas pasam 
por este & polio comqusa q he tesoureiro & dizem que aguora com o 
Rey de syam este para & o comqusa sam | De gramde autoridade Fol. i38r. 
ambos posto que o comcusa he homem de baixa comd^am he De 
maneira no Regno De syam que tudo pasa por estas Duas pesbas/ 
paraa/ & concusa e estes dous espeuerom a malaq a com elRey De 


syam 

Ho Regno de brema comfyna Da bamda do sertaao Da parte De Reyno De 

1 ej 

peguu & Racam tern seus termos/ & da bamda Da chyna com Jamgo- y^ a 
ma & J amgoma comfyna com brema he com cambo J a goma / 1 1 

Estes dous Reis Jemtios do sertaao tern guerra com peguu & com 
Raqa & com bemgala & com cambo Ja primcipal memte com syam por 
que lhe matou certos fs° a estes// outs 0 comtam que somemte brema 
toma os termos de peguu atee camboja no sertaao he Detras Deste 
Reyno dos edetrias he Jam gomaa emtam etra em a terra Da china E 
por que vem estreitamdo a terra nom ha duujda asy ser// 

Em bremaa Dizem ser a mjna Da pedraria que dalij vay a ?idade Merca- 
de aua que he e Racam & que tern mujto beyjoym & lacar & que dalij 
vem ter a syam & a peguu & o almjzqr vem Do Regno De Jaam guo- Regnos 
maa & do Reyno dos [blank] & que Daly vay tambem almjzqr a 
chyna// 

Afirmam & parece Rezam que por via De peguu & syam pola terra 
firme hijr teer ha p ta & samdallos a chyna na bamda Do sertao da 
chyna porque os peguus & syames tratam com brema em lamcharas 


& paraos por Rijos que ha nos ditos Reynos he os mercadores q asy 
vam Dizem o que quere/ & dalij a huu mes toma/. 

Pymemta samdallos bramqos synabafos gramdes peqnos azougue Merca- 
Vmelham Damasquos cetijs brocados Roupa branca De bemgalla & dor ^ ® 
desta Jemte Destes Regnos ha mujtos homees em syam peguu nestes 


camboja//. Regnos 

Sam os homees Destes Regnos cavaleiros tern eavallos alifamtes & j am . 


trazem botas te por costume cortarem os narizes a todo catiuo & soma 


pincipallmemte aos de camboja q prymeiro ysto vsou //. 


1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘(Jangoma) Royaumes de 
Brema et Jamgoma.’ 



39 ° 


TOM ^ PIRES 


Regno De 
Cam- 
boja. 1 


Mamti- 

memtosl 


merca- 
darias q 
valern e 
camboja 


Regno de 
champaa 

Fol. 138V. 


calambac 


Pasamdo de syam camjnho Da chyna pola costa do maar he o 
Regno de camboja q vay comfynar pola Dita vija com champaa he o 
dito Rey gemtio caual r0 metese sua terra muj t0 polio sertaoo tern 
guerra com os De brema & com syam & as vezes com champaa E 
nom obede9e a nemgue a Jemte de camboja he gerreira 

A terra De camboja hee De mujtos Rijos Demtro tem muj tas 1am- 
charas q vam navegar a costa de syam Da bamda de lugor E amdam 
mujtas vezes darmada comtra toda Roup a he a terra De camboja De 
mujtos mamtimemtos e camtidade he terra De mujtos cavallos ali- 
famtes //: 

Tem a terra De camboja muj t0 aRoz & bom carnes pescado & v os 
a sua guisa & Tem esta tera ouro tem alacar mujtos Demtes dalifam- 
tes peixe seq° aRoz 

Roup a branq a De bemgalla fyna pimemta pouq a / crauo Vrmelhao 
azougue estoraque liqdo comtas Vrmelhas// 

Nesta terra se queimam os senhores por morte do Rey E as molhe- 
res dos Reis & as out a s molheres p morte de seus maridos E amdam 
trosqujadas polas orelhas p° Jemtileza 

Alem da terra De camboja segundo a costa do mar pola terra firme 
he o Regno De champaa// a terra he gramde & de mujto aRoz carnes 
& outs 0 mantimemtos | Nesta terra nom ha portos pa Jumcos gramdes 
tem alguuas pouoa^oees por Rios emtram Demtro com maree cheea 
navios q demamdam braca & meya / De maree vazija ficam as emtra- 
das em sequo navegam em syam atee pahaao mujtas lamcharas/ 

He o Rey Jemtio tem muj ta Jemte he Riquo viue por suas lauoiras 
todos tem cavallos te guerra com outs 0 Reis primcipall memte com o 
Rey De cauchy chyna/ 

As mercadorias De champaa a primcipall he calambac que he o 
lenho aloees ho Vrdadeiro a melhor espefia Delle/ por que o que laa 
em portuguall se vsa he guaro De que qua ha matos tem gramde 
Deferem^a o calambuc em cheiro he sabor & odor / asy como ouro a 
chumbo em ualia E deste calambac em champa ha o melhor & a fomte 
delle/ he gomoso De veas bramqas & pretas he paao mole vail em 

1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘ Camboja Royaume de 
Camboja.’ 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


391 

malaq a cada dous aRates seis sete cz dos & a tall q vail Doze & qmto 
ho paao em prefeyca & mdr asy sobe em valija do pequeno posto q 
seja Da mesma vomdade//. 

Tem ouro De toque do de menancabo em boa camtidade q vem 
Da mjna q mesmo Vay a cauchy os De champaa tem por mercadaria 
ouro em sua onesta valya he ouro em pedacos grosos// 

Trazem della a malaq a peixe seq° salgado aRoz ouro alguua pta Mam- 
por q na terra nom ha outra mercadoria a terra nom he de muj t0 trato ^ mtos 
em malaq a porq de syam lhe acodem mercadarias // 

A pncipall he areq a com que comem o betelle panos bramcos de merca- 
bemgalla synabafos gramdes & peqnos panchaujlizes panos qelijs 

poucos pimemta crauo noz pouca cacho pucho pouq 0 estoraq e em 
liqdo //. champaa 

A moeda meuda sam caixas da chyna & por mercadoria ouro & Moeda da 
prata vail o ouro e champaa a qujmta parte menos q em malaq a & a ^ terfa 
prata a seista parte /. 

No maar he fraqua tem mujtas lamcharas q demamdam pouq 0 Gemte & 
fumdo por Reza Da aguoa ser pouq a navegam na terra que he gramde/ navios l 
nas mercadorias da terra E nos panos De seus trajos que ha na terra 
vam a syam & a cauchy nom tem porto nomeado/ non tem mouros 
em seu Regno//: 

Ho Rey De cauchy china he Rey de maior terra que champaa & / Regno de 
mais Riq a he o Regno amtre champaa E a chyna este na terra he 
poderoso guerreiro tem mujtas lancharas terra atee qoat 0 Juncos tem a 
terra gramdes Rios navegacam nelles nom tem povoadores Junto com 
ho mar mujtos estemdese sua terra mujto pola terra fyrme chamase 
sua terra em malaq a cauchy chyna por Respeito de cauchy coulam & 

ElRey he Jemtio E toda sua gemte nom sam amiguos de mouros 
estes nom navegam em malaq a navegam na china e em champaa he 
gemte mujto fraqua no maar todo seu feito he na terra/ tem gramdes 
senores hee Jumto este ao Rey Da chyna por casamemtos & por este 
Rey nom fazer guerra a chyna traz sempre embaixador na corte Del- 
Rey da chyna ajmda q nom qeira o Rey De cauchy ou leue Diso 
Descomtemtamemto porque he seu vasallo como se dira nas cousas 
Da chyna he cauchy terra De mujtos cavallos 



TOM1S PIRES 


Fol. I3gr. 


jMerca- 
dorias que 
ha na 
terra / De 
cauchy 
chyna 


jMerca- 
dorias q 
valem em 
cauchy 
chyna/ 

/selitre & 
pedrariaj 


moedada 

terra 

Regno da 
ckijna 1 


392 

Hee este Rey dado muj t0 a gueerra E tem Jmfimdos espimgardefros 
& bombardas pequenas gastase mujto gramdisyma copia de poluora 
em sua terra asy na guerra como em todas suas festas & prazeres De 
dia & de noyte asy o vsam todos os gramdes De seu Regno & p as 
omrradas gastase cada dia asy em foguetes como em todo out 0 eixer- 
91910 de prazer poluora como se vera nas mercadorias q la valem//. 

Pincipalmemte ouro pta muj to mais que em champaa calambuc 
nom he Tamto como champaa tem porcelanas & ba^os delas De 
gramde vallya & dalij vaoo a china a vemderese tem de todas sortes de 
tafetas mjlhores mores & mais larguos & fynos q em todallas out a s 
ptes qua & nas nosas/ tem as melhores sedas soltas de cores q q a haa 
em gramde avomdam?a & tudo ysto q asy tem he fyno & perfeito sem 
falsydade que tem as cousas dout a s ptes he tambem aljofar & nom 
muj t0 // : 

A cabe9a Da mercadoria em cauchy prezada he emxofre & deste 
vimte Juncos se tamtos lhe mamdarem laa & vail bem emxufre Da 
china a malaq a muj t0 Jmfimdo vem das Jlhas De solor alem Da 
Jaaoa como se dira qmdo se delas falar & daq vam a cauchy// 

vail asy mesmo gramde copia De salitre & da china lhe vem muj ta 
camtidade & todo se vemde laa// valem Rubijs Diamamtes ?afiras 
toda out a pedraria fyna & alguu amfiam pouquo pimemta pouqa & 
asy das out a s cousas q valem na chyna estoraq e liqMo vail bem//: 

Estes poucas vezes vem a malaq a em seus Juncos vam a china a 
quamtom que he cidade gramde tomar companhias De chijs emtam 
vem por mercadorias com hos chijs em seus Juncos & a pin^ipall 
cousa que trazem he ouro E prata & cousas q compram na chyna//. 

A moeda Das despesas De mantimemtos sam caixas Da chyna & 
por mercadoria ouro & prata//. 

Segumdo o que as na9oes de qua deste leuamte comtam fazem as 
cousas da china gramdes asy na terra como Jemtes Riquezas pompas 
estados / & contas outrs a que mais se creria com uerdade averemse 
em noso portugall q nom na chyna he gramde a terra Da chyna De 
fermosos cavallos & mulas seg° dizem he em gramde numero //. 

Ho Rey da china he Jemtio de gramde terra he Jemte he a Jemte da 
1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘Royaume de Chine.’ 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


393 


chyna branq a da nosa aluura vestem os mais panos pretos Dalgodam 
& diso trazem sayos de cimq 0 qtos De nesguas asy como nos somemte 
sam mujto larguos trazem na chyna nos Jnuernos feltros nas pernas a 
maneira De peuguas he em cima botas bem obradas que nom chegua 
Do giolho pa cima & trazem suas Roupas forradas De pelles cordeiras 
& dout a s pelitarias trazem delles pelicas trazem coyfas de Rede de 
seda Redomdas como peneiras pretas de noso portugall | tern huu 
Jeito Dalemaaes tern na barba trinta quoremta cabellos 9al9am capa- 
tos fram9eses De pomta De ladrilho muyto bem feitos // 

Comem todollos chijs porquos vaquas E de todas out a s alimarias 
bebem getill memte De toda sorte beberajes gabam mujto noso vinho 
embebedamse grade memte he gemte fraqua & para pouco esta q q a 
se vee em malaq a sam De pouca Vedade & furtam ysto a gemte baixa 
comem com dous paaos & altamja ou porcelana na maao esquerda 
Jumto com a boq a & com os dous paos sorvr esta he a guisa Da 
china// 

As molheres parecem castelhanas tern sayas de Refeguos E coses & 
sainhos mais compridos que em nosa terra os cabellos compridos 
emRodilhados p° gemtill maneira em cima Da cabe9a E lamcam nelles 
mujtos preguos Douro pa os ter & aRedor Da pedraria quem ha tern 
E sobre a moleira Joyas Douro E nas orelhas & pescogo/ poem mujto 
aluayade nas fases he arrabiq e sobre elle E sam alcoforadas q seujlha 
lhe nom leua a vamtaja he bebem como molheres De terra fria trazem 
capatos de pomtilha de seda he brocados trazem todas avanos nas 
maaoos sam Da nosa aluura & delas tem os olhos pequenos & outs a 
gramdes. E narizes como ham de ser //. 

A terra Da china he de muj tas cidades fortalezas todas De pedra & 
quaall a cidade omde o Rey estaa chamase cambara 1 (. . . 9idade esta 
. . . yno da chyn a . . . Rey esta . . . s vezes como . . . arra aqual . . . 
ma peqim estas 9idades . . . onje de qato ... fa firme) he de gramde 


Fol. 139V. 


IMolhe- 
res da 
china 


homdeo 
Rey estaa 


1 In the margin of this paragraph there is an addition in the same hand, 
given between brackets above, representing perhaps a couple of lines omitted 
at first by the transcriber after the word cambara. The manuscript was badly 
cropped in binding, part of the words having been cut away. The text may, 
however, be reconstituted as follows: Esta cidade esta no reino da China, 
cujo rei estd Id &s vezes como. . . . Cambarra, a qual se chama Pequim. Estas 
cidades estao longe de Cantao, na terra firme. 



TOME PIRES 


Reis 
vasallos 
ao Rey da 
china seos 
tribu- 
taries q 
Ihe pagam 
pareasj 

Reis 

vasallos 

sem obri- 

gacam de 

pareas 

somemte 

presemtej 


maneira 

dos 

embaixa 
dores 
com ho 
Rey 


Fol. I 40 r. 

Ylhas que 
emtestam 
com achey 
papee 
Jumto 
com pom 
atfa da 
Jlha de 
pomotora 

Guamjs- 

polla 


394 

pouo & de mujtos fydallgos De Jmfinjdos cavallos o Rey nunqua he 
visto do pouo nem dos gramdes salluo de mujto pouquos por asy estar 
em costume Dizem q mulas tem sem conto como se fosse em nosa 
terra// 

EllRey De champa ellRey De canchy china ellRey dos lequjos 
ellRey de Jampon adyamte se fara memcam Destes//. 

EllRRey de Jaaoa ellRey De siam ellRey de pa9ee elRey de malaq a 
estes mamdam seus embaixadores com o sello Da china a ellRey Da 
chyna De cimq° em cinq 0 annos & de dez em Dez annos & cada huu 
lhe mamda do melhor De suas teras do q sabem que laa quere// 

De malaca lhe mamdauam pimemta E samdallos brancos alguu 
paao de boa graDura E asy De garo que he lenho alooes De butiq a 
anees De pedras fynas pasaros q vem De bamda mortos & cousas a 
estas semelhamtes chamalotes he cada huu segumdo tem estes em- 
baixadores podem emtrar na chyna & sair. //. 

Estes embaixadores qmdo vam ao Rey nom o vem somemte ho vulto 
do corpo Detras huua cortina & daly Respomde estamdo sete espuaes 
espeuemdo a palaura qmdo a diz asynam aqujllo os oficiaes mamdaris 
sem o Rey poor a maao nem ser visto tornanse a vijr E se levam De 
presemte mjll faz lhe mer9ee do dobro & os embaixadores em peitas 
leixam tudo laa & tornanse se verem ho Rostro nem a p a Do Rey esta 
he a Vrdade & nom como diziam q estavam quoatro homees asemta- 
dos a vista & falaua com todos sem saberem quail he o Rey e estes 
embaixadores podem amcorar em a cidade de quantom Como se dira 
no Diamte//. 

As Jlhas que se chamam gamispolla sam duas ou tres & majs Jumto 
com a terra de achey & lambry auera obra de dez ou qujnze Jlhas de 
tres quat 0 leguoas e Redomdo & o mar amtrellas he de duas tres 
quoat ro leguoas & Jumto com a terra tem vymte trimta bracas// 

Sam estas Jlhas alguuas dellas abitadas de pouquos moradores tem 
aug a & muj to pescado & lenha tem todas emxufre em camtidade de 
que se fornece pa9ee & pedir //. 

Sam estas Jlhas dellRey dachey E os moradores dellas estes pouq 08 
que sam estam a sua hordenamca prymcipall memte a moor que tem 
muj tos m res (?) E tem alguu trato nestas Jlhas vem da Jlha De 90- 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 395 

motora a fazer pescarias & pescam mujto peixe que he mercadoria e 
alguus lugares de camotora//. 

Achey he a pimeira terra Da bamda do canall da Jlha de gomotora Regno 
he lambry he peguada com ella he estemdese ao sertao E a terra De ^ 

biar estaa amtre achey E pedir E aguora estas terras sam sojeytas ao he a trfa 
Rey Dachey E elle as senhorea & dellas he elle so o Rey De biar ll- 

Este Rey he mouro homem caualeiro amtre seus viz 08 . Vsa de 
furtar qmdo vee tempo tera obra De trimta quoremta lamcharas com 
as quaes amda de armada qndo esta em sua terra vive por suas nouj- 
dades de seus aRozes E mamtimemtos tern Rijos q vem teer no canall 
que emtram por sua terra E na emtrada sam De pouq 0 fumdo/ 

Tern estas terras carnes aRozes & vinhos a sua guisa & out°s 
mantim tos tem pimemta nom mujta o Rey de peedir tern sempre 
guerra com este E este lhe faz dapno mujto em sua terra//. 

Peedir na Jlha de gomotora foy homrrado Riquo & de trato & Regno de 
senhoreou Ja os Regnos sobreditos E tambem a terra de eilabuu & P eedir 
o Regno de lide & o Regno De pirada E tinha guerra com pacee & foy 
Ja pedir sor da boca do canall E tinha o trato em peso E com elle 
nauegavam mais que com pag ee//. 

Athee a era De qujnhemtos & dez annos teue sempre trato sua ci- 
dade he por huu Rijo demtro obra de meia leguoa// ha barra de maree 
chea tem duas bragas tem a cidade mercadores de todas nagoees 
ajmda aguora posto q sempre teuesse guerra com seus vizynhos 
ajmda nom he mujto descaydo// do que soya// Tratam com pedir 
cadano atee duas naaos de cambaya & de bemgala & huua De benua 
quelim & out a de peguu. os q saem com os prym ros vemtos athee 
vymte Juncos pequenos & lamcharas com aRoz / trata com elles 
terraao & tenagary quedaa baruaz depois da tomada de malaq a nom 
teue tamto trato por caso da guerra que teue maior mente por morte 
DellRey madaforxa q morreo & ficaromlhe | dous Filhos pequenos E Fol. 140V. 
leuamtaromse outs 0 com ho Regnno he esteue sempre de guerra que 
he comtraira a mercadoria// 

As mercadorias que pedir teue & terra daq por diamte como a 
guerra acabar & tornar ao seu cadano seis sete athee dez mjll bahares 
de pimenta Dizem q Ja teue obra de qujnze mjll bahares/ tem seda 



aeilabuu 


lidee 


/Pirada/ 


396 tom£ PIRES 

bramq a beijoym em sua terra & na de seus vizinhos tem ouro q vem 
tambem a pedir por vya do sertaao & por causa da pymemta Recebya 
gramdes mercadorias & Retornos de huus & out°s que nobreceo seu 
Regno & sua cidade// 

E de quatro annos a esta parte tera pedir dous tres mjll bahares de 
p ta cadano E mais nom dizem que Ja a terra vay tornamdo adante: 
por causa da guerra que se aleuamtou E polla guerra que athee q teue 
se Sayrom muytos mercadores// Regna em pedir agora huu capitam 
Do Rey & lanujou huu fylho do Rey fora que ora esta em paefe fora 
do seu Regno tem pedir por moeda meuda caixas destanho como 
?eytijs tem dramas douro q valem noue huu cz d0 tem tamgas de prata 
das De syam peguu & bemgalla E corre na terra e sua valija & nas 
mercaDorias De mujta comtia ouro em poo ho peso do bahaar he 
como ho de pa$ee// 

A terra q se chama aeilabuu estaa polla costa do maar alem dos 
termos De peedir este luguar teue Ja Rey E aguora tem mamdarim 
capytam vasallo do Rey de peedir tem este lugar daeilabuu cidade 
honde se trata alguua mercadoria pouca tem pimemta este lugar e 
cantidad E a cidade he Jumto com ho maar tem mamtimemtos pa sy // 

Ho Regno De lidee he alem daeilabuu E comfyna com pirada o 
Rey Desta terra soya ser De pedir aguora nom// tem lugares Jumto 
ao maar em que se trata alguua mercadoria/ tem mercadores trata 
peeguu com ella E outs 0 lugares a terra De lyde he boa de mamtimen- 
tos tem pymemta & seda e sua terra he amiguo DellRey de peedir agu- 
ora tem este Regno lamcharas que navegam & tratam mercadoria este 
pa os viz 08 defemdese he forte em sua terra faz sempre esta terra 
fumdamemto de pedir sam paremtes os Reys este he Rey mouro tem 
mamtimemtos pa sy//. 

Ho Regno de pirada he de mais Jemte que a tera de lidee E o Rey 
mais poderoso era amtigamemte vasallo de pedir aguora nom / / tem duas 
pouoa?o6es Jumto com o mar huua se chama medina & out a [blank] 
tratam mercadaria tem pymemta seda q leuam a pedir E asy leua lyde 
laa a sua/ tem estes feitores em pedir & daly se fornecem sa paremtes 
do Rey de pedjr tem ouro//. tem mamtimemtos pirada e sua terra tra- 
tam com ella de mujtas partes tem trato nom muyto he poderoso pa 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


397 


se poder defemder de paege posto que a Jemte de que se agora fala | Fol. i4ir. 
he mais manhosa que poderosa. & dizem que os de pirada. sam gram- 
demete maliciosos treedores & gemte de pouca verdade amdam a 
furtar as vezes no maar tem guerra com os cafres na terra firm e//. 

Ho Riquo Regno de pacee he de muij t0 pouco E trato comfyna de Regnno 
huua bamda ao Regno de pirada segumdo Ja he dito & da out a com a De P°f ee 
terra de bata de que he Rey ho tamjano he terra a de pacee ao lomguo 
do maar nos termos da baDa do sertaao da Jlha comfyna com os 
termos do Rey de manicopa q saee a out a bamda do maar com que 
alguuas vezes tem guerra/ /. 

E aguora depois de malaq a ser castxguada E peedir amdar em 
guerra o Regno De pagee faz se prospero Riquo de mujtos mercadores 
de nagoees DiVsas mouros qujlijs que gramdememte tratam amtre os 
qees os mais pingipaees sam bemgallas tem Runnes turqos arabios 
parseos guzarates qlijs malaios Ja5os syames// 

He a Jemte de pagee polla mo5r parte bemgalla/ & os naturaees 
desta Jeraga Degemdem E por desta sememte ser tem a terra em 
costume como se adiamte dir a por que nom he duujda no mumdo 
aver vill man ra tall como pacee vsa acerq a do seu Rey//. 

Ho rregno de pacee tem a cidade que se chama pagee E allguus lhe /cidade de 
chama ca motora porque em toda a ylha nom ha cousa tam homrrada ^ aafe ^ 
denomjnou se a dita cidade a toda a Jlha asy que por quallquer destes 
nomes se nomea esta cidade nom tera menos de vymte mjll m res //: 

Tem asy ho Regno de pagee pouoagoees gramdes & de muj ta Jemte 
contra o sertao domde viue a gemte homrrada limpa porque suas 
noujdades que tem a p ta seda beijoym / aas vezes discordam estes 
com pagee mas afirmase q a vomtade destes nas deferemcas pervalege 
a pagee & nestas pouoagoes moram gramdes fidallguos do Regnno 
que se chamam mandaris & a gemte de defemsam//. 


Pagee foy de Reis gemtios E auera aguora cemto sessemta annos q Modo de 
gastarom os ditos Reis por estugia dos mouros mercadores que avya 
no Regno De pagee E ouuerom os ditos mouros as beiras do maar he qha Reis 
aleuamtarom Rey mouro da casta dos bemgallas E des aquelle tempo ® *j e que 
atee guora sempre forom os Reis de pacee mouros somemte os do 


sertaao nom nos poderom ate aguora comVrter & porem nestes 



TOMIi PIRES 


398 

Regnos que ha na Jlha De £omotora os de Junto com ho maar todos 
sam mouros da bamda Do canall de malaca. E os que ajmda ho nom 
som do pouoo fazem nos cada dia mouros E nom he amtreelles Jemtio 
avydo em nenhuua estyma nom semdo mercador// 

asy que os bemgallas despois de leuantare Rey foy com comdicam 
Fol. 141V. que quail quer que podese matar o Rey fose Rey posto q fose de | 
quail quer estado & comdicam semdo mouro esta empresa tomarom 
des aquelle tempo hos gramdes de pa$ee que quem mata o Rey fiqua 
Rey E afirmanse que em huu dia ouue sete Reis em pa^ee porque 
huu matava o out 0 & out 0 o out 0 E levam por groria morrer Reis & 
nom se gardam q dizem que tall hordenanfa he por ds De maneira 
que os Rex nom duram muyto tempo em seu estado & tamto que 
huu mata o out 0 Emterra ho morto com toda solepnjdade Reall 
porque asy estaa a terra em costume E a cidade ne pouoo & mer- 
cadores nom Recebem aluorofo nenhuu posto que matem o Rey ou 
viua I/ 

E por que os bemgalas tall hordenam?a aleuamtaro qujs a terra de 
bemgalla vsar o semelhamte como se vera no Recomtamemto de 
bengala q de setemta annos a esta parte se vsa asy em bemgala he n5 
se acha terra homde este custume dure & aja somente em bemgala E 
em pacee//. 

Em tres meses vierom embaixadores de pagee duas vezes tomar 
vasalagem & obidiemcia a malaq a De como era mortos dous Reis e 
pae<?e p duas vezes que fosem emparados dos purtugueses q a trra & 
gemte he Reis eram espauos DelRey noso sor / como comtinoada- 
memte a vem pedir com outs 0 Reis socedem & o Rey que ora Regna 
he filho DellRey de pirada //. 

He a cidade de pa^ee polio Ryo dent ro obra de m a leguoa. E o Rijo 
sera como o de peedir daquela maneir a alguu tamto mais larguo 
pouq a cousa ambos os Rijos tern padroees nosos nas emtradas 
Merca- Tern pimemta cadanno athee oyto dez mjll bahares a p ta desta ylha 
dorias de nem h e fa bomdade da de cochim he moor mais vaa dura menos nom 
tern a perfeicam do gosto E nom he tamto aRomatica // tern seda E 
beijoym de sua terra E am pace achares todallas mercaDarias q ha em 
toda a ylha por q acodem aly//. 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


Ha moeda meuda como ceitijs sam drrs destanho com nome do l/moedas 

f)gso r>e 

Rey que Reyna, ha dr°s douro pequenjnos a que chama dramas estes p acee j 
valem noue huu cz d0 E cada huu destes creio que vail de qujnhemtas 
caixas acima tern ouro em poo & pta ho seu bahar da pymeta he 
menos q o de malaq a cimq° quates que sam xij aRates menos // 

Hos mercadores que em pa?ee tratam sam guzarates quijlis begalas ^ erca \ 

peguus syames queda baruaz & destes Ja sam Repartidos tantos ha | t °atame 

pa$ee e tamtos a peedir E o Rastamte a malaq a do leuante nom trata pagee e 

buncos 

com pa?ee somemte com a populosa cidade De malaq a que de fidades naoos / j 
como pacee se podiam fazer dez do pouo De malaca no tempo de seu 
castiguo quamdo Recebeo emmenda do erro q cometeo .//. T ^ 2r 

Asy este tall nobrecimento q pa^ee Recebeo polio acomtecido em 
malaq a Reformada malaq a como cada dia se faz tornara pa?ee a fiq ar 
no seu & peedir com ajuda do muy alto ds os Rex de pacee pedir 
Pryncipallmete E todos os comteudos nesta Jlha seram trebutarios & 
vasallos de cuja malaqa aguora hee por q dout a man a e huu anno nom 
avera pa£ee nem peedir & elles q ho emtende se fazem vasallos pm° 
q hos Requeira //. 

Tern pa^ee ho drrto do peso de toda a mercadoria por bahar huu Drftos em 
maz da say da & tern ancoragem segumdo he a naao ou Jumco // de P a C ee 
mamtimentos nom paguam nada somemte presemte das out a s mer- 
cadorias q vem Do ponemte seis por cemto & todo espauo que vam la 
vemder cimq 0 mazes douro & de toda mercadaria que tira pa fora ora 
seja pymemta ou out a qll qr paguua por bahar huu maz// pa^ee ne 
pedir no tern Junco nenhuu tern lamcharas ate duas tres quoat ro de 
carg a estes vinham amtig a memte comprar Juncos a malaq a / os 
mercadores de pa?ee compram Juncos a out°s mercadores q dout a s 
ptes la va tratar por que em pa?ee nom se faze por Reza Da pouq a 
madeira q ha na terra De paao Jaty que he forte pa os juncos//. 

Ho Regnno De bata de huua pte comfyna com o Regno De pacee Regno de 
& da out a com o Regno de daruu // chamase o Rey desta terra Raja bata ‘ 1 
tomjam Este he mouro Caualeiro amda a furtar no maar mujtas vezes 
este he Jemrro DellRey daruu este Recolheo a naao Froll de la mar q 

1 On the same line and in a much more modern hand, there follow the 
words: ‘ Bata (k Sumatra).’ 



400 


tom£ pires 


com tormemta se pdeo Davamte sua terra & dize q Recobrou tudo 
qmto aguoa nom podia danar Do quail Dizem q he mujto Riq° he be 
Riq° segumdo dizem este tomjano //: 

Este tomjano tem muytas vezes guerra no sertaoo as vezes peleja 
com o sogro aas vezes com paa£ee & quem vee mais poderoso ajuda 
& de todos Recebe dizem que sempre os Reis de batar teuerd este 
costume// tera atee trimta ou quoremta lamcharas bem atabyadas q 
saem ao canall por Rijos que sua terra tem por q Junto a o maar nom 
tem mais moradores q espias pa saber quem pasa tem a dita terra de 
bata aRoz & vinhos fruytas tem breu de q faze muytas camdeas & 
vam la carreguar Dellas tem muyto mell & sera tem camfora pouq a 
De comer tem a pincipall mercadaria can as que chama Rotaas e 
gramde camtidade que he boa mercadoria porque servem de cabres 
& de fyo em tudo//. 

Fol. 142V. Ho Regno de daruu he Regnno gramdejjmoorque nenhuu dos que 
Regrmo de at ^ e a § ora sam Ditos em samotora E nom he Riquo por mercadorias 
daruu . 1 & trato que o nom tem este tem mujta gemte mujtas lamcharas este 
he o modr ladram De todo 9omotora E mais poderoso em saltos de 
furtos he Rey mouro viue no sertaao tem Rios e sua terra muytos a 
terra e sy he alagadisa que se nom pode emtrar//. 

Este esta sempre dasemto em seu Regno os seos mamdaris & seu 
povo amdam no maar a furtar & partem com elle por que da armada 
alguua pte he a sua custa Des ho primcipio de malaq a teue sempre 
guerra com rnalaq 8 & & lhe tem tomada mujta Jemte saltea 
huua aldea & levalhe tudo atee os pescadores & sempe os malayos se 
vigiam gramdememte dos daruus porque tem esta Reixa Ja abitada he 
fiquou pa sempe domde saio o Rif am daruu com malaq a / achey com 
pedir/ pedir com quedaa & syam/ pahao com syam da out a banda/ pa- 
limbam com limgua/ calates com bajus &c/ & cada huua destas nacoes 
pelejam huua comtra out a E muy poucas vezes tem amjzade//. 

He a Jemte de daruu presumtuosa guerreira de quem se nom fya 
nengue se nom furtam nom viuem E portamto nom tem amjzade com 
ella tera cem paraoos & mais cada vez que qr'/ nam mujto grades 
cousas mais sotijs pa cheguuar q pa leuar cargua//. 

1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘Aru Sumatra).’ 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


tem a terra De daru muyto aRoz & mujto aluo & bom e em m ta 
camtidade tem mujtas carnes pescados v os a sua guisa fruytas em 
mujta abastan 9 a 

tem camfora de comer em boa camtidade tem ouro tem m t0 
beijoym he bom tem lenho loees de butiq a tem Rotaas breu fera 
mell espauos homees molheres tem alguus mercadores pouquos 
alguuas destas mercadorias se gastam por vija de pae^e & pedir & 
out a s por vya de pamchur por que a terra de daruu. Della he na terra 
De menancabo & laa tem gramdes Rijos por demtro por homde toda 
a Jlha de camotora se navegua & destes luguares tem hos pannos pa 
seus vestidos & out a s cousas 

Tem daruu na terra darqat huua pouoacam homde em certos 
meses faz feira despauos homees molheres & framqua pode quern 
quyser laa Jr segura memte & vay 11a mujta gemte a compar estpauos 
E alguuas pesoas mamdam comprar seus fs° & fs a as maies & maridos 
as molheres E tambem nellas se trata outs a mercadarias he asy se vsa 
com os celates como se dira qmdo se dos celates ladroes falar em seu 
luguar //. 

Ho Regno de arcat comfyna de huua pte com daruu & da out a com 
yrcam ho Rey he mouro tem pequena terra tem paraos pequenos nom 
he de trato muj t0 / he vasallo DellRey de daruu. a Jemte deste Regno 
nas beiras do mar sam ladroees celates & os da terra dentro viue p 
suas novidads //. 

Tem esta terra ouro tem aRoz vinhos pescados & carreguam de 
pescado seq° E salguado aq ha terra deste nom emtra nella senom 
paraoos muj t0 pequenos por esteiros he paremte o Rey do Rey de 
daruu//. 

A terra de Jrcan he amtre arcat E o Regno de rrupat esta terra nom 
tem Rey tem mamdary este he vasallo DelRey De malaq a que foy a 
Juda uao no tpo Da guerra com Remeiros & Jemte darmas hos quaees 
aviam de serujr grafiosa memte. somemte polio comer, esta gemte 
sam delies mujtos celates que quer Dizer na limguoajem malay a 
ladroees do maar //. 

tem a terra De purim ouro aRoz tem este a pescaria dos sauees 
Domde os trazem a malaca em gramde camtidade & tambem ha nesta 

M H.C.S. II. 


1 1 merca- 
doriasjl 



Regno de 
Rupat. 1 


1 1 terra De 
purimll 


Regno de 
piac 


Fol. 1 43V. 

Regno De 
campar. 2 


402 TOME PIRES 

terra feira despauos q elles furtam E outs 0 ladroees & vem nos vemder 
a este luguar & tambem a purim // 

O Regno de Rupat comfyna de huua parte com Jrcan & da out a 
com purim he Regno pequeno a m5r pte da Jemte sam ladroees e 
paraos pequenos tern este a mesma obrigaga a malaca que tern a terra 
de Yrcan socorre com Jemte na guerra/ tern yso mesmo aRoz pouquo 
v os fruytas & tern pescaria de savees e gramde camtidade & do out°s 
pescados//. 

A terra de purjm comfyna De huua bamda com Rupat & da out a 
c5 ciac tern mamdarim esta terra pesoa poderosa he vasallo de malaq a 
pola maneira que se dixe De Jrcan & Rupat acode com Jemte Remei- 
ros e gramde abastamga he a mor pte da Jemte deste luguar sam 
gelats ladroees he criamse no mar E sam gramdes Remeiros //. 

Este purim tern feira dos espauos que furtam mor que os dous 
lugares De que falamos tirando arcat tem asy mesmo estee purim 
mujtos savees & out°s pescados em muj ta camtidade tem alguu ouro 
aRoz v os carnes E outs 0 mamtimemtos este mamdarim de purjm he 
p a pncipall E gramde guerreiro //. 

O Regno De giac de huua bamda comfyna com purim & da out a 
com campar o Rey daq he mouro esta terra tem trato & mercadors 
alguus he ciac terra que tem aRoz mell gera Rotaas lenho aloes De 
butiq a tem mais ouro q hos tres lugares q dixemos tem v os he outs 0 
mantimentos // 

Este Rey tem boa valia na terra he paremte DellRey de malaq a he 
do Rey De campar he trebutario a elle & o Rey de campar trebutario 
a malaq a por sy & pello out 0 defemdese a terra deste por demtro tem 
Rios gramdes q vam por detras pola terra firme este Rey tem paraos 
mujtos E fazemse em sua terra p causa da muj ta madeira que hy ha//. 

Ho Regno De campar de huua parte confyna com ciac & da out a 
com campom tem esta terra Defromte de sy as Jlhas de carjmom & 
de gelaguy guy/ E De sabam que comecam a fazer canall pa Jaaoa. & 
out a s bamDas // amtre as Jlhas E a terra de campar chamase 0 canall 
de campar por que daly comega//. 

1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘ Rupat (& Sumatra).’ 

2 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘ Camper , (a Sumatra).’ 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


403 

Estes Rex de campar sam paremtes do Rey que foy de malaq a & o 
que aguora he casado com huua sua f a se chama Raja audela// Junto 
com ho maar nom tern seu Regno pouoagoees emtra por huu Rijo 
De cimq 0 seis sete bracas E neste Rijo se faz huu macareo grade 
AJuntamse as aguoas de muy tos Rijos no larguo he em pouq 0 espago 
sobe agoa em gramde altura. & sobymdo derama vagas de man a q 
soVrte & espedaga qll quer cousa que acha & se os que emtram 
Demtro nom tern aviso de catar tempo pa emtrar pdemse mujtas 
vezes //. 

He esta terra de campar esterile de pouq 0 proueito corem polio 
Rijo sete & oyto dias & laa sam as pouoagoees nom mujtas o Rijo 
corre violemta memte & he maao De navegar com as corremtes easy 
no cabo Jumto com a deradeira pouoagam do dito Rey se apartam os 
Rijos o de campar & o De menancabo & o de ciac & a emtrada da foz 
dout 0 Rijo que campar tern se faz out 0 Rijo gramde que vem fazemdo/ 
ciac/ purjm / Rupat/ Jrcan Jlhas & vem sair defromte De malaq 3, 
pllo quail veio paty onuz com marees por q hos vemtos eram Ja com- 
trairos no canall pa cheguar a malaq a porem elle tornou a popa com 
vemto & fresco fogeo nos Juncos o quail feito Durara mujto tempo 
p° memorxa// 

tem este Regno muj t0 lenho aloees de butiq a chamase em malay 0 Merca- 
garuu E na Jmdia agujlla tem ouro breu tem gera mell comfyna no dorias 
sertao com os Reis De menamcabo & trata com elles 

Tem aRozes carnes pescados v os tampois de tudo ysto tempera- Mamti- 
dam te p aguouernar sua terra estes trazem suas mercadorias a malaq a memtos 
Retornam panos qelijs & do guzarate q sam da valia de toda a Jlha E 
em menamcabo pincipall memte bretamgijs Vrmelhos 

A terra de capocan he amtre campar & amdarguery esta terra Terra De 
amtyga memte tinha Rey De dez annos a esta parte tem mamdarym cam P°~ 
he terra pequena e este mamdarim he da obediemcia de malaq a / tem 
esta terra alguus mercadores trazem ouro a malaq a leva pannos qujlis 
& do guzarate//. 

Tem esta terra De campocan ouro tem lenho aloes de butiq a tem 
gera mell breu Rotaas & cousas de que tem capar he terra pequena he 
boa tem defromte de sy | as ylhas de buaya que fazem o canall por que Fol. 144-r. 



Regnno 

Damdar- 

guery . 1 


Terra de 
tuiicall 


Terra De 
Jamby . 1 


4°4 TOME PIRES 

asy como a costa de comotora vay huu luguar E outro comtamdo asy 
as Jlhas //. De mamtimemtos tem pa sua terra avomdosa memte 
aRozes carnes pescados vinhos fruytas he muytas esteiras peixe sequo 
Em camtidad e//. 

Ho Regnno Damdarguerij de huua parte tem por termos a terra De 
campocam E Da out a tem com a terra de tunqall he amdarguery 
Regno homrrado //. Da gemte mercantiva tem onestamemte & de 
mujtos lugares vem a elle fazer mercadaria. he primcipall porto de 
menamcaboo//. 

Os Reis damdarguery sam paremtes dos Reis de malaq a & de 
campar & de pad a terra nom he mujto gramde mas he de Jemte 
domestiq a ao trato da mercadaria nom som maall tratados os merca- 
dores que laa vam damdargery vem a malaq a por que amdarguery he 
da obidiemqia de malaq a asy como campar// 

Faz amdarguery comer?io e trata com certa parte da terra De 
menamcabo no sertaao polio quail acolhe muyto ouro a maao de que 
compa muj tos pannos E desta maneira faz sua mercadoria // tem em 
sua terra as mercadorias que tem campar he em mais avomdamca & 
asy os mamtim tos E carnes tem amdarguecy defromte de sy as ylhas 
Delimgua //: 

A terra De tumcall ajumtase de huua parte com amdarguery & da 
out ra com a terra de Jamby esta terra nom tem Rey nem mamdary he 
terra obydiemte a malaca por tributo he terra pequena tambem com- 
fyna com menamcabo// 

Tem as mercadorias que tem amdarguery nom em tamta camtidade 
tem bem de mamtimemtos pa sy & pa outre tem defromte as Jlhas De 
calamtigua/ /. 

A terra De Jamby he de huu cabo apeguada com a terra De tumcall 
& da out ra parte com a terra de palimbao no sertao com menamcabo 
& defromte te as ylhas de pullo berella Esta terra tinha amtigamemte 
Rey he da sorte Damdarguery & despois que os mouros Jaoos se 
comecarom a fazer poderosos que tomarom palimbao tomarom Jamby 
E nom forom mais chamados Reis mas chamamse pates q em malaq a 

1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘ Andargiri (a Sumatra).’ 

2 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘ Jamby (k Sumatra).’ 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


405 

quer dizer mamdarijs e em nosa limguoajem Vrdadeiram te guoVrna- 
dores com poder De ciuell E cryme capitall memte em toda p a De 
suas terras tem toda a Jurdicam somemte pderom o nome De Reis & 
mudaronse em pates como se decrarara fallamdo da gramde Jaoa //. 

Tem a dita terra de Jamby lenho loees de butiq a & ouro & as merca- 
darias De tumcall E os outs 0 lugares tem Ja mais mamtimetos he da 
obidiem^ia de pate Rodim sor de demaa / Ja a gemte da terra de 
Jamby tem mais pte De palimboes & Jaos q de malaios he trra farta & 
Riq a esua guisa // 

todos os Regnos que temos dito Des arcat atee quy tem mujtas Fol. 144V. 
lamcharas todos tratam em malaq a todo anno E tudo he terra De 
menamcabo & todos sam malayos 

A terra gramde de palimbao de huua parte comfyna com Jamby & H terra de 
da out 3, hee aa Pomta & cabo da ylha de fomotora que se chama tana f ^^"1 
malay 0 E do sertao & costa Do maar que torna camjnho de pausur ou 
pamfhur vay comfynamdo com caupo tulumbavam amdallos & no 
sertao com terra De pyramam que he na terra De manamcabo/ tem 
palimbam Defromte de sy no canall as Jlhas de monomby & as Jlhas 
De bamca & palimbam de pate Rodim sor de demaa he a mor pte De 
Jemte de palimbam gemtija de Jemte baixa & tambem mujtos pates 
Jentios 

A terra De palimbam tinha em sy Reis Jemtios & era da obidiem^ia 
do Rey cafre Da Jaaoa & depois q hos pates mouros Da Ja5a se 
asenhorearom das beiras do maar fezerom guerra mujto tempo a 
palimbao & tomarom a terra & nom teue mais Reis somemte pates & 
de pates pmcipaes tem palimbam dez ou Doze tem palimbao obra de 
dez mjll dos qees mujtos deixarom as vidas na guerra de malaq a 
comtranos//. 

A tera de palimbao he a melhor cousa que o pate Rodim tem melhor 
que sua terra E he aguora destroyda por nos todos seus Juncos & 
champanas & mortos os sres De palimbam no desbarato de pate onuz 
posto que os palimbaees de maa vomtade vinham pelejar a malaq 3, 
porem morrerom todos os q vynham // & porque esta verdade nom 
hee pa este paso torno a descrica & Recomtamemto de palimbam &c 
1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘Palimbau (& Sumatra).’ 



TOME PIRES 


Ylhas que 
fazem o 
canall 


Fol. I45r. 


406 

Trata palimbao em malaq a & trata com pahao grosa memte tem 
palimba mujtos Juncos & pamgajavas De carregua viryam cadanno a 
malaca dez e qujnze Juncos Darroz bramq 0 & bom legumes muj tos & 
este aRoz he mercadoria pmcipall tem asy espauos mujtos p° merca- 
doria tem gmde copia Dallgodam tem Rotaas em gramde camtidade 
tem alguu ouro aRoz por pilar muyto tem breu ferro tem mujta ?era 
mell v os mujtos carnes atee alhos cebolas trazem Jmfimdas que he 
boa mercadaria tem mujto beijoym preto em muy ta camtidade 
que se gasta na bonua qlim e em marca5ar tamjompura he nas outs a 
ylhas /I 

Gastase em palimbao gramde camtidade de Roup a dos guzarates 
da baixa & dos qujlijs todo seu dr° das mercadorias empregam em 
malaq a & mais o que traz em ouro como fazem todos os que a malaq a 
vem carregam de mercadorias levam gramde copea de Roup a dos 
qujllijs// 

Defromte de ciar as Jlhas de pulo pica defromte de campar as ylhas 
de carimam dos felates E sabam estes tem mamtimetos pouqos & 
tem moradores Defromte de capitam// as ylhas de buaya defromte de 
amdarguery as ylhas de limgua//. 

As ylhas De limgua como seja disse nas terras Da Jurdi5§o Do 
Regnno de malaqua sam mujto pouoadas tem Rey sam estes cabaees 
caval ros tem atee quoremta lamcharas tem m tas lamcarxas / tem lim- 
gua lenho aloees De butiq a tem mujto aRoz E mamtimemtos he boa 
terra | Defemdese dos comtrairos este he como Rey dos ^elates he 
temjdo poderoso mais que campar he a terra semelhamte tem sua 
terra trato tera quoatro ou cimq 0 mijll homees estas ylhas & pola 
pomta delas comtra as ylhas de buay a se faz ho canall pa pahao & 
bymta & pa syam & todas estas outs a ptes 

E defromte de tumcall estam as tres Jlhas que sse chamam calam- 
tigua estas sa desertas E nom tem moradores tem aguoa boa-// 

E defromte das Jlhas de berella tambem sam desabitadas alguus 
celates se acolhem a ellas as vezes tem muyta aguoa// 

E defromte de palimbam na pmeira terra as Jlhas de monomby 
estas ylhas sam de tamta pouoacam como limgua E em alguua ma- 
neira obedecem a pate onuz mas nom muy t0 tem mamdaris tem 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


407 

mujtas lamcharas tem lenho aloees de butica tern gera mell tem mujtos 
mamtimetos em abastam^a toda he huua terra monomby & bamca he 
de pate onuz de Japera alem de monomby Defromte da derradeira 
terra de palimbao estam as ylhas De bamca estas tem pate sam de 
patee onuz mouro Jaao tem estas Jlhas obra de mjll moradores amti- 
gamemte teuero sete oyto mjll// tem lenho aloes de butiq a tem fera 
mell ferro alguodam tem mujtos mamtimemtos//. 

Defromte de tana malalo esta a Jlha que se chama ku^eparij esta he 
no cabo do canall Desta Jlha comtra lesnordeste sam tudo ylhas E 
Restimguas he comtra leste he o canall pa maluq 0 E comtra lessueste 
atee ho sudueste he a Ja5a E do sudueste atee ho este he o Regno de 
cumda & desde lucepary atee a pmeira terra de Ja5a que demorara a 
lessueste ou ao sueste seram cemto & vimte leguoas a prymeira terra 
que se toma na Jaoa & a Jlha de mamdalica que he peguada com a 
terra de Jarapara tres ou quoatro leguoas do porto De patij onuz se 
neste capitollo nom for mujto certo Reportome aos capitollos por lhe 
nom vsar por seus ofiglos De lucepary a terra de Japara naos nosas 
yram em tres dias com suas noites vento de monfa 

No cabo da terra De palimbam esta a terra que se chama tana ma- Tana 
lay° tem defronte De ssij as Jlhas de lu^eparij E a esta Jlha tem dous malaio 
canaees huu da bamda de palimbam & out 0 melhor comtra as ylhas 
de bamca. E comfyna esta terra com terra De 9acampom tem esta 
terra pate tem alguodam mujto tem Rotaas breu te mujtos mamti- 
memtos em abastam^a tem alguu ouro Desta terra dizem q sairom hos 
fumdadores de malaqua paramjcura como Ja he dit5 //. 

Aguora comecamos de tornar pola Jlha easy camjnho doeste 9a- Terra de 
campom he terra gramde tem de huua bamda a terra que se chama 
tana malaio & da out a tulimbaua he esta terra farta tem pate trata este 
em 9umda & na Jaaoa & he gramde trato o desta terra com 9umda 
Dizem q estaa a vista de 9umda tem a terra deste gramde copea 
D alguodam tem ouro pouquo tem mujto mell 9era breu Rotaas tem 
alguua pymemta & boa dizem/ tem mujto aRoz carnes pescados 
vinhos frujtas este pate seg° dizem he cafre & sua Jemte he | no Fol. 145V. 
sertao Deste sam cafres como he gerto que easy toda a Jlha de como- 
tora no sertao sa gemtios & estes nom sam obidiemtes a nengue 



tom£ pires 


Terra de 

tulim- 

bavam 


terra De 
amdallor 
Regno 


Regno De 
pyrama 


408 

atravesam a Ja5a em tres dias Em lamcharas out°s Dizem que em huu 
Dia vam a terra De ?umda// 

A terra De tulumbaua De huua parte comfyna com ?acampom & 
da out a com amdalaz no sertao comfyna com Reis cafres este tambem 
dizem que he Jentio ou cafre tern a terra Deste pimemta tern ouro & 
as cousas que tern ?amcap5 tern lamcharas tern muj tos mamtimem- 
tos tern gramdes Rios em ssuas terras por homde tern suas pouoa- 
9 oees por estes lugares he trra forte porque nom te senom huua 
bra$a daugua nas etradas dos Rios tratam na Jaaoa e em cunda estes 
e e sua terra nom tratam com elles elles leua suas merdadarias 11a 
tem gramde Camtidade Dallguodam & Daq atrauesam a Jaoa em 
dous ds 

O Regno De amdallor De huua pte comfyna com terra de tulum- 
baua & da out a com o Riquo Regno De pirama & no sertao com 
os Reis de menancabo defronte de sy amdadura de huu dia & huua 
noyte ten a terra de ?umda & amtre andalor & cumda he maar & 
p5s este soyam vijr os guzarates a Jaoa E a agracy tomar carregua 
Do crauo noz ma^as & samdallos bramcos cubebas etc/ porq Diziam 
q amtre este amdalor E cumda que tudo eram baixos & de Restim- 
guas & que se nom navegaua ysto diziam a nos/ o que nom hee asy 
amte he fumdo he de boa navegacam E amtigamemte sempe se 
naveguou dos guzarates amtes q malaq a asy Recolhese suas mercada- 
rias omde todos acudiam e emtam leixarra os guzarates esta navegaca 
posto q a navegaca com a monca era boa porq emtrauam por cumda & 
corriam a costa de chemano & pemano chorobam toda a terra De 
demaa Japara & tornavam sobre tubam & dally a agacij o q tudo fa- 
ziam com huu vemto //. 

Do Regno Damdalor torno a terra viramdo ao noroeste ate dar nas 
Jlhas q estam Junto com gamjspolla E comecamdo a virar nos mostra 
a terra o Regno De piramam // comfyna piramam de huua bamda com 
amdalor & da out a com tico & do sertam com menamcabo este Regno 
he de Jentios E o Rey Jemtio aquj se ajuntam nesta costa tres Regnos 
.s. pirama tico/ & pamfur ou pamchur ou barns estes todos sam Riquos 
& aq vem cadano hos guzarates com huua nao duas tres com merca- 
dorias Despachanas & leuam seus Retornos como se dira acabamdo 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 409 

de falar nestes tres Regnuos tem o Regno de pirama mujtos cavallds 

que vam vemder comtynoada memte ao Regnuo de cumda//. 

tem esta terra De piramam muj t0 ouro lenho aloes de butiq a cam- 

fora de duas maneiras beijoym seda cera mell/ tem mamtimemtos em 

abasta?a pa sua terra tem gramde trato com a terra De ?umda/ / 

O Reyno de tiquo de huua parte se ajunta com pirama & da out a 

se ajunta com terra & Reino de pamchur do sertao se ajunta com a Terra do 

trra de menancabo este Rey dizem que he Jemtio & out°s Dizem que Re S no 

, Detico 

he mouro tem este as mercaDarias q disemos de pirama que tem bem 
pamsur tem este Reino muj ta Jete & tem grande trato com os guzara- 
tes //. 

Aguora se nos chegua a maao Falar no Riquisemo Regn5 de barns Fol. i46r. 
q por out ro nome se chama panchur ou pamsur a na?am dos guzara- Regno de 
tes chamanlhe panchur E asy parses arabijos quelijs bemgallas etc 
camotora chamalhe baruus tudo he huu Regno nom sam dous 
comfijna este com tiqo de huua bamda & da out a com terra do Regno 
De qujnchell no sertao tem seu trato com os menacabos & diamte de 
sy no maar tem a ylha de mjnhac barras de q se dira // 

Este Regno he cabefa do trato destas cousas de toda a Jlha de 
5 omotora por q esta he a escalla por homde se o ouro vay & a seda 
beijoym camfora em catidade lenho aloes de butiq a cera mell E out a s 
cousas de que este Regno he mais abastado q nemhuu dos outs 0 Ja 
ditos//. na Jlha De comotora o beijoym de barns tiq° pirama he 
muj t0 & alujsymo //. Estes tres Regnos que avemos contado .s. 
pamchur tiquo piramao tem a chaue Da terra. De menamcabo E asy 
p todos serem paremtes como por estes terem as beiras Do maar E os 
guzarates virem alij cada huu anno & fazem gramde mercadaria & 
ajumtase nestes Regnos as mercadorias & fazem seu trato com os ditos 
guzarates/ vem cadano huua nao duas tres vemdem toda sua Roup a 
Recolhem mujto ouro & seda mujto beijoym mujto lenho alois 
camfora de Duas maneiras Mujta de comer/ mujta cera muj t0 mell os 
guzarates despacha toda sua mercadaria porque he da valia Da terra 
E o pouo he mujto & daly vay pa fumda & pa as Jlhas de diua porq as 
Jlhas de diua vem cheguar defronte de £umda & vam por diamte De 
toda camotora Da bamda daloeste atee gamispolla & atee cananor & 



410 


TOM IS PIRES 


Ylha q se 
chama 
maruz 
mjnhac. 


Regno De 
qinchell 


Fol. 146V. 

Regnno De 
mamcopa 


Regnos De 

menan- 

cabo. 1 


destas partes em cimqo dias vam as Jlhas De diua segumdo afyrmam 
os mercadores/ o que ( ?) trazem de diua & 

Asy que feita sua mercadaria os guzarates tornamse Riq 08 E 
vemdem E tratam a sua vomtade Dizem os pilotos que de baruz pa 
?umda que o camjnho nom he muj t0 linp 0 E que ate baruz he limp 0 
semp Jumto com terra Eu fuy Ja por detras desta Ylha obra De xb 
leguoas & Jumto com terra achavamos vymte cinq 0 bracas 

Defromte deste Regmo De baruz estaa esta Jlha que se chama 
maruz mynhac tern mujta Jemte tem azeyte de peixe E muj t0 pescado 
sequo & aRoz Dizem q Defromte de pirama esta huua Jlha \blank] 
e q nam ha senom molheres nam tem homees & que emprenha 
dout°s q la vam tratar E que se torna loguo & q out a s emprenha do 
vemto esta opynjam tem os destas partes como no momte de rnalaq 3, 
que se chama gulom ley dam a Raynha emcamtada / Jaz esta fee no 
pouo/ como no pouo out°s amazonas & sebilla de Roma//. 

Ho Regno De qinchell de huua parte comfyna com o Regno De 
pao & da out a com ho Regno De mamcopa ou Daya & da bamda do 
sertao com Jemte Rebusta salvajem bestiall que comem omees he 
este Rey Jemtio tem este beijoym seda p ta alguua ouro pouq 0 tem 
lamcharas pequenas tem Rios he cousa nom muj t0 Riq a em todo este 
Regno Dize que come homes dos Jmigos De pafee trata aquj e em os 
Regnos De baruz tico pirama//. 

0 Reino De macopa ou day a tem estes Dous nomes comfyna de 
huua parte com qnchell & da outra bamda vem easy daar nas ylhas q 
estam pegadas com a terra De labry he este Rey Jemtijo// no sertam 
comfyna com Jemte Rubusta bestiall Da serra q vay sobre pa?ee & 
pedir he gramde terra a deste Rey demtro na terra he Rey poderoso 
guerreiro os q toma comemse dos Jmiguos tratam nelle de pacee 
pedir nom come omees somemte os com que tem guerra tem este 
seda beyjoym & cousas daquella parte os q la vam vam em paraos 
peqnos leuam panos De cambaya dos baixos/ 

E porque Ja he feito ho Recomtamemto de toda a Jlha de camotora 
aRedor seg a promessa Da primeira na^am aguora nom pareceria bem 

1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘Rmes de Menancabo. 
(Sumatra.)’ 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 41I 

ficarem os Reis de menacabo sem delles se dizer pois sam fauore?idos 
douro metall que ds escolheo 

Sam os Reis de menamcabo tres ho mais primcipall se chama Raja 
9unci teras que he a pouoacam de seu asemto o segumdo se chama 
Raja bamdar JrmaSo do Rey Ja dito o terfeiro se chama rraja bom90 
ou Raja buus estes sam os Rex De menamcabo o pmeiro Dizem que 
he mouro ha pouco tempo obra de xb annos os Dous dizem que sam 
ajmda Jemtios estes mujtas vezes sam discordes he tern guerra ho 
mais Do temp 0 //. 

Da bamda de malaca come9a ha terra Darcat atee Jamby se chama Portos 

terra De menamcabo posto que mais verdadeira memte seja o sertam mzinhos 

& da out a bamda da Jlha De 9omotora comtra ho sull he piramam qabu E 

tico & pamchur por estes portos se despemde todo ho ouro Da terra 9 “ e 

se chama 

De menamcabo he sem Duujda aquj he o primcipall da Jlha toda menan- 
omde o ouro na9e posto quern toda a Jlha ha pouco ou mujto porem cabo 
tomamdo darcat atee Jamby & de piramam a baruz ou pamchur com 
os tres Reis de menacabo aquella se chama mais propia mete terra De 
menamcabo//. 

A pmcipall mjna domde se tira mais ouro E mais groso he a terra lugares he 

homde pasa o Rio que se chama 9uen9ynjgujs E a segumda omde se m J nas 

... Douro 

acha mais e poo chamase marapalaguj Dizem q huua mjna E out a na terra 

todos os tres Reys sobreditos podem apanhar o que hee hordenam9a demenam- 

da terra que nenhuu mouro nom pode Jr as mjnas somemte os Sres 

Jemtios tem as mjnas e elles ham o ouro & daly se espalha aos Rex de 

menamcabo & dos tres Reis se espalha a out°s he a camtidade do ouro 

q se cadano tira das ditas mjnas dizem que tiram Dous bahares 

Douro E mais segumdo os mouros dizem//. 

Dizem os que Ja forom na terra De menamcabo que ha huu maar 

daguoa Do9e que cera seis leguoas em Redomdo & duas em larguo & 

que Daredor delle ha mujtas pouoacoes & que navegam no dito maar & 

que este maar se faz daguoa que vem de huua serranja gramde & que 

ha graDe pescaria Demtro E que o peixe apodre9e em pouq 0 espa90 

como o pescam & que este laguo he da Jurdicam De todos tres Reis//. 

Segumdo dizem parece com Rezam a Jlha de comotora teer 

aRedor setecemtas leguoas comecamdo Das Jlhas De gamispolla ate 


Maar na 
terra De 
menam- 
cabo 


Fol. 147. 



412 


TOME PIRES 


Meedyda tomar a ellas cercando como dito hee E nam he Duujda teer as ditas 

Jlha de setecemtas leguoas & mais 

comotora ° 

aRedor. Muy tos Reis Jemtios que ha na Jlha de comotora E muj tos sres 
no sertao Demtro Da Jlha mas como nom sam p as De mercadoria E 
conhecidos nom se faz deles nenhuua men^a Daqui por diante se 
falara Da ylha de Jaoa he ?umda E lleuarsea seu Recomtamemto hor- 
denadamemte//. 

Nom pase por esquecimemto esta Jlha de gomotora ser de tamto 
pouoo homde se gastam gramdes camtidades De rroupas Dos quelljs 
& guzarates os qees amdamdo as cousas em hordenam?a como Damte 
era todos estes vinha a malaca polla moor pte trazer as mercadarias 

Descricam j) e t 0( j a a Jlha E leuar os panos & outs a mercadarias a suas terras 

& Recotn- 

tan^o da segumdo o costume De cada huu 


Sera o prim?ipio Do Recomtamemto do Regnno De <pumda E Dalij 
nos termjnaremos e bulambuam que he o cabo das terras sabidas que 
tern pates & despois de se falar Dos sres que viuem nas beiras Do 
maar emtam se falara do gramde Rey Jentio De demtro do sertao da 
Jaaoa & do seu capitam mor guste pate E do Regno De cumda se dira 
Em pm9ipio o que se delle ofrecer '//. 

Pimeira memte o Rey de fumda a ssua gramde cidade de dayo a 
pouoacam he terras & porto De bamtam o porto De pomdam / o 
porto de chegujdee o porto De tamgaram o porto de calapa o porto de 
chemano ysto hee cumda por q ho Rijo De chemano he estremo 
Dambollos Regnos//. 

A terra De cheroboam a terra De Japura a terra De locarj atrra De 
teteguall a trra De camaram a terra De demaa a terra De tidumar a 
terra de Japara a terra De Ramee aterra De tobam a terra de cedayo a 
terra dagacij a terra de curubaya A terra De gamda a terra de bulam- 
buam a terra De pajarucam a terra de camta a terra De panarunca a 
terra de chamdy & ysto acabado falarsea da gramde ylha De madura// 

O Regno De fumda segumdo alguus afirman toma a metade de 
toda a Jlha De Jaoa outs ro a que mais autoridade se daa dizem que o 
Regno de cumda sera a parte terfeira Da Jlha E mais huu oytavo 
dizem que teraa a ylha de 9umda em Roda trezemtas leguoas tremj- 
nase cumda polio Rijo chemano Dizem que ds hordenou. Des os 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 413 

prymeiros tempos a ylha De Jaaoa Da de ?umda E a de cumda a De 
Jaaoa polio Dito Rijo o qll Rijo tem arvores de huu cabo & do out 10 
& afirmam que as aruores de cada bamda se encosta a cada terra com 
as Ramas no chaoo semdo aruores gramdes & de fremosa altura// : 

O Rey de cumda he Jemtio & todollos S res De seu Regno hee Fol. 147V. 
cumda de Jemte caualeyrosa guerreira no maar Dizem que tamtos por ^ ^ 
tamtos mais que os Jaaos sam homes De boos corpos homees ba?os Jemte da 
Robustos o f° Do Rey herda o Regno E quamdo nam ha f° ligitimo C umda - 
he por eileycam Do gramdes Do Regno custumase em cumda qmdo 
ho Rey morre qeymarense suas molheres & fidallguos seus & asy 
qmdo qll qr Dhy pa baixo morre e sua casa tambem se faz out 10 
tamto E ysto se querem nom p° q pa iso as molheres seja comuertidas 
por p as a morere somemte as q De seu moto qerem & as q nam sam 
beguynas seguem apartada Vida E nam casam dellas/ out a s casam 
tres quoatr 0 vezes sam estas poucas estranhas na terra// 

Tem a terra De £umda atee quoatro mjll cavallos que lhe vem de 
piramam E out a s ylhas a vemder tem atee quoremta alifamtes estes 
pa o aReo Do rrey hee o Regnno De cumda Regido em Justi^a sam 
homes verdadeiros fazem em sua terra boa companhia aos mercadores 
os das beiras do maar. Sam domesticos a mercadaria esta gemte de 
9umda mujtas vezes vem ha malaq a fazer mercadaria trazem lamcharas 
De cargua navijos de cemto he cimqoemta tonees tem 9umda ate sejs 
Juncos & das lancharas m tas ao vso De cumda trazemdo Mastos como 
cabrja (?) & antre huu & o out™ escadas E he asij gemtill navegar // 

Despois Do Rey de cumda q se chama Samg briamg E o seu viso 
Rey q se chama cocunam E despois o seu bemdara q na terra se chama 
macobumj Despois sam os S r es capitaees De cidades & lugares & 
portos asy como em Jada os Sres se chama pates chamamse em lingu- 
aje de 9umda paybou. .s. foam paibou de tall luguar por que a limgu- 
oagem de cumda. nom hee a de Jaoa nem a de Jaoa De 9unda posto q 
he huua soo Jlha a quail Devide o Rijo chemano a lugares mujto 
estreito porem a terra he Junta & tudo he huua ylha E tem o dito 
apartamemto que a corta he trespasa q ficam em Duas mas ysto vera 
quern estever na terra por q as arvores Dos estremos a lugares tocam 
os Ramos de huuas a out a s// 



4H 


TOMIS PIRES 


(idade 
homde o 
Rey 
estaa 


Merca- 
dorias do 
Regno de 
cumda 

Fol. i 48 r. 


mamti- 

memtos 


merca- 
dorias que 
valient No 
Regno De 
cumda//. 


A cidade homde o Rey estaa ho mais tempo do anno he a gramde 
9 idade de dayo tern a cidade as casas dolla & madeira bem obradas 
dizem que a casa do Rey he de trezemtos E trinta esteos De pao da 
grosura de huu tonell he Daltura De cimqo bracas cada huu De 
fremoso Emmadeiram t0 sobre os esteos E muyto bem obrada casa. 
esta cidade esta do porto pincipall q se chama calap a dous dias 
Damdadura ho Rey he gramde ca9ador & momteiro tern sua terra 
9ervos sem comto porquos touros Sam dados a ysto ho mais Do 
tempo tern o Rey duas molheres prim9ipaees de seu Regno E mamce- 
bas atee mill a Jente De cumda dizem ser verdadeira/ /. 

Tern pimemta melhor que a de cochim alguua cousa atee mjll 
bahares cadano tem pimemta lomgua mujta tern tamarimdos pa 
carreguar mjll naaos tem por primcipaes mercadarias Espauos & 
espauas que sam de sua terra | E out°s que trazem Das Jlhas De diva 
porque de 9unda aas Jlhas De diua vam e seis sete dias tem por 
primcipall mercadoria aRoz 9umda tem tambem ouro de toque Doyto 
mates tem mujtos panos a sua guisa. baixos que tambem vem a 
malaqua 

Tem aRoz que 9umda pode vemdr cadano atee Dez Juncos legumes 
sem medyDa tem carnes sem comto porcos cabras carneiros vacas 
em gramde camtidade tem vinhos tem fruytas he tarn abastada como 
ha Jaaoa E de cumda vam vemder aRoz E mamtimemtos mujtas 
vezes a Jaoa E De malaca vam a gumda cada huu anno Duas tres 
Jumcos por espauos aRoz & pimemta/ De 9umda Vem pamga- 
Jauas a malaq a com as ditas mercadarias E Retornam pa cumda o 
segujmt e*//. 

Vallem synabafos bramcos gramdes E pequenos synhavas pacha- 
uelezes balachos atobala9hos/ sam estes panos bramcos/. vallem panos 
qujlis emrrolados de ladrylho gramde E pequeno que lloguo sam da 
vallya E compram mujtos val pucho ca9ho alepivry & sememtes De 
cambay a valem bretamgis & Roupa de cambay a turias tiricamdies 
caydes & disto mujto & de toda a out a Roupa de cambay a em gramde 
maneira gasta se llaa m ta della E compraua por ouro// vail em cumda 
arequa auga Rosada E cousas destas//. 

por moeda meuda caixas Da china sam como 9eitijs furados polio 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


mey° pa se Emfiarem de 9emto em gento valem cada mjll vinte cimq° / moeda de 
Calais de malaq a por moeda grosa corre ouro da terra De toque doyto ( umda 
mates q vail a tumdaya que sam qujnze oytavas bem peasadas tre- 
zemtos Calais q sa nove cz dos & 

O Regnno De (jaimda tern seus portos o primeiro he o porto de PortosDe 
bautan neste porto amcoram Juncos he de trato tern boa ?idade no 
Rjo tern capitam a ?idade pesoa mujto homrrado trata este porto com 
as Jlhas De diua com a terra de comotora Da bamda de pamchur he 
este porto easy dos pmcipaes De todos tern Rijo Jumto a o mar tern 
mujto aRoz E mamtimemtos & p ta // 

O segumdo porto' do dito Regnno De 9umda camjnhamdo pa o porto de 
Japara he pondang que he Ja menos porto que bautan/ tem gramde P omda S 
pouoa9am tratam neste porto os que tratam com os de 9ima este 
porto he em Rijo Jumto com ho mar dize q amcora demtro Juncos & 
que he porto De trato tem aRoz mamtimetos pym ta // 

Ho terceiro he o porto de chigujde asy polio camjnho que he dito o porto de 
este porto tambem tem pouoacam E boa tratam nelle os que avemos cfie 8 u Jd e 
dito he piramam E amdallos E tulumbaua E ca9apom E out°s lugares 
amcora nelle Juncos tem capitam homrrado tem aRoz legumes pim ta 
muytos m tos 

Ho quarto porto he o de tamgara he porto como hos sobreditos o porto de 
tem boa pouoacam E trato tem capitam he lugar de trato como cada tam & ara 
huu dos sobreditos tem as cousas que os out°s tem//. 

Ho porto de calapa Este he magnifiq 0 porto he o pmcipal E melhor Fol. 148V. 
que todos este he omde o trato he moor E domde nauegam todos os Ho p orto 
De 9omotora E palimbao laue tamjompura malaq a maca9ar Jaaoa E de calapa 
madura E out°s lugares muj tos E tambem Estas na9oees tratam nos 
out°s portos este porto estaa dous dias damdadura Da cidade de dayo 
homDe o Rey estaa sempe dasemto asy que este he o de que se hade 
fazer fumdamemto estaa easy apeguado com a terra da Jaaoa som te 
se mete no meyo chemano & De chemano a este he huu dia E huua 
noyte com bom vemto aquj a este porto acodem as mercadarias De 
todo ho Regno hee este porto De boa hordenam9a tem Juizes Just a s 
espiuaes Dizem q por espto tem Ja quern fezer taall avera tall por ley 
do Regnno amquora neste porto muytos Juncos // 



Ho porto 
de 

chemano 


416 TOM ^ PIRES 

Ho porto de chemano he o seisto porto este nom he porto q nelle 
amcore Junq 08 Demtro somemte na barra segumdo dizem out°s 
Dizem q sy neste viuem mujtos nouros ho capitam he gemtlo he do 
Rey de 5umda aquj se fez o estremo Do Regnno he chemano de boo 
trato trata a Jaoa tambem com elle he de boa pouoacam gramde/ 

Estes Sres capitaees Destes portos sam pesoas muj t0 pin^ipaees he 
cada huu mujto temido & gramdememte Reverem9iado dos morado- 
res dos taes lugares sam gramdes momteiros amdam o mais do tempo 
em prazeres tern cavallos bem ajaezados estes compitem gramde 
memte com os Jaaos & os Jaaos com estes dizem que a Jemte de 
9umda he mais valente q ha de Jaoa Estes sam boos homees & verda- 
deiros E os Jaaos sam diabolicos he ousados em trei9oees E tern 
vaydade Doufanja do nome de serem Jaos 

Hos De cumda E de Jaoa nom sam amiguos nem Jmiguos cada huu 
garda o seu tratam huus com outros & tambem se se acham no maar 
cosairos qem mais pode comete E asy se vsa ca / por mais amizade que 
aja antre elles E mais paremtesquo//. 

He Regnuo De cumda nom comsemte mouros em sy somemte 
poucos p° q se temem que por suas manhas nom se fara e elle o que 
hee feyto em Jaoa porq hos mouros sam manhosos & por manha se 
asenhoream das terras porque poder nom tern Descubertamemte/. 
acabase o Regno De cumda aguora Emtraremos no Regnno Da 
Jaaoa & dela se contara o q tenho semtido / /. 

Ylha de Jaaoa ARedor comecando de choroboam Atee bulambuam 
& primeiro se falara do Rey Jentio Do sertao & do seu capitam moor 
guste pate he despois Dos pates mouros Das beiras do maar por 
hordem 

A Jlha de Jaaoa Amtigamemte Dizem que senhoreou atee maluco 
da banda Do leuamte E gramde parte Do ponemte E que teue de- 
baixo de sua obydiecia easy a Jlha De 9omotora E todallas Jlhas sa- 
bidas aos Jaos E que tudo ysto tiuerom Desde gramde tempo atee 
obra De cem annos a esta prte se comecou a demenujr seu senhorio 
atee o poor no estado que aguora hee como se adiante dira //. 

polio quail poder E mujta valia que a Jaa 5 a tinha E por navegar ha 
m tas partes E muyto lomgue porque se afirmam q nauegava atee adem 







PLATE XXXVIII 



ijgfli 

m 






*r\ 






PORTUGUESE TEXT 


417 

& q seu trato primcfpall era na bonua qlim & bemgalla pa9ee e que de 
todo tinha | o trato em peso neste tempo todollos navegantes eram Fol . 1 49 
Jemtios de maneria que acolheo asy nas beiras Do maar mercadores 
tam gramdes & de tam gramde trato q se nao sabia em partida aver 
tarn groso E de tamta fazemda// delies eram chijs delies arabios parses 
guzarates bemgallas & de mujtas na9oees & forom em tanto crecim t0 
q mafamede E os seus sagazes Detremjnarom Dempremder suas sey- 
tas nas beiras Do maar na Jaoa com fazemdas//. 

A Jlha da Jaoa he gramde terra em rroda quoatrocemtas leguoas terra Da 
comecamdo de chemano E cercamdoa pola bamda de bulambuam 2 aaSa 
tornamdo pola outra bamda a outr 0 estremo nom falaremos nas 
beiras Do maar somemte aguora do sertao/ he terra bem asombrada 
nam alaguad^a mais Da fey9am de purtuguall/ E muyto sadia/. 

He o Rey da Jaoa Jemtio chamase batara vojy aya estes Rex da 
Jaoa sam de gramde famtesya tern que sua fidalguja nom tern par sam 
grandes galamtes os Sres Jaaos gemtios sam de gramdes atabios De 
suas pesoas & de gramdes Jaezes De cavallos sam de cryses espadas 
lamcas De muj tas maneiras todas lavradas de tauxias douro sam 
gramdes momteiros cavalgadores estribos todos de tauxia Douro selas 
marchetadas nam tem o mundo em nada sam tam Sres tam Emleva- 
dos em Sres Jaos que certo nom ha na9om que a elles se posa com- 
parar Em gramdes partidas nestas parts por Jemtilez 3, amdam trosqa- 
dos ha m a trosquia E sempre correm a mao polos cabellos Da testa pa 
cyma he na como nos & disto se prezam muyto//. 

Sam os Sres Da JaaSa tam Reueremceados como deoses de gramdes 
acatamemtos E de gramdes 9umbayas hee a terra Da JaaSa Demtro 
mujto pouoada de muj tas cyDades E muyto gramdes amtre as quaes 
he a gramde cidade de dayo homde o Rey Estaa dasemto E aly he a 
sua corte Dizem que hee sem numero a Jemte q anda na corte os 
Rejs nom se mostram ao pouoo somemte huua vez duas no anno 
Estam em seus paacos como os Reis De cochim na cova E aly estam 
com todos os prazere^& com festas com gramde copia De molheres 
suas E mancebas dizem que pa seruj90 destas molheres tem o Rey da 
JaaSa mjll homees capados E estes amdam vestidos como molheres 
E tem os cabellSs como diademas Da propia feicam //. 


N 


H.C.S. II. 



TOM li PIRES 


418 


Guste 

pate 


Fol. 149V. 


amocos 


Costume 
na morte 
dos Jaaos 


E porque os Jaa5s comfiados em suas p as E dados a esta vida tem 
perdida grade parte de suas terras os Rex nom mamdam nem sam 
avidos somemte o seu visoRey E capitam mor que cada huu tem E 0 
que aguora Reje a Jaoa he guste pate seu visoRey E seu capitam moor 
Este he conhe^do E acatado por Rey a este obede?em todos os Sres 
Da Ja5a a este acatam este g dor mamda em tudo Este tem o Rey da 
Jaaoa De sua maao Este lhe manda dar de comer o Rey nom emtemde 
em nada nem lhe compre// aos Jaaos nom lhe apomtes a a maao Do 
Jmbiguo pa £yma nem afenes chegarlhe com a maao ha cabe?a por 
ysto matam //. 

chamase o viso Rey da Jaaoa E seu capitam mor guste pate amtes se 
chamava pate amdura. Este he o que mamda toda a Jaoa nos lugares 
& terras dos Jemtios E outrem nengue nam/ he guste pate sogro do 
Rey da Jaoa este guste pate he omem Caualeiro anda senpe na 
guerra tem sempe guerra com os mouros Das beiras Do maar pmci- 
pall memte com ho sor de dema qndo vay a guerra dizem que leuara 
Duzemtos mjll homees de peleja dos qees seram dous mjll de ca- 
vallo E espimgardeiros quoat ro mjll ysto me contou o Rey de tubam 
& porque sam gramdes amiguos & o sr de tubao he seu serujdor 
acrecemtara em seu estado sam os Jaos cacadores tem librees m tos & 
fremosos de coleiras E arganees douro & de prata//. 

Sam os Jaaos homees que se espeuem huua vez atee nom averem 
Reposta nom escrevem outra posto que mujto lhes Releue E ysto em 
enbaixadas & cousas semelhamtes sam hos Jaos homees ousados & 
detremjnam a morrer sam tafujs Jugadores Jogam gramde memte a 
sua arte e emtamto que aas vezes fjcam os fs° no Jogo//. 

Amtre as Nacoes Nom ha homees amoqos como a dos Jaaos 
amoquos quer dizer homees detremjnados a morrer delles o fazem 
Despois De tornados do vinho E ysto he a Jemte baixa porem os 
fidallguos tem Desafios E custumanse gramdememte amtre elles E 
morrem por cousas De suas Deferem9as he asy custume da terra/ 
Delles se matam a cauallo E delles a pee segumdo seu comcerto // 

He custume da Jaoa e das terras que despois Diremos que quamdo 
se o Rey fyna mujtas de suas molheres E mamfebas as pmcipaes se 
queymam & allguua Jemte do Rey E asy se faz quamdo os Sres morre 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


419 

E quallquer out 0 omem homrrado ysto he amtre os Jemtios E nam 
amtre os Jaos que sam mouros he as molheres que se nam queymam 
afogamse por sua vomtade com tamjeres he festas E as mais pm^paees 
molheres E omees como sam fidallgos quamdo seus maridos morrem 
morrem aas crisadas E asy o fazem os fidallguos que querem morrer 
com ho Rey a Jemte mais baixa se afogua no mar ou se queyma //. 

Tapas quer dizer ouservamtes como begujnos sam em Jaoa Destes tapasDa 

obra de cimqoemta mjll Sam amtre elles tres ou quoatro hordes huus ^ a5a 

Nam Comem aRoz nam bebem vynho Sam todos virgees nom conhe- 

9em molheres trazem na cabe^a huu £erto trajo que sera De huua 

gramde bra?ada E na pomta Revira como baguo E tern no emcaixa- 

memto Da cabe9a cimquo estrellas bramcas E a tall Emuemcam he 

Da maneira dos panos Das plnelras pretas & estes sam adorados 

tambem dos mouros E crem gramde mente nelles Dam lhe esmollas 

folguam dos taees virem a suas casas nom comem em casa De nen- 

guem senom no campo amdam dous E dous por hordenan9a e tres E 

na amdam soos na quellas Mitras nom lhe toquam Dizem que sam 

sagrados Eu vy na Jaaoa Destes p vezes Dez ou doze//. 

Muitas molheres Jaoas nam casam E virgees tem casas Nos momtes costume 

E alij acabam suas vidas outras despois que perdem hos pmeiros 

maridos se fazem begujnas as que se nom querem queimar E destas vamcia 

Dizem q ha na Ja5a gramde numero que seram mais de cem mill dasm0 ~ 

J Iheres 

molheres E despois fazem a vida casta memte E morrem niso & tem Jadasll. 
casas em lugares pa o taall apartamemto E asy as molheres como hos 
homees pedem de comer p amor de 5s// 

A terra Da Jaoa he de momos & de caratulas De diuersas fei9oees momos 
E asy o sam molhers como homees sam damtremeses De damcas Da J a5a 
Destorias comtrafazem trazem vestidos De momos E todos seus 
trajos/ sem duujda sam graciosos tem musyca de synos tarn Jem como 
orgaoos o som de todos de todas vezes// estes momos de dia E de 
noyte Sam De mjll gimtilezas a estas semelhamtes/ De noyte fazem 
sombras de Diversas feicoees como beneditos em purtuguall//. 

tem os Ja5s bois destado anafados como ginetes de cornos laurados boys da 
E casqos E estes trazem Dous em carreta E armada sobre a carreta J aa5a 
camaras De fremosa macanaria De marfijs/ & dout°s paoos E alij 



420 


T0M]£ pires 


paseam quamdo querem sam os bois ensijnados propia memte como 
cavallos E amdam com a cornadura pa diamte do teatro E amdam 
Recamdo E ysto he trajo limpo E parece muj t0 gra5ioso E he 
cousa destado E as mercadarias todas se trazem em carretas de bois 
por toda a Jlha de Ja5a 

/F°l. Custumase gramdememte na Jaoa capados amdam vestidos ao 

trajo das molheres trazem os cabellos por cima De meio Da cabe?a 
Capados De maneira De diadema estes servem da guarda das molheres por 
Da Jaoa q Ue os j aaos sam homees mujto 9iosos E nemgem nom lhe vee as 
molheres send a Jemte baixa./ mas todo fidallguo caualeiro homem 
Riquo gardase de serem vistas suas molheres De nengue E sobre isto 
sam mais promptos a morrer que sobre tudo esta a terra em ysto tam 
abituada que nam perdem nada De seu costume E ysto gardam 
Jnt a mete 


Costume Qmdo o Rey hade sair he lamcado pregam na 9idade que o Rey vay 

d J<m5a da f°^S uar ou ca 9 ar tQ do fyDallguo De quail quer estado E comd^am 

quamdo nom saie de casa nem nenhuu homem omrrado / o Rey saie com dous 

f ora a tres mill homes De lam9as daluados Douro E de prata estes vam di- 
follguar 

com suas amt e Emtam suas Man9ebas em carrds E postas por muj fresca 
molheres 1 1 maneira E ellas muy bem ataviadas/ E despois suas molheres em 
alifamtes adornados ha maneira de veiros E cada huua das mancebas 


E molheres leuam detras sy a pee vimte trimta molheres cada huua 

segumdo hee// E detras ho Rey com seu guste pate vam paseamdo E 

levam librees E galguos E out°s quaees levam lancas De ca9a de tres 

pomtas De fremosas tauxias o que se acha na Rua por homde o Rey 

hade hir ou vijr morre por iso posto que seja quern quiser nom 

semdo molher ou 1x1090 de ydade atee Dez annos // 

Desta propia maneira saem os Sres Da Jaoa os que ssam Sres e suas 

terras sopenna De morte/ o dia que vay a ca9a nom tem menos aca- 

tamemto em sua terra que o Rey na sua asy matam como se fosem 

Reis este he o costume da Jaoa ouvy ysto em tubam Desta propia 

horde- mane i ra Nam somemte do sor De tubam mas este estado tem seu 
tiampa Da 

Jaoa Jenrro que herda tubam por sua morte E asy vy em 9edaio/ / 

acerq todo homem da Jaoa ora seja Riquo ou pobre ade teer em sua casa 

dosmora- 

dores cris he lamca he adarga nom sam todas adarguas de pao Redomdas// 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


421 


E nemhuu omem de Jdade De Doze annos atee oitemta nam hade 
sair de casa sem cris na cimta trazeno nas costas como se custuma- 


vam hos punhaees em purtugall porq as armas valem baratas em Jaoa 
E a terra estaa neste custume// 

Aos pates se faz a Reverem?ia e cortesia Delatrla as maaos em Maneira 
9 ima Da cabe?a os seus naturaees/ E huus a out°s poem a mao Dereita 
nos peitos & qmdo falam cruzam as ma5s & ysto a Jemte baixa com os de Jaoa 
Sres E falam de lomge obra de quoatro cimquo pasadas E as mais 
vezes por tergelras pesoas porq este he o cortesao costume aos fidal- 
guos falarlhe por terceira p a qmdo esta acompanhado as cortesyas Do 
sertao Da Jlha De Ja5a Da corte Do Rey eu as nam vy/ nas beiras Do 
maar nas terras dos mouros vy/ Estes pates mouros como se Despois 
dira sam gramdes Sres E quamdo falam e cortesyas E Jemtilezas 
Dizem que na corte he tudo E rriquezas// E falam com gramde acata- 
memto nas cousas Do guste pate 

Dizem que os Jaos Ja tluerom Amtigamemte afenjdade com os 
chijs E que huu Rey da china mamdou a Jaoa huua sua f a pa casar 
com batara Raja $uda/ E que a mamdou a Ja5a com mujta gemte da 
china E que lloguo mamdou a moeda das caixas q ora corre E dizem 
que era huu Junco Delas carregado E que aquelle Rey era vasallo Do 
Rey Da china nam trebutario E que os Jaos matarom os chijs todos e 
Jaoa por trei^am outs 0 Dizem que nom foy taall mas q nunca teue 
paremtesco nem conhecim to huu com out ro Rey E que as caixas Da 
Jaoa traziam chijs a Jaoa por mercadorla poq Ja amtes De malaq a ser 
tratavam os chijs na Jaoa aguora De cem annos a esta pte nunca la 
forom//. 

Tres portos sam os que obede 9 em ao dlto Rey huu he de mouros & Fol. 150V. 
o out ro de Jemtios E o out 0 he huu f° De guste pate .s. tubam que he Portos 
daria tima de Raja este he de mouro vasallo obyDiemte ao dito Rey que 
E outro he bulambuam que he de pate pimtor E o outro he gamda que 
hee Do filho De gustepate-//. Jaada E a 

Tern a terra Da Jaoa somemte a dos Jemtios aRoz sem comto de seu 8 mte 


quoatro cimq° man ras hee mujto alluo melhor que de nenhuua pte 
out 3, tern bois vacas carneiros cabras bufaros sem numero/ certa- 
memte porquos toda a terra he chea tem mujtos veados & de gramde 


merca- 
dorias da 
Jaoa E 
mantim to * 



TOM ^ PIRES 


422 


merca- 
dorias q 
vallem na 
Jaoa E 
vam De 
malaquaj. 


moeda E 
pesos Da 
Jaoa 


gramDura fruitas mujtas pescados nas beiras do maar muj t0 he terra 
mujto abastada mais q nenhuua que qua se saiba he terra De fremo- 
sos ares tem aguoas mujto boas tem gramdes serranjas gramdes 
chapas vales terra como a nosa he a Jemte mujto nedea E luzida sem 
borbulha. De boos corpos como a tall terra Requere sam homees 
nam pretos mas sobre aluSs que sobre pretos E asy como nos afaga- 
mos os cabellos pa baixo asy o fazem elles ao Reues por gemtileza ysto 
nom he deste capitollo mujto a preposyto // tem mais a Jaoa vinhos a 
sua guisa gostosos E muj tos azeytes nom tem mamteigas ne qeyjo 
nom o sabem fazer//: 

Tem a Ja5a ouro em boa camtidade De toque doito mates E oyto 
& meio tem m tos estopazios tem cubebas atee vimte trimta bahares 
cadano E nom nas ha em out a pte tem pimemta lomga tem tamarjm- 
d5s pa carreguar mjll naaos os matos sam de muj boa cana fistola tem 
cardamomo nom muj * 0 aRoz que he a pmcipall mercadoria legumes 
espauos por mercadaria tem Jmfinjdade De panos Jaos que traze a 
vemder a malaqua ha mais Na Jaoa mjna destopafios tem synos de 
cobre he fruseleira que abastam a estas partes hee gramde mercado- 
ria/ 

Todo panno De cambaya E qmtas mercadarias Della vem a malaq a 
todas valem em ha Jaoa pannos qlijs emRollados De ladrilho gramde 
E pequeno taforio topitis E douts a sortes De pannos De bemgalla 
synabafos De todas sortes curados he cruus E de todas sortes out a s 
De maneira que se deue notar qmtos se gastaram Em tarn gramde 
pouo E todos estese Repaira De malaca E alguua cousa pouca alcam- 
9 am por vija De pamchur alguua ora mas nom he nada he vale mujto 
Rabos De bois vaquas bramcos q vem de bemgalla E do guzarate//. 

A moeda da Ja5a sam caixas Da china vallem cada mjll vimte cimq 0 
Calais dos de cemto por tres cruzados o nome de mjll chamase puou 
E por mjll vos dam menos trymta que asy he custume Da terra tiram 
aquelles trimta de dereytos pa o senhorio Do tall lluguar E por estes se 
faz toda mercadoria a Jaoa no tem moeda douro nem de prata folguam 
mujto com nosa moeda pmcipalm te com a moeda dos purtugueses 
Dizem que a terra homde se tall faz q deue de ser como Jaoa//. 

A tumdaia ou taell da Jaoa he m5r a qarta pte que a de malaq a vail 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


423 


a tumdaya Douro doito mates doze mjll caixas q valem noue cz dos a 
Rezam de mjll & trezentos he trimta & tres E huu ter?o por huu cz d0 
trazemdo o ouro da Ja5a a malaqua ganhase em cada cimquo huu//. 

Pesam cada cemto E quoremta caixas huu aRatall dos nos5s de 
dezaseis oncas tem o cate Duzemtas E quoremta caixas de Jada por 
que o bahar de Jaoa tem Duzemtos cates E pesa quoremta E oito 
mjll caixas mas eu nom comprey senom polio q leuava //. 

A guanta de Jaoa do aRoz E legumes he mais pequena que a de 
malaq a vymte cimq 0 gantas De Jaaoa fazem vimte Em malaq a E 
destes pesos he medidas se falara geerall memte Em todallas ptes em 
out 0 liuro// nom se ganha easy nada nas mercadarias q de malaq a 
vam a Ja5a somemte nos Retomos se ganha bem//. 

Hos custumes dos drrtos que se paguam em Ja5a das mercadarias 
que a ella vam por maar o primcipall hee o direyto Damcoragem & 
por este se pagua presemte E da mercadaria que se vemde na terra se 
pagam De Drrtos de cada dez mjll caixas quoatrocemtas // : 

Ja tenho Dit5s senhores da Jlha aguora come?arey De comtar dos 
pates mouros q estam nas beiras Do maar os qees sam poderosos na 
Jaoa E tem todo ho trato p° q sam Sres Dos Jumcos & de gemtes// 

No tempo que JaaSa era de Jemtis Na beira do maar vinham 
muj tos mercadores parses arabios guzarates bemgallas malaios E 
douts a nacoees amtre os qees avia muj tos mouros comecaram tratar 
na terra E fazerse Riquos teuerom maneira de fazer mezqtas E 
vierom De fora parte moulanas De maneira que vierom em tamto 
crecim t0 que os fs° Destes taes mouros eram Ja Ja8s E Riquos que 
teuerom maneira como Dobra de setemta annos a esta parte em alguus 
lugares os propeos Sres Jaos JemtiSs se tornarom mouros E estes 
matauanSs E os mouros mercadores apoderavase Dos taees lugares 
outs 0 tinham maneira De fortale 9 er os lugares em q moravanv& 
tomavam gemte Da sua que em seus Juncos navegavam E matauam 
os Sres Jemtios E faziamse Sres & desta maneira se asenhoreava das 
beiras do mar E ficarom com o trato & poder Da Ja5a / /. 

Os quaes senhores pates Nam sam Jaos damtigujdade da terra 


merca- 


somemte de^emdem de chijs de parses E quelis & das na?oes que ja 
dixemos porem crados estes nas oufanjas Dosfjaaos E mais pollas 



TOME PIRES 


Choro • 
boam 1 


Fol. 151V. 

Terra De 
Japura 


424 

Riquezas que de seus amtef esores lhe ficarom tern mais a fidalguja & 
estado Jaoo Em peso que os de demtro E cada huu he Reueremciado 
em sua terra como se fose out a cousa mujto mor aguora se comecara 
a dizer de cada huu E de sua terra, as terras Destes estemdemse na 
terra atee as serranjas q seram sete ou oyto leguoas// 

Porque noso Recomtamemto vem drrta memte polla costa de 
cumda a emtrar nas trras De Jaoa atee chemano seg° he dito aguora 
tomarsea a falar de choroboam E acabaremos e bulambuam falamdo 
de cada huu o que he mouro E que Juncos he Jete tem E pmeira 
memte falaremos de choroboam//. 

A trra De choroboam he Jumto com cumda chamase o Sor della 
lebe v$a he vasallo De pate Rodim sor De dema este choroboam tem 
porto bom E nelle avera tres quoatro Juncos tem muj to aRoz E mujtos 
mantimemtos tera atee dez lancharas pequenas Dizem que aguora 
nom tem tamto / este lugar de choroboam tera atee mjll vizinhos neste 
lugar de choroboam mora pate qdir o que estava em vpe alevamtado 
avera em choroboam mercadores como pate qdir cinq 0 ou seis porem 
todos fazem homrra ao pate qdir E o sor de choroboam porque o tem 
p° mercador ousado & caualeiro este lugar de choroboam avera quo- 
remta amos q era de Jemtios E o sor De dema q emtam era tinha huu 
espauo dagacij & fez o Dito espauo por capitam comtra choroboam E 
tomou choroboam & o sdr de dema lhe deu o titollo De pate de cho- 
roboam E este seu espauo dagaci q foy sor de choroboam he avoo 
deste pate Rodim que oje he sor de demaa //. 

Este luguar de choroboam polio Rijo Demtro obra de tres leguoas 
emtram detro Jumcos segumdo dizem nom he cousa forte este lugar 
he de melhor madeira q nenhuu lugar Da Jaaoapa fazer jumcos posto 
que a Jaoa toda nom he de m ta madeira//. 

A terra De Japura comtermjna De huua parte com choroboam & 
da out a com a terra De locary he terra de dous mjll moradores em 
pouoa?oes he de pate Rodim/ chamase o pate de locary pate codia tem 
este luguar atee cimquo lamcharas tem dous Juncos tem muj° aRoz 
este lugar E ?era mell mamtimemtos a gemte de Japura sam lavra- 
dores he o pate Deste lugar cavaleiro pmo com Jrmao De pate Rodim 

1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘.Tsieribon (lie de Java)’. 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


425 

tem obidiemcia ao dito pate Rodim s5r de demaa estaa easy como 
capitao seu no dito luguar este lugar De Japura tomou ho pay Deste 
pate Rodim por manha e emtam ficoulhe na maao ate oje// tem p°to 
& vay p° Ryo a povacam / 

A terra De teteguall comfyna de huua pte com Japura & da out a Terra De 
com camaram tem este luguar mais aRoz q nenhuu lugar da Ja5a tete suall. 
Destes Das beiras do mar o pate deste lugar he huu tijo De pate onuz 
he da obidiemcia Do s5r de dema tem porto & Rijo homde carreguam 
De muj t0 aRoz E doutros mamtimemtos tem este huu Jumco E as 
vezes nom tem nada. tem lamcharas pequenas // a terra de teteguall 
dyzem que he terra de quoatro mjll viz os viuem em pouoacoees nom 
mujto Jumtas o lugar de teteguall terra obra De mjll E quinhemtos 
vizinhSs tem este lugar atee sete ou oyto mercadores//. 

Camaram Juntase de huu cabo com teteguall E do outro com a terra De 
aterra De demaa chamase o pate De camaram pate mamet hee sogro camaram 
de pate Rodim sor De dema he da obidiemcia De dema tem porto 
nom mujto boo tem aRoz E mamtimemtos tem este lugar tres Jumcos 
he quoatro ou cimq 0 lamcharas tem obra De tres mjll moradores/ 
aguora nom tem Jumco nem Jumca (?) he trra sem nehuua cousa pa 
poder naveguar porque os q tinha lhe queimarom em malaq a E nom 
tem poder pa fazer out°s segumdo todos dizem & 

A terra De dema comfina de huua pte com camaram E da out a com terra De 
a terra De tidana hee a terra De dema mor que as que sam ditas de demaa 
choroboam atee Demaa tem a cidade sua obra de oito atee dez mjll 
casas segumdo afirmam he s5r desta terra pate Rodim Este he o 
pmcipall pate, da Jaoa deste fazem cabeca todos os Sres da Jaoa os 
que sam Seus amiguos foy o pay de pate Rodim caualeiro p a de 
gramde syso & o dono de pate Rodim foy huu home dagacij huus 
Dizem q era espauo do sor De dema em cujo tempo elle veio teer a 
dema out°s dizem q era mercador / mais autoridade se daa este 
espauo//. 

Este pate Rodim he muij t0 aparemtado com os Sres da Jaoa por 
que sey pay & avoo tem mujtas fs a E todas as casou com os pates 
primeipaes/ tem este tamto poder que sojuguou toda a trra De pa- 

1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘Samarang (lie de Java).’ 



TOME PIRES 


Fol. I 52 r. 


terra De 
tidana 


426 

limbam E de Jamby E as Jlhas de menamby E mujtas out a s ylhas 
comtra tamjompura E todo trouxe a sua obidiem?ia// hee de gramde 
acatam t0 Este pate Rodim Das terras deste vem o arroz E out°s 
mamtimemtos a malaqua foy homem ho pay deste que de suas terras 
podera ajuntar quoremta Jumcos aguora nom ajuntara dez porque 
este pate Rodim fiquou mo 90 E aguora sera De Jdade de trimta annos 
E deuse a cousas de mamcebas E sua terra quebrou mujto Do que 
dantes era//. 

E mais o que lhe ficou todo lhe foy destruydo em malaq a qmdo 
pate onuz seu cunhado veyo pelejar na era De qnhentos E doze/ tem 
este mujta Jemte de peleja tera em Jaoa trimta mjll homees e em pa- 
limbao tera dez mjll este tem comtinoadamente guerra com ho 
gustepate & com o sor de tubam tem desp a mujta gemte na guerra 
he he pobre ee dema nom tem somemte cimq 0 ou seis pangajavas & 
nom tem Junquo nehuu & se este nom pede misericordia a malaqa de 
vasalajem pa se emparar E ssuas mercadorias tere furo sera de todo 
pdido porque por aver tres ou quoatro annos que nam trata | he 
gastado gramdememte asy que de necesydade lhe comue ser trebu- 
tario a malaqua pa sua Redemcam E o pouo Ja se vay De sua terra 
pa outras por nom aver trato de mercadorias// 

todas as Noujdades de suas terras este despendia em malaq a asy 
que elle mamdaua em seos Jumcos E pamgajavas como mercadores 
de malaq a em Juncos hiam a sua terra do qual trato avija gramdes 
copias de mercadorias elle a sua maao E tinha gramde proueito he 
porq Jsto nom faz aguora hee despeso E dizem q Despemdeo mais de 
cem mjll cz dos elle E pate onuz na armada que veio sobre malaca 
nom he duujda estar gastado p° q asy se afirma/ este nom tem vida 
se nom faz fumdamemto de malaq a // gastanse nas terras deste 
gramdes copias de mercadarias asy dos guzarates como dos qlijs E da 
china & bemgalla Das quaes aguora a terra he falecida pollas Rezoees 
que sam ditas// Dema tem Riq° Rijo nom emtram nelle JumcSs seno 
de mare ceha 

A terra De tidana detreminase de huua pte com dema E da outra 
com Japara este pate chamase pate orob / he tijo De pate onuz Jrmaao 
de seu pay Dizem q nam obedece a nemguem este he omem sesudo 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 427 

segundo dizem aguora nom tem Jumco tem duas ou tres pamgajavas 
tem Rijo bom nom emtram Juncos demtro tem esta terra muyto 
aRoz & mujtos mamtimentos terra a terra de tidana dous ou tres mjll 
homees E peleja este mujtas vezes com os do sertao E ajudao a 
gemte do pate Rodim porque o gustepate vem mujtas vezes sobre 
deiftaa E tidonam Japara E faz dano nos da terra Este dizem que 
guouerna o pate onuz E o pate Rodim por comselho & a elle hobede- 
cem como a paremte mas cada huu he mais poderoso que o dito pate 
orob //. 

Aguora somos emtrados Na terra De pate onuz ho caualeiro de terra de 
que os Jaoos falam p° q Dizem que he na Jaoa gramde homem de J a P ara - 
peleja E gramde sesudo E ouue mujta terra a sua maao este pate 
onuz/ seu avoo foy homem trabalhador Das Jlhas de lavee e esteue e 
malaq a com muj pouca fidallguia E menos fazemda e em malaq a 
casou E ouue of 0 que foy ho pay de pate onuz E em malaca foy 
avemdo dr° he trataua na Jaoa E avera obra de quoremta annos ou 
mais cimquo que por estu£ia matou o pate Japara que era cousa fraq a 
& pouca cousa de nouenta ou cem Vizinhos E asy tomou a terra De 
tidana Despois & por sua esUnpia foy taall q ha pouoou & house foy 
o mais nomeado sor da Jaoa em for^a e em boa companhia aos seus 
naturaes //. 

0 porto de Japara estaa ao pee do gramde momte E muj t0 alto 
que se chama \blank\ a terra de Japara comfina De huua bamda com 
tidona & da outra com a trra De Rame Japara he emseada de fermoso 
porto tem diamte do porto tres Jlhas como as Dup e E podem emtrar 
gramdes naaos Demtro os q nauegam pasando davamte Japara 
veem toda a pouoaca este he o mjlhor porto que atee quj avemos 
Dito E na melhor parajem todos os que querem hir a Jaoa E a 
maluq 0 vam dar comsiguo na terra de Japara he bem a sombrada 
terra/ foy huu home tam ousado que trouxe a sua Jurdi^ao a Jlha 
de bamq a E a de tamjompura he laue E out a s Jlhas E fez sua terra 
gramde teue Ja Japara muj tos Juncos & era easy tam grade s5r como 
o sor De dema/ he certo que por cavaleiro tem Japara & demais 
Jemte E demais terra dema E o f° pate onuz quis aj untar qmta 

1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘ -Japara (lie de Java).’ 



tom£ pires 


428 

fazemda fiquou de seu pay E quamta fazemda tinha pate Rodim E 
detremjnaua de tomar malaq 3 ao Rey que foy De malaq® por huu 
descomtemtamemto que tomou por nom fazerem em malaca homrra 
a huu capitam de huu Junq 0 seu como esperava// E neste meio tempo 
se ganhou malaca polio guoVrnador das Jmdias a 0 dallboquerq E 
quamdo ysto souberom Jumtos os moulanas & p as q avia pmcipaes// 
diserom q homde podia ser majs Justa sua Empresa que tomarem a 
Fol. 1 52V. cidade aos portugueses & este acordo acabarS | Sua Armada Em cinq 0 
annos com ajuda de palimbao E vierom sobre malaq a obra de cem 
vellas q a menos das 9ento nam seria de menos carga q naao de 
duzemtos tonees & forom Recebidos Davamte o porto De malaq a 
omde nom esteuerom amcorados mais que obra de seis oras amcora- 
ram ao primcipio Da noyte E a meia noyte com o terrenho se forom 
E tornarom obra de sete ou oyto a sua terra E as out a s ficarom quei- 
madas E alagadas E out a s tomadas morrerom obra De mjll homees 
E cativarom outs 0 tamtos// 

E ajmda o pate onuz no porto seu Japara nam estava seg r0 & 
dizia que os purtugueses se ouueram bramda memte com elle// E 
aguora amda a momtear/ hee pate onuz macebo De Jdade de vinte 
cimq 0 annos// em fidalguja e em presuncam mais q todollos Jaos Este 
estaa aguardamdo se lhe cometem paz/ hee certo q elles ha hade 
cometer polio q lhe compre aguora tem Jampara tres Juncos & duas 
ou tres pamgajavas tem sua terra mujto aRoz gastase em sua terra o 
que Ja Disemos da Jaoa he casado com huua Jrmaa De pate Rodim 
E pidia a ellRey q foy De malaq a huua f a em casam t0 E mamdou 
ebaixadores sobre yso //. 

He o porto de Japara ao pee De huua Serra muy t0 alta. E faz esta 
serra chapa de tres qoatr 0 leguoas E ao pee de huua chapa estaa 
Japara em terra chaa nom alagadifa mas muy boa E bem asombrada 
Dizem que tem fremosas carnes E mujtos pescados hee Japara 9erta- 
memte a pare9er chaue De toda a Jaoa por que Jaz na pomta he he 
meio De toda a Ja 5 a porque tamto ha dalij a choroboam como a 
aga9ij he lugar de m t0 trato por que he porto & dizem que 
dalij se espalhaua os mercadores aas out a s ptes nom falamdo em 
aga9ij //• 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 429 

A terra De rramee he apeguada de him cabo a Japara E do outro a Terra De 
terra De cajongam he por que cajongam he Destruida por guste pate ^ amee 
nom teue mais moradores Rame leuou Della E tubam asy que diremos 
q Da out a pte se ajunta a terra De tubam chamase o pate de Ramee 
pate morob este he tijo De pate onuz E pate onuz f° de sua Jrmaa 
Esta terra tem mujto aRoz E tem madeira pa JuncSs E alij se faziam 
antyguamente aguora Dizem q nom tem nenhuu he tera duas pan- 
gajavas porque acorreo a pate onuz e sua Detremjna5am comtra 
malaq a E cada huu perdeo o que meteo na armada//. 

Tem este guerra com os Da terra De demtro Dizem que he ome q 
tera e sua terra quoatro mjll homees sam lavradores viuem por suas 
Noujdades hee a terra Deste De gramdes baias he bem asombrada na 
terra Deste tem pate Rodim graDe peda5o de terra Da de cajomga 
tambem he o pate Rodim sobrinho deste alguua Desta terra he mato 
E nam hee aproueitada por causa que tubam vem sobre ella E destruia 
E asy o fazem out°s eu vy gramde peda90 desta terra De gramdes 
palmares & out a s aruores/ & sem moradores porq tambem se temem 
dos bajuus pola destruy^a da dita terra de cajamga fogirom // os 
mercadores que tem dr° vam fazer os Juncos a esta terra De Ramee//. 

A terra de tubam he de huua bamda chegada A terra cajongam E Tubam 1 
Ramee segundo A?ima hee dito// E Da out a parte com ?edayo E nas 
costas tem o emparo Do guste pate/ chamase o pate De tubam pate 
vira agora por homrra lhe Deu ho guste pate o nome danatimao De 
Raja que hee nome muj t0 omrrado tubam tem a sua villa hum Joguo 
De barreira de beesta do mar hee ?ercada de parede/ De ladrilho 
delle cozido delle cruu sera de dous palmos e larguo E em alto sera De 
qinze tem darredor dos muros da bamda De fora alaguoas dauga E da 
bamda da terra firme tem gramdes carapeteiros E syluados pegados 
ao muro & o muro amcado de bombardeiras & sete as E de demtro 
tem andaimos de pao ao andar dos muros/ esta tuba e terra chaa & | Fol. i53r. 
Sera tubam demtro da cerq a De mjll Vizinhos tem cada p a homrrada. 
seus cerquos De tigollo suas portas bem feitas E demtro as cassas Dos 
seus segumdo o que tem cada huu// a huu tiro De bombarda grosa da 
terra amcoraes em duas bracas & tres E quatro E a tiro de ber90 sera 
1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘ Touban (lie de Java).’ 



TOM £ PIRES 


43 ° 

De huua bra$a E mea E na maree vazia tem esca^eo E quamdo vaza 
espraya a dous tres tiros de beesta E tem aguoa Docee De maree 
vazija E bem doce em fomtes E se metes os pees nom vemdo as covas 
atolaes atee o embiguo// asy he este sor de tubam obidiemte ao guste 
pate E este he o mais perto porto da cidade de daya homde he o 
asemto do guste pate E sam asy comcertados q ho guste pate lhe 
socorre com dez vinte mjll homees aquamdo vem Jmiguos sobre 
tubam porque todos os pates da Jaoa mouros lhe querem mall por ser 
amiguo do cafre sam os homes de tubam cavaleiros mais q todSs os da 
Jaoa/ nemhuu sor Da Ja5a tem amjzade com elle por ter sua villa forte 
E maao desembarcadoiro & ser liado a ho guste pate nom teme 
nengue E De todos tem ho melhor.//. 

Este por ser acheguado E amiguo Do guste pate tem as cousas Ricas 
de tauxias em suas terras tem os crises lamsas de mujtas maneiras 
tem armas de ca<ja de tres pomtas tem ginetes guarnjmemtos tem 
alifamtes tres tem mjll lebres de ca?a outs° De busqua tem Dozemtas 
molheres mam^ebas ssuas tem Riquas casas & bem obradas homde 
mora cavalga cada dia polla menhaa Em carros de gramdes mafana- 
rias a muj t0 limda maneira pa trra nam saye como se em?arra se nom 
bem tarde as vezes cavallga e alifamtes out a s vezes em cavallos estaa 
tres dias na villa E outs 0 tamtos fora a momtear a terra he bem 
asombrada De mujto aRoz q vem de demtro da terra firme he de 
mujtas maneiras De mujto vinho E mujto pescado & de boa aguoa’//. 

tem mujtos tamarimdos Muj ta pimemta lomga alij vem teer as 
cubebas/ Carnes de vaquas porquos cabritos/ cabras veados galinhas 
fruitas sem comto De tudo ysto he abastada terra E mostrase gramde 
serujdor dellRey noso s5r// os seus lhe falam de mujto lonje a nos 
abracanos E tem esperamga que sera com sua Vrdade & boa mais 
pincipal na Jaoa sera homem De cimqoemta E cimquo annos atee 
sesemta/ este he Jao de na?a seu avo era Jemtio E depois foy mouro 
este nom me pare^e muj t0 emcamado e mafamede// 

o qerda a terra p sua morte he f° de huua sua Jrmaa E casado com 
huua sua filha este me nom pareceo tam bem como o sor velho De 
tubam/ ha cidade de daha Jram em dous Dias a bom amdar terra De 
carretas boa bem asombrada. como a nosa nom allagadifa camjnhos 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


43 1 


mujto pouoados tem Demtro na villa gemtios viuem e bairo sobre sy 
hee a terra bem pouoada de Jemte E de casas homrradas tem tubam 
mujtos cavaleiros Eu vy em tubam huu gemtio q veio da corte hy a 
vernos Diziam q era homem fidallguo trazija tres glnetes de Jemtijs 
garnjmetos Destribos todos de tauxias De pannos todos bamdados 
Douro Ricamemte atabiado De fermosos guarnjmemtos trazija 
comsiguo atee Dez homees de Ricas lam9as era Robusto gramde 
lemtijoso os cabellos Refoufinhados pa ?ima emcrespados E todos lhe 
faziam Reuerem?ia E nam veio senom a ver que homees eramos & 
pousava fora da villa E nom saya senom huua vez no dia comtra a 
tarde E eu faley muytas vezes com elle/ ho sor de tubam pratiqua 
mujtas vezes q elle foy o que primeiro aceptou E mamteue amizade 
dos portugueses he diz q nam quer out a cousa pa lembram9a de seus 
fs °l hee bom home E sua amizade fiell E mere9e mer9ee sempre 
certam te // Sera tubam De seis ou sete mjll homes De peleja 
ajuntamdose toda sua terra nom tem Junco nem pangajavas de 
Cargua suas// 

A terra De 9edayo De huua pte peguase com a terra de tubam E da terra de 
out ra com a terra Daga9ij chamase o sor de cedayo pate amiza he f e ^ a y°- 
sobrinho De pate morob sor De Rame E he pmo com Jrmao De pate 
onuz E pmo segumdo de pate Rodim Este he omem mamcebo De 
Jdade De vinte annos he casado com a f a do s5r Dagaci tem comsyguo 
huu Jrmao de seu pay q se chama pate bagus eu faley muj tas vezes 
com estes em 9edayo este pate bagus Reje a trra ho mancebo anda 
com suas mamcebas a momtear/ /. 

9edayo nom he terra De mercadoria he menos que tubam tem sua Fol. 153V. 
Vila 9ercada de muro como tubam he cousa pobre de pouca Jemte tem 
homes homrrados q viue por suas novidades sera homem De dous 
mjll vasallos Defemdem sua terra/ he em costa mao desembarq ar tudo 
pedras tem aRoz E mamtimetos nom tem Jumco ne pamgajavas 
dizem que dent 0 hee sua terra boa/ hee a Jemte de cedayo mais 
Rustica q nenhua Das q ate q 1 sam ditas E he a terra gramde parte de 
Jemtios Este estaa e amizade com ho sor De tubam 

Chegados somos agra9ij ho gramde porto de trato o melhor De Terra da - 
1 There follows in a much more recent hand: ‘Sidayo (lie de Java). ’ 



tom£ pires 


432 

toda a Jaoa omde os guzarates/ E calecut / bemgalas/ syames/ chijs/ 
lequjos / amtigamemte soyam naveguar esta hee a gema da Jaoa no 
porto da mercadoria Este he o porto Reall homde as naos estam 
amarradas seguras Dos vemtos com os garoupezes em cima das 
casas/ porto de mercadores se chama chamase amtre os Jaos o porto 
da Jemte Riq a / parte agacij com gedaio E da out a pte com curubay a 
E De fromte tern a gramde Jlha De madura a v ta //. 

Agraci bate ho maar nelle E tern duas pouoagoes as qees aparta huu 
Riacho peqno q de maree vazija fiqua qasy em sequo De huua das 
pouoacdes maior & de mais moradores he sor pate ?uf E da outra parte 
zeynall estes tern comtinoadamemte guerra E de huua parte nom 
vam a out a nem da out a a out a sopena de morte he as vezes tem tre- 
gnoas Em tempos de suas noujdades E no tempo que vem Juncos ao 
porto & despois fica em sua Jmizade a muj t0 tempo q dura ysto/ 0 
zeynall presume De cavaleiro o out ro tem mais gemte cada huu 
se defemde huu do out ro E viuem com vegias desta maneira pate 
cufuf he naturall malay 0 o dono de pate cu£uf chamase [blank] E 
seu f° chamase pate adem este pate adem veio fazer seu asemto a 
malaca tinha em malaq a suas casas E tratava de mercadoria casou e 
malaq a com huua malay a de que ouue pate cucuf & viueo o dito 
pate cu£uf muyto tempo em malaq a morto o dono foy pate ADem 
pa agarcij tomar pose De sua terra & dhy a gramde tempo mamdou 
chamar o filho a malaq a o quail se foy laa com sua casa toda / morto 
o pay q se chamaua pate adem fiquou o dito pate cu£uf e agarcij este 
tinha o trato de maluquo & bamdam amtigamemte e quamto teve 
Juncos a dona deste pate cucuf era Jrmaa De cerina de Raja pay 
do bemdara que aquj o Rey mandou Deguolar E ellRey que foy De 
malaq a era tambe neto deste bendar a pay do que matarom De maneira 
que pate cucuf he seg d0 com Jrmao do Rey q foy de malaq a // 

He este pate cucuf mercador E muyto dado ao trato da mercadaria 
tem muj tos mercadores em sua terra he homem de bom syso sera 
Didade De cimq°emta anos foy seu porto De mujtos juncos & de 
mujtas pangajavas de carregua aguora nom tem nada tem mujtos 
calaluzes E naviotes de salto asy como tem os out°s pates da Jaoa que 
todos tem gramde numero De calaluzes mas nom sam cousa pa se 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


433 

desabrigar Da terra sam lavrados de mjll feifoees De vultos de serpes 
& dourados sam darreo cada huu tem destes mujtos E mujto pimta- 
dos E certo parecem bem E feitos em mujto polida maneira E sam pa 
Rejs folgare nelles de seus Repartimemtos de Jemte baixa Remamse 
de Remos de maao/ devianse de vsar em purtuguall q estam destado // 
tera a terra dagarcij seis ou sete mjll homees em sua terra//. 

Gastamse na terra dagacij muj tos pannos de todas sortes e em 
gramde camtidade porque dagacij se gastam pa gramde parte de Ja5a 
& pa out a s Jlhas mujtas he por Rezam que tinha a navega^a de ma- 
luco E bamdam comprava elle & seus mercadores gramdes copias E 
faziamse gramdes tratos em aga^ij E por a destrujcam de malaca elles 
nom navegam nem trata ne te Junco porq a mor parte dos Juncos da 
Jaoa sam de peguu que os mandaua la fazer os Ja5s E out°s que 
compaua e malaq a porq os peguus trazem as mercadorias E os Juncos 
todo por mercadoria E acabado de vemder | as mercadorias vemdiam Fol. i 54 r. 
os Juncos E porque Jsto ha Ja cimq 0 annos que ^esou E o guouernador 
Das Jmdias queimou & desbaratou todos os Jumcos dos Jmigos fica- 
rom todos de 9 epados E nom tem Junquos//. 

E desta maneira que dito hee estaa a Ja5a soo & sem Juncos E os 
Sres q dantes Da destru^am tinham Junquos aguora estam sem elles 
E os que poderom Recolher trouxe pate onuz E por seu Desbarato 
nom tomou senom tres de maneira que nam tem toda a Jaoa E pa- 
limbam atee dez Juncos & dez pamgajauas de carregua que sam como 
navijos Jaoa hee mais de calaluzes he pamgajauas pequenas que de 
Juncos gramdes por que peguu fornegia todos De Juncos pedir pa?ee 
pahao & Jada E palimbam estes os mais sam de peguu// e Jaoa allguns 
se fazem mas sam poucos E estas compras as mais se faziam em ma- 
laq a / nom sam poderosos os Jaos pa em dez annos fazerem dez 
Junquos// 

Ja hee dito das cousas de pate cucuf sor da pincipall pouoacam da- 
gracij fiqua aguora pate Zeinall E porque sua terra he mais de suas 
noujdades E pelejam no sertao da Jlha com seus comtrairos nom hee 
cousa pa se nelle Despemder tempo por q no maar nom tem nenhuua 
cousa na terra Defemdese como seus vizinhos este pate zeynal Dizem 
os Jaos que he cavaleiro he mais velho que todollos pates da Jaoa. este 



TOME PIRES 


Terra De 
furubaia. 


Terras de 
gamda 


434 

he mujto aparemtado he tijo De pate amiza de 9edayo & de pate 
omuz & de pate Rodim o velho Jrmao em armas / E aguora De pate 
Rodim o f° tambem o hee/ hee de mujta fatasya E pobre este dise que 
quamdo o capitam moor fezese paz com o sor de dema q hos senhores 
da Jaoa a fariam por for9a easy dizemdo q no sor de dema estava toda 
a Jaoa 

A terra De 9urubaia de huua parte comfina com terras dagra9ij & 
da outra com terras de gada chamase o Sor De 9urubaya pate bubat 
E aguora lhe deu o guste pate o nome de Jurupa Galacam Jmteram 
quer dizer o avamtejado capitao Este he cavaleiro E muj to autorizada 
pesoa mais homrrado por armas que nemhuu Das beiras Do maar 
Jaaos mouros Dos que aguora sam vivos E neste estribam todollos 
Jaos De sua pessoa E conselho tern gramde terra E tern mujtas vezes 
guerra com ho guste pate E as vezes sa amiguos/ no mar tern mujtos 
calaluzes de guerra este he Jrmao em armas com o sor Dagra9ij Dizem 
que o dono Deste foy gemtio espauo Do avoo de guste pate out°s 
dizem q era seu avoo De 9umda fynall memte he mujto estimado 
terra em sua terra seis ou sete mjll homees De peleja //. 

Tern este comtinoadamemte guerra E nom he dado a out 10 eixerci- 
9io Deste Recebem comselho E ajuda os Jaoos seus vizinhos hee 
mujto aparemtado dos pates mouros tern gramde guerra com ho pate 
de bulambua que he Jemtio seu comtrairo os Jaos mamdam tambem 
ajuda a este quamdo o outro vem sobre elle porq o de bulanbua E 
gamda sam mais poderosos/ por causa deste sempre ter guerra hee 
muj t0 estymado // tern sua terra mamtimentos como as out a s da Jaoa 
porque toda a terra Da Jaoa os tern as mercadarias vam dagracij este 
deseja mujto que se fa9a amizade com malaq a E dizem que o trabalha 
mujto Este espeueo Ja a esta fortalez a he a elle Ja lhe espeuerom duas 
vezes hee este pate pobre sua terra nom tern Juncos ne pangajauas 
viue por suas noujdades como fazem out°s na Jaoa as vezes amdam 
seus capitaes a saltear polio maar// 

A terra de gamda hee gramde De huua pte ajuntase com curubaia 
E da out a com terras de canjtao panarucam pajurucam / chamase o 
pate de gamda pate sepetat hee gemtio f° do gramde gustepate da 
Ja 5 a ate quj chegaram os mouros Ja E forom lamcados fora polio 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


435 

guste pate E deu estas terras a huu seu f° Daquy por diamte nom ha 
mouros saluo em maluq 0 & os de bamdam hee a terra Deste muj t0 
abastada De mujta Jemte de guerra E peleja sempre com <purubay a 
Dizem que este f° do guste pate he caval r0 E p a homrrada por Rezam 
de seu pay E mujto estimado he casado com a f a de pate pijntor sor 
de bulambua he tambem he | casado com ha filha Do gramde sor De Fol. 154V. 
madura tern este muj ta Jemte de cavallo he m tos Sres da Jaoa Estam 
com ell e/ tern calaluzes no maar//. 

E este com ajuda do sogro ha gramde tempo que os mouros nom 
poderom passar de curubaia adiamte tern a terra Deste mujtos 
mamtimetos nam he terra de trato todos estes viue homrrada memte 
por suas noujdades E todos sam abastados De deleites & prazeres 
sera a terra De gamda De dez mjll homees/ / 

Estas tres terras nomeadamemte tinham senhores pates E srs Terras De 
muj t0 homrrados E De mujta autoridade/ Avera oito annos deles E C p^naru- 
outs 0 cimquo que sam destroydos he canjtam Junto com ganda E campa- 
canjtam com panarucam E panarucam com pajaruca E pajarucam 2 urucam l 
com bulambuam Estes pates faziam cabe^a de pate pular sor De 
canjtam E porque Dizem que queriam dar emtrada ao s5r de 
£urubaya Demtro forom estes tres pates mortos & suas terras to- 
madas pa o s5r De bulambuam E aguora nom tem pates E sam da 
Jurdiga de bulanbua he Dizem que cada huua Destas terras tres he 
tarn homrrada easy como cada huua Das que sam Ditas asy como 
cedayo estam nas beiras do mar os Rijos / sam terras de mujtos 
mamtimemtos E forom Ja De gramde povoo//. 

A terra de bulambuam Detreminase de huua parte com as terras Terra De 
Ja ditas de canjtam panarucam pajaruca E da outra parte com chamda buam 
no sertao E dahij p° diate tudo he terra serra atee dar nas terras do 
Rey da Jaoa que mais deue de chamar (?) do guste pate com verdade 
chamase o pate de bulambua pate pimtor este he grande ser gemtio 
Caualeiro temjdo E mujto acatado na Ja5a primcipall memte dos sres 
Jemtios este teue os mouros em peso De nom podere pasar adiamte 
hee a terra Deste De mujto pouo E tambem tem mujta fustalha no 
maar alem deste nom ha mais pates he Jemte Rustiq a como de mom- 
tanhas E he da obidiemcia Do guste pate// 



TOM Ii PIRES 


436 

He este sor De bulambuam tam emleuado por aver asy as terras de 
canjta & panaruca pajarucam E as terras de chande que todos o 
temem gramdememte este he f° De huua Jrmaa Do guste pate hee 
homem este que por suas noujdades viue homrrada memte tem em 
suas terras mujtos cavallos mais elle soo que todos os sres Da Jaoa 
mouros Juntos// a gemte de bulambua he de guerra hee a terra abas- 
tada De chande nom he necesario falar porq hee na terra firme & 0 
tem asy tornado// 

Das terras deste vem mujtos espauos E espauas ha vemder a toda a 
Jaoa tem multidam delies na terra deste quamdo seus Sres morre elles 
leua suas molheres ao foguo aquy nesta vida pdemdo os corpos E 
na outra ardemdo as almas E asy he em gamda qamdo o sor morre 
suas molheres se matam ou qeyma ou afogam no maar como Ja dise//. 

Acabada hee a gramde Jlha da Jaoa Da melhor maneira que della 
pude emquerir E emvestiguar verificamdome com mujtos E o que me 
parecia comcordare bem comcordado ysto espeuj E certo nom vam 
fora da hordem de que he E nom hee Duujda as cousas da Jaoa serem 
mais E mais homrradas do que as comtam E de suas fidalgujas 
oufanjas Detremjnafoees ousadias homde com verdade se achara 
nestas partes asy atee aguora Eu nom ouuj/ os malaios soberbos sam 
mas tem a soberba apremdida dos Ja5s nom se deuem fazer compara- 
coes por q os Jaos tem em sustamfia a soberba E oufanja E os outros 
por a^demte ou arte pois se onesto fose neste Recomtameto falar das 
Matronas Jaoas nom he memtira que sam tam emleuadas que por 
quail qr descomtemtameto se matam as crisadas por sy mesmo E 
ellas as vezes matam os maridos E hee custume da Jaoa a molher ser 
buscada primeiro qe se lam5e com seu marido por q trazem crises 
secretos ysto se custuma amtre os fidallgos //. 

Fol. i55r. E porque nom seja a oufanja mais conhecida q em Jaoa haa duas 
limgoagees huua amtre fidallguos E outra do pouoo nom difere como 
cortesao amtre nos mas out°s sam os nomes Das cousas amtre os 
fidallguos & out a s no pouo sem duujda hee ysto em tudo //. 

As molheres fidalguas Javas seus aparatos seus vestidos suas coroas 
& dyademas Douro homde se custuma sena na Jaoa quamdo saem 
trazem estado E aparemgias amgelicas nam ha duujda no mumdo 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 437 

aVr eleuadas molheres E Daquj vem a mujtas morrere virgees em 
suas casas quamdo nom acham seu comtemtamemto pa casar com 
pesoas gramdes pois estas taes oufanjas De que pogedem senom do 
naturall Da terra pois qmdo as molheres asy eleuam que faram os 
Jaos anafados soberbos que o pay nem a may na sam ousados por 
prazer poer a maao na cabega ao f° nem ho marjdo a molher a molher 
pode por ao marido por Rey da terra// 

E destes pates q sam em Jaoa na beira do mar que ajmda nom tern 
a fidalguja tamto em peso como os de demtro por que haa tres dias q 
vem descrauagem E De mercadores estes sam tarn emleuados que 
cada huu delies he acatado como se fosem Sres do mumdo cada huu 
sae tam eleuado a montear & a follguar nom pasam tempo senam em 
prazeres com estados de tamtas lancas Dallvados douro pta como 
ferro amtre nos De tamtas tauxias de tamtos gallgos lebrees E out°s 
caees sam de tamtos Retauollos pimtados De Jmages E cagas os 
pannos seus bamdados douro os crises espadas facas cutellos todos 
cozidos em tauxias douro a copia das molheres mamcebas & ginetes 
alifamtes bois de carro de macanaria douro de pimturas amdam em 
carros triumfamtes & se amdam polio maar Em calaluzes pimtados 
tam limpos he lavrados com tamtos seos os Remeiros nam sam vistos 
do sor limdos Repartimemtds pa suas molheres out°s asemtos pa os 
fidalguos que vam com elles certamemte tudo comforme a suas 
famtesijas/ homees q muj t0 estima suas homrras //. 

porq noso Recomtamemto vaa hordenado sem amtremjsa alguua 
correremos ate bamdam & porque bamdam he a temga do falar por 
ser o lugar do mais das Jlhas q no meio estam nom sera o Recomta- 
memto estemso mas breue pois nom sam proueitosas .s. he loguo 
peguado com a Jaoa as Jlhas de baly & de bombo a Jlha de cimbava a 
Jlha de byma a Jlha Do foguo a Jlha de soloro/ malua/ lucucamby/ 
gitor batojmbey/ mujtas out a s que nesta corda estam//. 

As Jlhas de baly/ & bombo/ & gimbaua/ a pimeira Jlha Junto com a 
Jaoa he baly & a outra bombo E a outra cimbava todas estas tern Reis 
he cada huua de mujtos portos E mujtas aguoas mujtos mamtimem- 
tos mujtos espauos espauas// sam ladroes tem lamcharas amdam a 
salteear sam todosjemtios tem tratos com a Jaoatrazemmamtimemtos 



TOM ^ PIRES 


AJlha 
De byma. 


Fol. 155V. 

AJlha do 
Foguo 


A Jlha de 
Solor. 


Ylhas de 
t ijmor 
domde 
vem os 
samdollos 
bramcos 


438 

& panos a sua guisa p° mercadaria E mujtos espavos E mujtos ca- 
vallos q leuam a Jaoa a vemder'/ /. 

A Jlha De byma alem destas he Jlha gramde De Rey gemtlo tem 
mujtos paraos E mujtos mamtimemtos em gramde abastamfa/ tem 
carnes pescados tem mujtos tamarjmdos tem mujto brasyll que 
trazem a malaq a a vemder E de malaqua vam la por elle porque he da 
valla de china E o brasill De byma he m to dellgado vail na china 
menos q ho de siam por que o De siam he mais groso E melhor tem 
asy mesmo a bima gramde numero descrauos E mujtos cavallos q 
leuam a Jaoa Esta Jlha tem trato he gente baca De cabellos corrediSs 
tem esta Jlha mujtas pouoagoes & bem asy mujta gente & mujtas 
matas aq 1 fazem escala os q vam pa bamdam E maluco & compam 
aq 1 mujtos panos q sam da valija de bandam E maluq 0 tem esta Ylha 
alguu ouro valem nella as caixas da Jaoa//. 

Junto com esta Jlha estaa a Jlha gramde do foguo mujto alta pouo- 
ada de mujta gemte estes Auda a sal tear tem mujtos portos E de 
mujtos mamtimemtos E mujtos espauos pa vendr ; Esta Jlha tem feira 
De ladroes que vem vemder aquj os furtos q fazem polas out a s Jlhas 
hee De Rey gemtio E todos sam gemtios faz na emtrada Do camjnho 
de timor de que se falara Despois De soloro/. 

A Jlha de Soloro he mujto gramde tem Rey gemtlo he de muj tos 
portos E de muj tos mamtimetos Em gramde abastam?a tem Jmfyni- 
dade De tamarimdos tem mujto emxufre E por esta mercadoria he 
mais conhecida que por outra Desta Jlha trazem gamde catidade de 
mamtimemtos a malaq a E trazem tamarimdos e emxufre he este 
exufre he tamto que o leuam por mercadaria de malaq a a cauchy 
china por que esta he a primcipall mercadoria que de malaq a vay pa 
laa. amtre esta Jlha de solor & a de byma he o canall pas Jlhas de 
timor homde ha os samdallos De que logo se dlra nestas Jlhas Ja ditas 
valem as mercadorias que valem e Jaoa// 

Amtre as Jlhas de byma E de solor se faz huu canall gramde por 
homde vam as Jlhas Dos samdollos todalas Jlhas de Jaoa pa diamte se 
chamam tymor por q na limgoaje Da terra timor quer dizer levamte 
como se disesem as Jlhas de leuamte por pincipall se chamam as Jlhas 
de timor estas duas Domde vem os samdollos// as ylhas de timor sam 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


439 

de Reis gemtios nestas duas ha gramde soma de samdalos braquos 
valem mujto barato por que os matos nom tem out a madeira dizem os 
mercadores malaios que ds criou timor De samdallos & bamdam de 
ma^as E as de maluco de crauo E que no mumdo nom he sabido 
outra parte em q estas mercadarias aja somemte nestas E eu pregun- 
tey & emquery deligente memte se estas mercadorias avja Em outra 
parte & todos dize q nam 

Deste canall atee as Jlhas De maluco nauegamdo com bom vemto 
vam em seis sete Dias sam estas Jlhas Doemtias a gemte nom he 
mujto Vrdadeira a esta Jlha vam De malaca & de Jaoa cadano E vem 
os samdollos a malaq a he boa mercadoria e malaca por que emtre 
todallas na^oees De qua se custuma mormete amtre os Jemtios// 

Leuam laa sinabafos pamchavilezes sinhauas balachos cotobala- tnerca- 
chos que sam panos bramquos valem em timor panos de cambay a Aleman 
baixos E por pouca mercadoria carregam os Juncos de samdollos hee tymor 
Riqua a viagem De timor he doemtia partem de malaca na mou9am & 
tempo q vam a bandam nese torno Dizem que amtre as terras De 
byma E solor ha pedras E que se pdem Juncos senom vam polo canall 
E ysto sera obra De mea leguoa homde haa este priguo E que he boo 
abocallo De dia//. 

De fromte das Jlhas de solor esta a Jlha q se chama batutara he Batutara 
Jlha de Jemtios de m tos mamtimemtos Daly se toma a rrota abatida 
pa bamdan & pa ambon E porq as out a s Jlhas que corre pola corda de 
solor nom fazem a bem de mercadoria p° serem fora de maao nom 
fa^o dellas fundameto sam todas de gemtios laDroees tem mamti- 
mentos mujtos aRozes 9aguus somemte agora falarey De bamdam 
pois nosa Jmcrina9a hee tamta aos fruytos de suas terras//: 

As Jlhas de bamdam sam seis cimquo tem ma9as e huua he de Ylhasde 
foguo a pincipal chamase pullo Bamdam esta tem quoatro portos .s. bamdam 
calamom/ olutatam / bomtar comber. Esta Jlha em comparacam Das 
outras tem macas e mais camtyDade tem estas pouoa9oes nom tem 
rrey Regense por cabillas & polios mais velhos | Sam os das beiras do Fol i$ 6 r. 
mar mouros mercadores haa trimta annos que se comecam a fazer 
mouros nas Jlhas de bamdam tem alguus gemtios demtro na terra a 
gemte de todas estas ylhas seram obra de duas mjll E quinhemtas p as 



TOME PIRES 


440 

atee tres mjll em todas as masas sam fruyta como peseguos ou albe- 
quorq es E camdo sam maduras abrem E a polpa de cyma cae E o de 
demtro fica Vrmelho que sam as ma9as sobre a noz & colhenas & 
lam9anas a seqar todo o anno ha este frnyto Em todollos meses se 
colhe avera em todas as ylhas obra De quinhemtos baares De ma9as 
cadano & ate bj e E de noz avera sejs sete mjll bahares E ysto cadano 
ora mais ora menos na he sempre de huua sorte E dizem que Ja 
teuerom estas ylhas mjll bahares De macas esta soo Jlha que se 
chama bamdam hee mdr que todalas out a s Jumt a s out a ylha chamase 
neira esta he porto omde amcora os Jaos chamase porto neyra esta 
tern macas E as out a s tres ylhas .s. pulo aee & pullo Rud & pulo 
bomcagy sam tres Jlhas pequenas que tern macas nom tern portos pa 
nelas amcorare estas trazem suas ma9as a Jlha de bamdam todas estam 
a vista perto huas Das out a s na Jlha nom fallo p° nom ser De merca- 
daria ne out a Jlha pequena q se chama lanacaqe que tern 9aguu// 

A Jemte destas Jlhas he de cabello negro corredio he aguora Riq a 
mais q Damtes porq aguora vemdem melhor E de melhor pre90 suas 
macas E amte os Jaaos E malaios nauegaua a estas Jlhas cadano E 
levauam pouquos panos & dauam comsyguo na Jaoa E alij faziam 
escalla vemdiam o mais & melhor de sua Roupa por caixas E por 
outras cousas de baixa sorte E daly partiam pa cimbava & pa byma E 
as mercadorias q leuava De Jaoa vemdia nestas duas Jlhas em que Ja 
faziam proueyto asy no que vemdiam e a Jaoa como no que Da Jaoa 
leuava aas Ditas Jlhas De byma E cimbaua & nas Jlhas compraua 
pannos Da valia De bamdam E por elles E por caixas Da Jaoa com- 
praua as ma9as & tamto q o Jumco chegaua a bamdam tomauam a 
guouemam9a da terra E emquamto hy estavam comprauam como 
queria E quamdo os De bamdam avia panno boo a maao era gramde 
novidade a elles & elles lhe punham o pre90 aos da trra & eram adora- 
dos os capitaees Do Jumquo Do pouoo//. 

Aguora despSis que estas Jlhas De bamdam sam da nauegacam & 
Jurdicao DellRey noso s 5 r nam se faz asy mas sam os de bamdam 
Sres Das Roupas Riq as he em mujta camtidade E a maiores pre90S 
Recebemdo sempe merces & dadiuas & boa companhija polios purtu- 
gueses homde vam comprar por ouro he cousas Ricas o que os mou- 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 44I 

ros compram por palha/ E ajmda mall comtemtes De nosas compan- 
hias II 

Synabafos de todas sortes E todo out ro genero de pannos bramcos merca- 
delgados De bemgalla todo panno De bonuaqlim .s. panos emRolados 
de ladrilho grade meao pequeno topetljs E pannos do guzarate de bamdam 
toda sort e/ de maneira q bem avemturada se deue de chamar a gemte 
de bamdam E nam sem causa os Reis De maluq 0 sabedores das 
cousas de bamdam sospira por nos como se dira quamdo Das nobres 
Jlhas se falar. E os mercadores q damtes la nauegava copram p° 
panelas velhas E brinqos & comtas de cambay a & por outr a s seme- 
lhantes domde nom he duujda bamdam ter aguora mais Riqueza'//. 
tern tambem bamdam crauo que vem de carreto De maluq 0 a ambono 
& dambon a bamdam ysto em doze quinze Dias com mou?a vail ho 
baar Do crauo como huu baar De ma9as E huu de macas como sete 
de noz E nom vos vendem senom macas he noz Juntam te .s. se 
queres huu baar De macas aves de comprar sete de noz porque Doutra 
maneira nom poderia a mercadoria sofrer que se pderia a noz se a no 
vemdesem desta man ra // | A pimcipall mercadoria pa bamdam sam Fol. 156V. 
os pannos do guzarate .s. bretamgljs Vrmelhos E pretos cantos 
maindis bramcos & pretos panos de cora9ones patolas E despois estes 
pannos de bemgalla E depos bemgalla Da bonua qujlim/ do guzarate 
lamedares mujtos sabones/ lamcada a comta custa cada bahar de 
macas tres cz dos E tres & m° segumdo as mercadarias por que com- 
praes & tall ha que custa quoat 10 qmto a Roupa he mais fyna qmto 
mais caro compraes por que seu emtemto he Roupa baixa pa a gemte 
E porque de gramdes partes dilhas de fora vem ha bamDam comprar 
a Roupa bamda de bato ymbo ate papua de papua ate maluq 0 E out a s 
mujtas Jlhas compram em bamdam polio peso do bahar De malaq a / 
qem la vay leua o peso E pesa framca memte em bamdam/ tem bamda 
demtes de marfim E ouro que trazem Dout a s ylhas a vemder •// 

As Jlhas de bamdam nam tem mamtimetos easy nada as Jlhas 
darredor lhe traze os mamtimemtos a vemder E os Jumcos q la vam 
leuam aRoz de byma & cousas De comer 9aguu hee a moeda da terra 
9aguu he pam defe^am de ladrilho he feito De meolo de pao E mujto 
bizcoytado E traze mujto das Jlhas comarcaas aas Jlhas De bamdam e 



442 


tom£ pires 


emtam corre por moeda tamtos ^aguus por tal cousa asy como e 
P a 9 ee pimemta tem gramdes Jlhas bamdam a Jornada de dous tres 
ds Domde se fornecem sam de gemtios. E todos sam lavradores//. 

Tres Jlhas estam perto de bamdam da Jlha de papua vem os pa- 
paguaios nores os mais prezados Das Jlhas que se chamam darn vem 
os pasaros que traze mortos que se chama pasaros de ds E dizem que 
vem do geo E que lhe no acha na^imemto E destes os turqos E 
parses fazem penachos sam pa o tall vso conuenjemtes os bemgallas 
os compram hee boa mercadoria he vem pouquos & 

Nauegacam de dous dias E menos estaa a pomta da gramde Jlha de 
ceira he Deixar ambon porque ambom estaa pegado easy com as Jlhas 
de ceiram as Jlhas de ceira come^am da Jlha De guram & vem easy 
apomtar Junto com maluq 0 & e estreita esta Jlha E nauegase asy pola 
bamda de dentro por ambom como por de fora E asy De huua parte 
como da out a he pouoado De portos he pouoacoes por demtr 0 sam os 
portos de gule gule/ bemuaor/ cejlam/ E outros atee bamda & por 
detras sam tana muar/ olu/ varam/ E dizem que por detras he bem 
segura a nauegaca e em breve as Jlhas dambon sam estas ambom 
ytaqo a y vulm^alao// se falamdo nestas Jlhas de Junto com bamdam 
for afastado dos pilotos eu nom so culpado por q nisto me cometo a 
quem la foy ysto tenho sabido por mouros por suas cartas que mujtas 
vezes vy E se suas cartas foram aRumadas fora decrarada mete seja 
ysto pa leer E nom pa Rotear & 

He a Jemte de bamdam asy estu9iosa que tem pouoa9a na serra 
homde se acolhe qmdo suas pouoacoes das beiras do mar se semtem 
em alguua afromta & laa Recolhem tudo a serra & bamdam cousa 
pequena & fraca & taall q estaa a guouernan9a De quallquer Junco 
q la vay ora seja De Jaos ou de malaios E Despois de bamdam nam 
hay mais q dizer Detremjno pasarme a maluqo homde noso emtemto 
hee pmcipall/ polio camjnho de ambom & 

Ylhas He ambom huua Jlha E Junto com ella estaa yta cuaij vull nucalao e 
dambon estam todas case peguadas com a costa de ceiram da ylha he Jemte de 
cabello Revolto bestiall nom tem mercadoria E tem porto nom mujto 
bom no tem trato he lugar De gemte priguosa que tem Diligem9ia 
Fol. i57r. de pasar | a maluquo ficam alij o que he sabido se quisesem pasariam 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


443 


mas por que os mouros nom tem amcoras de metall E nam sam homes 
do maar que por qllqr afromta deyxam tudo & vanse a nado nom fa- 
zem suas navega9oes como deuem de malaq a a bamdam E a maluq 0 
senpe se punha dous tres annos & perdemse mujtos Jumqos E nam 
hee despamtar por que os mouros destas bamdas nam tem nehuu 
saber E sam espauos os mareamtes E tamto lhes daa e Ja 5 a como em 
maluquo nam tem necesydade depresa portamto fazem suas viagees 
lomgas/ agora me paso a maluquo De cuja obidiemcia ambom hee//. 

chegados somos aas Jlhas de maluq 0 porque noso emtemto nom Ylhasde 
sera pasar daq por diamte pois pa iso nam ha ne9esidade somemte malu 9 ° 
das Jlhas do crauo he daq 1 me tornarey pa casa// 

As Jlhas de maluco sam cimq 0 que dam crauo .s. a primcipall se 
chama temate & a outra tidore E a outra motes/ E a out a maqujem E 
a outra pacham he tambem no porto De Jeilolo na terra da Jlha do 
batochina/ ha mujto crauo agreste// as Jlhas de maluq 0 segundo se 
afirma De cimqoenta annos a esta parte sam o come90 dos mouros os 
Rex das Jlhas sam mouros nam muj t0 emcarnados na seyta mujtos 
sam mouros sem sere circum9idados E nam sam mujtos os mouros os 
Jemtyos sam De quoatro partes as tres E mais // he a gemte Destas 
Jlhas ba9a sam de cabellos corredios tem guerra o mais do tempo huus 
com out°s sam easy todos paretes 

Teram estas cimquo Jlhas cadano pouquo mais ou menos seis mjll 
bahares De crauo as vezes tem mais mjll as vezes menos mjll segijmdo 
a verdade a mercadorya q se em malaca compra por qnhemtos Rs por 
ella se compra em maluquo huu baar De crauo he o bahar De peso 
De malaqua por que a ese Respeito o pesa E os mercadores leuam 
ho peso/ por que as vezes vail menos E mais pouca cousa tem o crauo 
cadano seis no vidades// De malaca amtigamete soyam hir ha bamdam 
E a maluq 0 oyto Juncos E tres quatro dagacij & outs 0 tamtos de 
malaq a os De malaca eram De curia Deva chatim mercador E os 
Dagacij de pate cu9uf q tinha la o trato & com estes metiam outs 0 
mercadores asy Jaos como malaios mas estes dous eram os pin9ipaes 
mercadores em o quail trato cada huu ganhou/ gramde soma Douro 
valia e malaca sempre o crauo quamdo era mujto a noue cz dos ho 
bahar E a dez E quamdo pouco a doze cz dos ho baar/ 



TOM li PIRES 


444 


A Jlha de 
tarnate 
nosa 
amigua 


Fol. 157V. 


merca- 
darias q 
ha em 
ternate 


A principal Jlha de todas 9imquo hee a Jlha de ternate he o Rey 
mouro chamase colta bem acorala Dizem que he bom homem tem sua 
Jlha cadano mjll E qnhemtos bares De crauo E daquij pa girm// 
poderam ancorar no porto desta Jlha duas tres naos esta he boa 
pouoagam/ tem este Rey alguus mercadores estrangeiros e sua terra a 
Jlha Dizem que sera De dous mjll homees E seram mouros atee 
Duzemtos este Rey he poderoso amtre seus vizinhos tem sua terra 
farta de matymemtos Da terra posto que aos Rex de maluquo dout a s 
Jlhas lhe vem mujtos m tos como se despois dira chamase somete 0 
Rey de ternate 9olta os out°s chamamse Raja tem este guerra com seu 
sogro Raja almam9or Rey da Jlha De tidore tem este atee 900 paraos 
sera a Jlha e Roda seis leguoas tem esta Ylha no meio huu piquo que 
Daa mujto emxofre q arde em muj ta cantidade//. 

Tem este Rey de ternate a metade da Jlha de motei por sua domde 
lhe lhe vem mujtos matimemtos ternate he terra mais Domestica que 
nenhuua das outras posto que outra tem melhor porto E mais trato 
por causa delle este Rey dizem q faz Justi9a tem sua gemte obediemte 
Diz que folgaria de ver ca9izes xstaos porq se lhe bem pare9ese nosa 
fee que se alomgaria Da sua seyta E tornasya xstao // 

este Rey de ternate por ser home de bob syso quamdo soube que 
framcisq 0 serrao estava em ambon mamdou por elle E por out°s 
purtugueses q se pderam na viage damtonjo Dabreu E Recolheos a 
sua terra E fezlhe homrra E espeueo o dito Rey cartas a malaq a de 
como elle he suas terras eram espauos DellRey noso sor como mais 
largamete se veera por suas cartas que trouxe amtonjo De mjramda 
que foy a bamdam he mamdou a ambom homde as cartas vierom ter 
as quaes trouxe frc co serrao & tornouse pa ternate por asy ficar 
acom9ertado/ 

Sam os de ternate caualeiros amtre os malucos sam omees que 
bebem de vinhos a sua gsa tem boas auguas ternate he terra sadia 
& de boos ares tem o Rey de ternate das portas suas ademtro quoatro- 
9emtas molheres todas filhas dalguo tem mujtas f a s deltas// 0 Rey 
quamdo vay a guerra saie com coroa douro E os fs° asy as traze por 
denydade sam estas coroas temperadas em valija//. 

Tem crauo a terra/ de fora das Jlhas de bemgaia vem mujto ferro 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


445 

em ferro machados cuytellos espadas facas vem ouro Dout a s ylhas 
tem alguu marfym pouquo tem panos baixos a sua manelra vem 
muj tos papagaios das Jlhas de mor E de cera vem os papagaios 
bramqos //. 

Vail e maluquo a Roup a baixa De cambaia E da fyna vail todo 
panno de Bonna quelim emRolado & de ladrilho gramde meao pe- 
queno patollas todo panno baixo he bramquo asy como synhauas 
balachos pamchavelizes cotobalachos porem a cabe9a da mercadaria 
he Roup a de cambay a E Rabos de bois E vacas bramcos que trazem 
de bemgalla //. 

Ho crauo tem seis noujdades no anno Dizem out°s que o ha todo o 
anno mas q em seis tempos do anno ha mais// Despois da froll he 
verde & despois tomase Vrmelho emtam ho colhem Delle a mao 
delle varejado E asy vermelho ho Deitam a emxugar em esteiras E 
tornase preto sam aruores pequenas ho crauo na9e como mortinhos 
na9em muj tas cabecas Jumtas estaa todo este fruyto na maao Dos 
JemtiSs & de suas maos vem todo as beiras do mar 

por q esta Jlha de ternate he a mais lomgue de todas dambom & 
deuera de ser a ordem loguo Da mais Junta ambom q he pachao 
porem por ser ternate a melhor cousa se fallou pmeiro della E asy por 
ser Rey vasallo delRey noso sor E aguora me Jrey chegamdo a 
ambom comtamdo as Jlhas//. 

Partimdo De ternate pa ambom navegamdo tres leguoas se mostra 
a Jlha de tidora he huua ylha terra Dez leguoas em Roda hee o Rey 
desta Jlha mouro Jmiguo DelRey De ternate & seu sogro / tera este 
ellRey em sua terra dous mjll homees Dos qees os Duzemtos seram 
mouros os out°s sa Gemtios chamase o Rey Raja almam9or tem 
mujtas molheres & fs° tera a terra Deste mjll & qoatrocemtos bares de 
crauo cadano na Jlha deste no ha porto pa amcorare naos he Rey 
poderoso este tamto como ho de ternate sempre tem guerra // estes 
dous sam os mais homrrados de maluquo/ E compitem tera este em 
sua terra oytemta paraSs tem este Rey por vasallo a ellRey De 
maqiem//. 

Tem este Rey obidiemte asy ametade da Jlha de motei tem sua 
terra muj tos m tos DaRozes carnes pescados Dizem que hee omem de 


merca- 
dorias q 
valem em 
Ternate/ 


Como 
nage o 
crauo 


Ylha de 
tidora. 



TOM^ PIRES 


Fol. i$8r. 

Ylha de 
motet 


Ylha de 
maqujem 


446 

bom syso este Rey deseja m t0 o trato comnosquo por que as Jlhas de 
maluq 0 perdemse E o crauo ha tres annos q se nam apanha senam 
pouqo por causa Da navega?a q nom ha da tomaDa de malaq a a 
esta part e//. 

Navegamdo desta Jlha de tidore amdadura de seis leguoas estaa a 
Jlha de motei esta ylha tera em Roda quoatro ou cimquo leguoas 
tem huua serra no meyo a meia ylha obede^e a elRey De temate a 
outra metade ao de tidore tem cada huu posto seu capitam em sua 
terra Esta Jlha he toda de gemtios tera seiscetos homees tem esta ylha 
cada huu anno mjll E duzemtos bares de crauo tera cada capitam 
destes quoatro cimq 0 lamcharas pequenas tem esta ylha muj tos mam- 
timemtos & cada parte socore a seu senhdr. sam os capitaes destas 
Jlhas gemtios homees cavaleiros & p as homrradas E amiguos huu do 
out 10 //. 

Asy o Rey de tidore como esta ylha de motei trazem seu crauo em 
paraos a Jlha de'maquyem a vemder por qmto aly hee o porto homde 
vem os Jumquos ancorar 

Da Jlha de motei a cimquo leguoas pareye a Jlha De maqujem esta 
Jlha de maqujem tem em Roda oyto ou nove leguoas tera tres mjll 
homees tem cemto & trimta paraos/ tera De crauo cadanno mjll E 
qujnhemtos baares chamase o Rey Raja Vgem he mouro E obra de 
trezemtos homees em sua terra tem esta Jlha de maq 1 ? mujto bom 
porto esta he a Jlha omde os Junqos carregua E de todas as Jlhas aquj 
trazem o crauo a vemder somemte De ternate q vam tambem laa por 
causa do porto e q podem amcorar/ tem mujtos mamtimetos he Rey 
easy como os outros & tem gemte mais q tidore E paraos//. 

Este Raja Vfem Rey desta Jlha de maquiem he pmo comjrmaao 
do Raja alma^or Rey de tidore E alguua obidiemgia tem este Rey ao 
dito Rey de tidore tem este porto alguuus estramgeiros estes deseja 
mujto nosa paz dizem q este he bom home he esta he a terra De 
mais trato que as out a s E tamto que os Juncos vem aq 1 ha amcorar 
he seu porto seguro E bom easy toda a Jemte hee Jemtia vem a esta 
Jlha De mujtas Jlhas com mercadorias tem mamtimemtos em abas- 
tanca he augua boa E a Jemte Dizem q he domestica a das beiras do 
maar & 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


447 

Desta Jlha de maquyem que dise a as Jlhas de pacham avera Ylhasde 
quatorze leguoas estas ylhas de pacham sam dez ou doze a ylha q se P ac ^ m 
chama pacham tern crauo as out a s nam chamase o Rey desta Jlha 
Raja cufuf tern mor terra E mais Jemte q nenhuu dos Reis de maluq 0 
E majs paraos este Rey he meio Jrmao DelRey de ternate sam gramdes 
amiguSs he toda a Jemte case gemtios tem boos portos aquj vem aYr 
vista desta terra os q ham de carregar em maluquo E Daquy vam a 
outs a ylhas hee pacham corda dilhas que vam ter comt a ceiram sobre 
ambon tera esta Jlha qnhemtos baares De crauo cadano tem mujto 
breu nom tem mujtos mamtimetos mas das out a s ylhas os trazem e 
abastam9a, tratam em sua terra gramdememte tem esta ylha pa- 
pagayos esteiras E outras cousas q a ella vem comprar //. 

Segumdo tomey emformafam ha mujto pouquo tempo que ho 
crauo desta terra era syluestre asy como brunhos a ameixias ou zam- 
bujo a oliueira he q amtigua memte este crauo nom se gastaua dizem 
que por estarem estas arvores e lugares bravios abafados E que dez 
annos a esta parte he feyto crauo bom como quail quer do outro & que 
se vay acrecemtando muyto o cravo nesta Jlha haa desta Jlha a Jlha 
dambom quoremta leguoas Ao mais todo o crauo Destas cimquo 
Ylhas he De huua mesma bomdade se o colhem semdo perfeita- 
memte maduro //. 

Tambem nesta Jlha sequam os Ramos das aruores com muj tas 
folhas hee mercaDaria por que na nosa parte deiropa se gastam as 
ditas folhas em lugar De betele E por que o betelle sequo nom tem 
sustan£ia De od 5 r em seu | lugar metem as folhas hee mercadoria q Fol. 158V. 
Amtiguamemte levam a veneza pola vija Dalexamdria E em purtugall 
bem avera vinte annos q eu tenho vsado as ditas folhas em lugar do 
dito folio Jmdio que hee betelle// 

Feito o Recomtamemto das cimquo Jlhas de maluquo vimdo de 
ternate pa ambon E se asy nom for em hordem torne a comtar de 
ambom pa ternate come^amdo De pacham nam diguam que a naue- 
gacam de malaqua pa maluquo seja priguosa porque hee bom cam- 
jnho he pa as nosas naoos cornu enjemte E nauegase com vemtos de 
mon£ao em huu mes a bamdam ou a ambom & daly a maluq° em huu 
dia & dous nosas naos bem aparelhadas nom faram detem^a em 



tom£ pires 


448 


Ylhade 

bato 

chyna 


ambom pasarseam a maluq 0 qmto mais qem teue maneira De sabr e 
emvestigar de purtuguall vijr ha maluquo em tam pouco tempo tra- 
balhamdo cada him e seu tempo como he sabido tera maneira qem 
quiser ter zello das cousas se acabarem a seruifo dellRey noso sor 
nom fazer o camjnho De maluquo pola vya da costa da Ja5a / 

Somemte por symgapura E de symgapura a burney & de bumey as 
Jlhas de butum E lloguo a maluquo pa quem naueguou a maluquo 
mujto limpo camjnho achou sempre este em huua mou?ao he presto 
o camjnho da Ja5a pa maluquo foy avido por provisao Desta maneira/ 
anos vem bem ho camjnho De bumey pa maluq 0 & aos mercadores 
de malaq a o de Ja5a anos o De bumey porq nom fazemos escala De 
trra e terra / vemdemdo aq vemDemdo qua ganhamdo em cada lugar 
De maneira que se alomga ho tempo E com pouco cabedall E os 
nauegamtes sam espauos fazem suas viages compridas & proueitosas 
por que De malaq a leuam mercadarias da valia Da Jaoa & da Jaoa 
mercadorias da valia De byma & cimbava & destas Jlhas levam pan- 
n5s pa bamdam E maluq 0 E os q leuam Reseruados de malaq a 
ADoram os de bamdam & maluq 0 nelles E asy fazem suas merca- 
dorias o q nom poderiam fazer pola vya de bumey E butum E ma- 
ca?ar'//. 

Nos nam somos asy proueitosos pa aumemtar a fazemda de sua baixa 
man ra nem menos somos do seu vaguar por que trazemos agemte 
a soldo som te tomamos noso fumymemto larguo & de boa Roup a 
cometemos noso camynho fazemos nosa mercadoria como portugue- 
ses nam domestiqos a ella & os panos anychelados/ dos Reaes merca- 
dores estam empapelados porque semtem a mercadoria E desta 
maneira fazemos noso camjnho prestes portamto o camjnho de bur- 
ney nos conue pa melhor por q he Ja sabido ds seja louuado bom he 
E asaz proueytoso// 

Despois de maluquo tenho falado de cimquo ylhas aguora tambem 
quero Dizer da Jlha de bato chijna por amor do porto de Jelolo q tem 
mujto era vo E esta perto de ternate noso amiguo//. 

A Jlha de bato china he huua corda de terra gramde de huua 
bamda vem sobre ambom E ceiram & da outra estemdese comtra 0 
norte as ylhas de mor/ he gramde mujto toda he de gemtios tem muj- 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


449 

tos mamtimentos he muyta gemte E muytos paraos delles amdam 
a furtar delles amdam de mercaDoria asy como toda out a nacam ha 
seis leguoas de temate a esta ylha este he o porto que se chama Jeilolo 
demtro nesta ylha de bato chyna este porto somemte/ tern Rey mouro 
tern o porto deste mujtos mantimetos hee Jmigo DelRey de ternate & 
fazem huu a out 0 saltos & tomadias tem esta terra De Jeilolo muj t0 
crauo brauo como a Jlha de pacha dizem q trabalha de o fazere bom 
te esta Jlha bom porto & he a Jemte Ja mais branq a alguu tanto q ha 
de maluquo// 

outras Jlhas muj tas estam aRedor de maluq 0 polla vya do norte Fol. i5gr. 
que sam as Jlhas de mor & chiaoa tolo bemgay a ao ponemte de celebe 
9olor em as quaes ha mujtos mamtimemtos ve a maluq° tratar trazem 
ouro tambem alguuas destas Jlhas tem gemte case bramca mas 
por que noso emtemto nom he espeuer destas ylhas por que seria 
necesario espeuer doutras fern mjll nom fa^o particular nem gerall 
memsam dellas aq somemte q na Jlha De papua que sera oitemta 
leguoas de bamdam Dizem que ha os omees das orelhas gramdes que 
se cobrem com ellas numca vy que vise out 0 q as vise Jaz ysto no 
pouco q hee asy//. 

Recapitoladas as cousas de maluq 0 segumdo dizem que Ja sam daq 
pa diamte nom serei ousado pasar somemte atequj foy meu emtemto/ 
quem sera poderoso escreuer o gramde numero E emfynjdade dilhas 
que haa do estreito de campar atee bamdam E do estreito de synga- 
pura atee as Jlhas de Jampom q sam alem da china & desta Jlha 
cortamdo a bamdam E nestes meios q seram mais de duas ou 
tres mjll leguoas em Roda qem sera poderoso nellas fallar & he 
certo que mujtas delas merecem que delas se fale porque mujtas 
tem ouro porque seria nunqua acabar e emfastiar/ somemte nesta 
tanta copia espeuerey alguuas com que De malaq a comonjca E tam- 
bem no tempo pasado E geeral memte tocarey e out a s De maneira 
q mjnha tem^am se acabe E se mjnha temca nam for De peso seja 
perdoado//. 

estas sam as Jlhas amtre todas com que malaqua trata e ellas tratam 
com malaq a .s. tamjom pura/ a Jlha dalaue/ quedomdoam/ sam per / 
bilitam/ catepamuca/ maca9ar / vdama/ madura/ afora as que tenho 

p H.C.S. II. 



tom£ pires 


45 ° 


A ylha de 

tamjon- 

pura 


Ylha de 
laue 


ditas segumdo atras vam decrarada memte/ em burney & nos lu9oes 
nom falarey porque Ja he dito dellas na descr^a Da chijna 

A Jlha de tamjompura he Jlha que com moufao partimdo de 
malaq a em xb dias vam nella polio canall de symgapura E polo de 
campar tomam o camjnho Jmto com limgua amtre as Jlhas de limgua 
& monomby esta Jlha he de Jemtios hee easy sogeita a pate onuz 
senor de Japara tern esta Jlha pate guouernador sor Da Jlha hee Jlha 
de cimqoemta leguSas em Roda tern mujto ouro & aRoz E out°s 
mamtimetos tern mujtos diamamtes tern Juncos pangajavas tern 
mujta gemte de malaqua vam mercadarias panos da valia da Jaoa 
pn9ipall memte bretamgis Vmelhos pretos & Roupa de bemgala 
bramq a de pouq 0 pre90 trazem mamtimemtos & diamamtes & ouro 
nom se sabe parte omde aja Diamamtes senom no Reino de Rixia 
Jumto com bemgala estes sam os melhores E despois os desta Ilha 
de tamjonpura & despois os de laue em outro cabo nom se acham// 
hee Jemte a desta Jlha mercantive tern espauos mujtos q lhe traze 
doutras Jlhas & tambem de sy / tem muj t0 mell & 9era//. 

esta Jlha De laue he quoatro dias he quoatro dias damdadura alem 
de tamjompura hee tamanha como a de 9ima tem pates tem mujta 
Jemte todos sa Gemtios tratam com Jaoa & com malaq a he tamto da 
Jaoa case como de malaq a tem diamantes tem Juncbs ouro em mais 
camtidade que tamjompura tem mercadores hee terra De mujtos 
mamtimemtos he de boa gemte valem nela as mercadarias q sam ditas 
em cima valem panos quelijs he terra De boo trato nom hobede9e a 
nemgue sam estes homees easy da maneira dos Ja 5 s Rebustos valem- 


tes homes de suas p as tem mujta 9era// 

as ylhas estas seis Jlhas que aquj sam esptas sam em tomo das duas de 9ima 
de que- a n avega9am De tres quoatro dias huuas das out a s sam ylhas gramdes 

& de sam de mujta gemte sam de gemtios de pates tem Juncos pamgajavas tem 
per de es tas Jlhas todas ouro tem mujtos | mamtimemtos tem dellas buzios 
^catefS que he boa mercadoria ha nesta terra mujta erva De besteiros e em 
depamuca muyta camtidade a destes lugares he a melhor q se sabe nestas partes 
^ademaH sam os homees desta Jlha guerreiros & gramdes ladroes saltea por 
mujtos lugares qem vay de mercadoria vam a Recado nos portos Do 
Fol. 159V. ma g r sam domesticos a outra Jemte hee Rustica tem estas Jlhas 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 451 

Jmfynidade Desteiras de tres quoat° sortes tem Rotaas nam muytas 
tem peixe sequo breu mamtimemtos mujtos legumes tem vinhos 
nauegam estes em Ja5a e e malaq a // 
os Jaos vam comprar Jumcos a terra destes & estes qmdo vem a 
Jaoa vemdem os Juquos na terra sam gramdes frecheiros trazem estes 
mujtos espauos & ouro valem as mercadorias nas terras Destes as que 
se dise nas out a s ylhas vail beyjoym preto de palimbam// por detras 
destas Jlhas vay o camjnho pa maluquo pola vya De maca^ar & 
butum & vay tratar destas com burney & com os lugoees// 

As Jlhas De macacar sam alem das Jlhas que avemos dito amdadura 
de quoatro cimquo Dias estam no camjnho De maluquo sam mujtas 
Jlhas he gramde terra de huua bamda vem dar comsyguo em butum 
& sobre maDura & da out a estemdese mujto ao norte sam todos 
Jemtios dizem q tem mais de cimquoemta Reis estas Jlhas tratam com 
malaq a & com Ja5a he co burney & com syam & com todollos lu- 
gares q estam de pahao atee syam sa homees mais parecemtes a syames 
que a out a s nagoees sua limguoajem hee sobre sy desviada das out a s 
sam homes gemtios todos Rabustos gramDes guerreiros tem mujtos 
mamtimentos// 

Sam estes homees Destas Jlhas os mores ladroees que todollos do 
mumdo & sam poderosos & tem mujtos paraos nauegam Roubamdo 
de sua terra atee peguu & de sua terra atee maluquo & bamdam por 
todalas Jlhas por Jaoa & no mar trazem molheres tem feiras omde 
despacham suas mercadarias que furtam & vemdem os espauos que 
toma correm toda a Jlha de gomotora aRedor sam cosairos cabidoaes 
os Jaos chamanlhe bajuus & os malaios ysto lhe chamam E calates 
trazem seus furtos A Jumaia (?) que he Jumto com pahao homde 
vemdem & tem feira comtinoada memte//. 

os q nam seguem este estillo de furtar vem em suas pamgajavas 
gramdes bem feytas com mercadorias trazem mujtos mamtimemtos 
aRoz mujto bramq 0 trazem alguu ouro leuam bretamgijs & Roupa de 
cambaya & de bemgala alguua pouq a & dos qelis/ leuam beyjoym 
preto em mujta camtidade emcengo tem mujto povoo estas Jlhas E 
mujtas carnes hee terra mujto abastada trazem todos crises sam 
homees de boos corpos correm ho mumdo & todos os teme por q sem 


as Jlhas 
De 

macacar 



TOM ^ PIRES 


452 


ajlha de 
madira 


Fol. i6or. 

Recom- 
tamemto 
de todas 
as Jlhas 


Duujda todos os ladroees com Rezam obede^e a estes trazem mujta 
erva he tiram com ella / nom tern for^a cont a Juncos q todos se lhes 
defende mas todo outro naujo da terra leua na mao/ 

A Jlha de madura he gramde Jlha esta estaa defromte da Jaoa & a 
vista dagayy tem mujta gemte & tern Rey esta ylha de madura estem- 
dese gramdememte dizem q tera em Roda oytemta ou cem leguoas 
hee o pate de madura caualeiro pesoa muyto pincipall hee Jemtio 
chamase [blank] he casado com huua f a do guste pate da Jaoa dizem 
q madura tera cimquoemta mjll homees de peleja daq sam os mel- 
hores cavaleiros que da Jaoa sam muyto temjdos os de madura dizem 
q elles sam Jaos naturaes & tem gramdes famtesyas tem mujtos sa- 
^erdotes de Jemtios pesoas mujto estimados hee terra De mujtas 
lancharas sam homees bem apesoados a terra he de mujtos mamti- 
memtos tem mujtos cavallos gastamse na terra de madur a gramdes 
copias de panos q se fazem na mesma Jlha & outs° q de fora vem que 
elles vsam nom tem out a mercadaria senom aRoz & mamtimetos & 
mujtos espauos tem alguu ouro Do trato que tem as Jlhas q atras sam 
ditas & comfynam delas com madura tem este paz com aga^ij nom 
tem mouros esta Jlha de madura & sam nosos amiguos & 

Haa outra Jmfynidade dilhas nom he Rezam mais falar somemte 
que todas tem ouro espauos E huuas tratam com out a s & fazem as 
pequenas nas mores que dytas sam & as mores tratam com malaqua 
E malaqua com ellas despemdemdo & comutaDo aas mercadorias/ as 
mais destas Jlhas tem ouro & tambem tem todas cosairos & ladroees q 
nam viue doutra cousa nom navegam os cosairos senom em paraos 
sotijs & portamto nom empremdem Juncos & destes cosairos os 
mais cheguados a pahao fazem e paho suas escalas E os cheguados a 
maluq° E a bamdam fazem as escalas em byma & cimbava & capee 
& os cheguados a nos fazem feira e escalla e daruu & em arcat Rupat 
trazem mujtos Jmfimdos espauos E portamto se vsa a camtidade 
despauos e malaca por que todos vem a ella ter polio gramde trato 
que sobretodos os Reynos & portos destas bamdas tem E asy se 
chama Rijo bem avemturado he gerto ca gramdes partidas nam se 
sabe tarn grosa escalla como a de malaq a nem em q se tratem tarn 
nobres e estimadas mercadarias/ aquy se acha Da valia de todo le- 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


vamte aquy se vemde de toda valia De todo ponente nom he duujda 
que as cousas de malaq a sam de gramde peso & mujto proueyto & 
gramde omrra hee trra segumdo seu sytio nom pode demenujr mas 
sempre acrecemtar he fym De mou?oees homde achaees o que 
queres E as vezes mais do q cataees //. 

por leuar a costa da terra firme nom curey de me emtremeter na 
Jlha de ceilam he Despois easy della esque?ido era/ & nom me 
pareceo cousa onesta deixar de falar nella posto que seja em luguar 
amtresachado fora de camjnho porem a mjmguoa Do papell mo 
fez & por nom meter folha & quebrar a pmeira hordenan9a/ . 

A fremosa Jlha de ceilam Jaz setuada defromte de comorim 
estemdese atee easy naor q seram bem cemto & trinta leguas de 
costa If tanto avamte como o cabo de comorim se afasta por trimta & 
cimq 0 leguoas ao maar & dhy por diamte se vay mais cheguamdo 
atee se ajuntar espa^o de xb leguoas ho menos & amtre esta ylha & 
a costa De choromamdell navegam todalas naos do malabar somente 
as q cometem bemgala ou peguu syam estas vam por fora da Jlha 
da banda do sull 

A Jlha de ceilam he gramde sera de trezemtas leguoas em Roda 
mujto mais compida q largua he mujto pouoada tern mujtas pouoacoes 
& casas gramdes doracam de esteos de cobre & cubertos os tectos 
de chumbo & cobre/ os Reis de ceilam sam cimqo todos sam gemtios 
sam entre malabares & qujlijs De tudo tern a terra abastada somemte 
daRoz hee mjmguoada dos out°s mamtimemtos he abastada// 

A melhor parte da Jlha he na pomta q esta de fromte de calee atee 
comorim & aquy esta o primcipall Rey & as melhores pouoacoes & 
nesta pomta se fazem gramDes serranjas E aquj nacee a pedraria na 
terra deste Rey homde haa todo o trato he a Jlha De nauegaca & trato 
O pimcipall he columbo/ out 0 nygumbo & celabao & tenavarq e & 
balimgao/ o rey tern seu asemto Jumto com o porto de columbo meia 
leguoa do porto & polla moor parte tern esta Jlha as mercadorias 
seguintes 

Tern todo genero de pedraria eicepto diamamtes esmeralldas 
troquesas/ todalas out a s tern em camtidade as pedras nom se vemdem 
sem licemga do Rey toda peDra q valer na terra cimcoemta cz dos he 


merca- 
dorias de 
ceilam 



TOMIi PIRES 


Fol. i6ov. 


merca- 
dorias q 
vale e 
feild 

moeda da 
terra 


454 

do Rey estaa asy por hordenanca sopenna De morte a quem a teuer 
& da maao do Rey se vemde a quem laa vay comprar //. 

tem gramde copia dalifamtes & de marfim tem canella os alifamtes 
vemdense a couodos da pomta Da maao atee a pomta da espadoa 
se medem a canella vail a cz d0 o baar geerall memte o bahar he do 
tamanho do de cochim de tres qintaes he trimta aRates tem a terra 
mujta arequa q se chama avelana Jmdia e latim comese com ho 
betelle he mamtimeto & vaal mujto barata Vemdese em choro- 
mamdell*/- 

trata ceilam com todo choromamdell & bemgalla paleacate com 
alifamtes canela marfym & arreq a Retorna aRoz & samdollos 
bramquos aljofar panos he out a s mercadorias/ 

ARoz prata cobre azougue pouquo aguoas Rosadas samdollos 
bramcos he panos de cambaia cantos pouqos mamtazes vispi?es 
mujtas vail todo ho pano bramco & alguua Roup a pouca De paleacate 
pimemta pouq a & asy crauo & noz / 

Tem fanoees de prata q valem quatro huu fanam de cochim dos q 
valem xbiij huu ez d0 corre moeda douro em ceilam De toda parte 
e sua vallya // 

tem feilao bobs oficiaees macanjquos oriuezes ferr°s carpint°s 
torneiros pimcipall memte/ hee a Jemte de feila sesuda bem 
emsynada os grandes fazem pouca homrra aos estramgeiros & nom 
furtam se nom podem tem amtre sy Justica Jnteira// 

Tem o Rey gramde presumcam de lhe nom falarem senom muj t0 
ao lomge foy sempre trebutario ao Rey de coulam em coremta alifam- 
tes cadano & despois q foy o do ft or q la matarom e coula dizem q ho 
Rey de ceilam lhe nom paguou mais trebute/ a terra De ceilam he 
fremosa bem asombrada tem mujta gemte de guerra da terra 
frecheiros lanceiros tem de seu pouqas naoos tratam de coulam De 
bemgalla atee cambay a pincipal memte tratam no porto de columbo 
por ser mais pimcipall//. 

Com os out°s Reis nom tratam porq nam tem portos & alguus se 
tem sam baixos mas sam abastados Reis/ & vem trazer os alifamtes & 
canella a terra Deste & aly se faz concerto de suas mercadarias estes 
Reis tem alguu aRoz e suas terras todos sam paremtes & amiguos// 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


455 

Tem a Jlha de ceilam mujtos homees Religios 5 s asy como frades 
momges begujnos castos & todo malabar ou gemtio tem em venera- 
9am as ouservam^ias De ceilam os templlos seus sam Ricamete 
ornados & os sacerDotes vestidos de bramquo nom ao custume do 
pouo querem mall a mouros & a nos pior Dizem as Nagoees que 
se Regem todos em Justi^a //. 

Ho Rey da china nom so^ede De pay a filho Nem sobrinho so- Fol. 16 ir. 
memte por eleicam do coselho de todo ho Regno amda semp na Q omo 
cidade De cambara omde o Rey esta & o mandarim q se por estes fazem 
aproua fiq a Rey// ^ ey 

Nom pode sair nenhuu chim pa a bamda De siam Jaaoa malaq a Regi- 
pacee & dhy adiante sem licemca dos Regedores de quamtom & 
pollas asynaturas da licemca De poder sair he tornar lhe leuam tamto C erq a dos 
que ho nom podem soportar & nom saem & se alguu estranjeiro Q ue _ 
estaa na terra Da china Ja nom pode sair somemte senom he por p a out o s 
licem9a do Rey & por esta licemca se he Riq° fiq a sem nada/ & Regnosj / 
quallqr Junco ou naao que pasa os termos que lhe sam postos pa 
amcorar pdese a fazemda pa ellRey E a Jemte morre por yso// 

Comecamdo dos termos De cauchy pa a costa Da china ha fortale- lugares 
zas a pm a aynam honde se acha o aljofar que vay a chyna E nantoo 
E quantom E chamcheo E out°s somente Digamos De quamtom da chyna 
que he mor que todos E omde he o trato Destas ptes/ 
este aynam he emsseada e costa se Rio te huuas ilhas ao mar Perto 
omde se pesca o aljofar he gram ssoma delle & //. 

A cidade de quamtom he omde o Regno todo da china Descarregua 
suas mercadarias todas E asy da terra firme como do mar mujtas a 
cidade De quamtom he a boca da foz de huu gramde Rijo que tem 
De prea maar tres bracas & quat 0 / a cidade que se vee da foz esta 
asemtada em terra chaa sem momte tem toda a casaria De pedra & 

9erq a da de muro q dizem que he De sete bracas De larguo E outs a 
tamtas dalto E da bamda da cidade Dizem que he alcamtilado ysto 
dizem lu9oes q Ja alij estiuerom & tem portos homde estam mujtos 
JuncSs Gramdes vigiase a 9idade fechamse as portas sam fortes estes 
Reis q disemos que tem sellos quamdo mandam seus embaxadores 
fazem a mercadaria em a cidade Demtro E senom fazem fora obra 



Ylhas 
homde 
ancora 
os Juncos 
De 

malaq a j 


Man a dos 
capitaees 
da terra 
he mar em 
quam- 
tomll 


Fol. 1 6 iv . 


456 TOM^ PIRES 

de xxx ta leguoas De quamto & de qamtom lhe leuam a mercadaria 
De quamtom a cidade huus dize q ha quoat ro meses de amdadura 
E outs° dizem quoat ro E out°s asy a verdade he q em vinte dias a 
bom amdar podem amdar ho dito camjnho//. 

Aquem De quamtom pa malaq a trimta leguoas estam huuas Jlhas 
Junto com a terra firme de namtoo homde estam os portos Ja 
Detremjnados De cada na£ao .s. pulo tumon E out°s E tamto que 
os ditos Juncos ali amqora ho sdr de nantoo ho faz saber a quamtom 
& vem lloguo mercadores estimar a mercadoria & toma seus drrtos 
como se dira ao Diamte entam lhe trazem a mercadaria feita de 
huua pte he da outra tornase cada huu pa sua casa // 

Afirmam que todos os que trazem mercadarias De quamtom aas 
Jlhas ganha tres qat r0 cimquo p° dez E os chijs tern este costume 
asy por lhe nom tomarem a terra como po Receberem os drrtos 
das saidas Das mercadarias alem da emtrada E o pincipall he p° medo 
de lhe nom tomarem a cidade por que se diz q he Riq a cidade a de 
quantom he ve cosairos mujtas vezes Jumto com ella he capitam 
desta cidade hi taao p a pinylpall E cadano he huu capitam por hor- 
denamca Do Rey & nom pode mals estar haa out 0 capitam Do maar 
easy como ho da terra com Jurdicam sobre sy ambos sam mudados 
caDano //: 

Dizem que os chijs fezerom esta hordenam^a de nom podere hir 
a qmtom por Re?eo Dos Jaaos & malaios que he (jerto que huu Jumco 
Destas nafoees desbaratam vinte Juncos De chijs Dizem que a chyna 
he de mais De mjll Juncos que cada huu trata homde lhe bem vem 
mas he Jemte fraq a & segumdo ho medo que tern a malayos he 
Jaaos bem certo sera que huua naao De iiij e tonees faria despouoar 
qmtom a qll Despouoada teria a china gramde perda// 

Nom tiramdo a groria a cada terra bem parecem as cousas de 
chijna serem de terra homrrada & boa & Riqa mujto & pa o sojugar 
o guouernador De malaq a a obidiencia nosa avija mester nom tamto 
como Dizem por que he Jemte mujto fraca he ligeira De desbaratar 
E afirmam as p as capitaees que mujtas vezes forom la que com Dez 
naaos sojugaria ho goVrnador das Jmdias que tomou malaca toda 
ha china nas beiras Do maar// E a chijna pa as nosas naaos he viajem 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


de vinte dias ptem Daq na fym De Junho pa boa viagem e em xb 
Dias Jram com vemto De mougam Da chijna ha noua memte 
navegaca pa burney & dizem q vam laa em qnze dias & q Ysto sera 
sera De qujmze annos a esta pte//. 

A pimcipall mercadaria he pimemta De que comprara dez Juncos Merca- 

donas q 

cadanno se tamtos la fore De crauo noz pouq a pu?ho cacho mais va i em na 
algua cousa/ emcem?o compraram mujto Demtes Dalifamtes estanho china q 
lenho aloees de butiq a copara mujta camfora De burney comtaria ma i aq a 
Vrmelha samdallos brancos brasyll Jmfimdo paao do que na?e em 
syngapura preto compra mujtas alaqueqas De cambay a chamallotes 
escarlatas panos De laas De cores Deixamdo a p* a todo o all sam 
cousas De benese// 

Vam hos ditos Juncos De malaq a amcorar a Jlha de tumom como 
Ja he dito xx te ou xxx ta leguoas De quamtom estam estas Jlhas 
Junto com a terra De nantoo huua leguoa alamar Da terra firme alij 
amcora os De malaq a no porto de tumom & os de siam no porto De 
hucham o noso porto he mais perto pa a china tres leguoas q ho de 
syam E pmeiro vem as mercadarias a elle q hao out 0 // 

Ho sor De namtoo vemdo os Juncos faz lloguo sabr a quamtom 
como sam Juncos emtrados nas Jlhas saem hos estimadores de quan- 
tom a estimare as mercadorias Recebem seus drrtos trazem merca- 
daria tanta q abasta/ easy a terra estaa em costume De tamto valler 
tanto sabem De vos as mercadarias que queres E trazem as// 

De pimemta pagam vimte por cento De brasill cimq°emta por Drrtos 
fento & do pao de sijmgapura outro tamto & ysto estimado tamto aosmer _ 
podera ter huu Junco soldo a liura Recebem seus drrtos Das out a s cadores q 
mercadarias a dez por cemto E nom vos fazem apresam tern Vrda- vam . De 

1 1 mala- 

deiros mercadores em seus tratos sam gramdememte Riqos todo quaj/. 
seu emtemto he pimemta vemdem seus mamtimentos onesta memte 
Despachados tornase cada huu a sua terra a Jemte baixa he pouco 
cheguada a Vrdade E as cousas baixas de seus ofi9ios sam toDas 
falsas E comtra feitas // 

A china he o nome De cem cates chamase piquo entam fazes voso pesos da 
pre?o qmtos piquos De pimemta por huu de seda ou qmtos de tall c ^ ina 

ly f ClfflLiCj 

mercadarias por huu De p ta E asy hee E no almjzqr qmtos cates De &? peqnos 



tom£ pires 


458 

pimemta por huu dalmjzqr aljofar o picoll tem cem cates cada cate 

tem dezaseis taees cada taell tem Dez mazes cada maz tem dez pon/ 

m^^da ca< ^ a ca * e tem vimte & huua 0119a de noso peso cada trezemtos doze 

Roz tri- cates de vimte E huua 01119a fazem huu baar de malaq a Da Romaa 
guo carries pequena//: 
g as pesca- * ^ a 

dosl todas estas mercadarias se vemdem a peso .s. tamtos pesos de 

Fol. i62r. tall por huu De p ta & os mercadores quamdo a leuam haa na terra 

amtre elles tamtos pesos De tal mamtimemto por huu de caixas De 

fuseleira q corre na terra como ceitis E nas mercadorias gramdes & 

outs a compras ouro E prata p° moeda // 

Merca- A prim9ipall mercadaria da chyna he seda branq a crua em muj ta 

dortas q camtidade & sedas soltas De cores mujtas em camtidade 9etijs de 
vem da 

chyna. todallas cores damasqos emRolados de tauoleiro De todas as cores 
tafetas & out°s panos De seda Rallos a que chama xaas & dout a s 
sortes mujtos de todas corres aljofar gramde copia De diuersas 
fei9oes polla m 5 r parte Desyguall trazem tambem Redomdo E groso 
he esta a meu parecer he tan pincipall mercadaria na china como a 
seda posto que elles contam a seda por cabe9a de mercadoria/ 
almjzqr em poo & em papds mujto & bom certamemte/ que nom 
Deue nada ao de peguu // camfora De botica em gramde camtidade 
abarute pedra vme selitre emxofre cobre ferro Rujbarbo & todo nom 
vail nada / o que ate o presemte tenho visto vem podre Dizem q 
damtes vinha fresco eu o nom vy vasos de cobre de fuseleira tachos 
de ferro ffundido bacios bacias Destas cousas sem numero cofres 
avanos agulhas De cem maneiras Dellas muj t0 sStijs & bem obradas 
em abastan9a he boa mercadarja E cousas mujto De baixa sorte como 
de framdes vem a portugall manjlhas de cobre Jmfinjdas vem ouro 
& prata E nom vy mujto & brocados a sua gsa mujtos De porcelanas 
nom se fala no numero/ 

Destas cousas que da china vem dellas sam da terra da china dellas 
de fora he huuas de lugares nomeados mjlhores q dout°s Destas 
taes mercadarias empregaes nas q queres voso Dinheiro somemte no 
almjzqr nom se achatamto// Dizem que podera vijr cadano atee huu 
baar da china entodollos Juncos / tem gramde camtidade dacuqr 
aterra da china he bom// ay huu lugar q se chama xam9y e qe ha hy 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


459 

almizcar te pouco & bom (In the margin in the same hand:) “ a 9idade 
de q vee o almizqare se chama xanbu a qal he na chyna 8 c jj dize q e 
9an9y ha as alymaryas de q tir a o almizcare 
vem os ditos Juncos da china a malaq a E nom paguam Drrtos 
somemte presemte & estes presemtes asy os dam segumdo for 
hordenanca Dos xabamdares das taes na9oees xabamdar da china 
lequos & cauchy champa era o lasamane & deste oficio sam Riquos 
hos xabamdares porque Despeitam os mercadores gramdememte & 
por os ganhos serem grosos tudo seportam & tambem por a terra 
estar e costume de aasy fazer E ssoportar// 

Os postos das mercadorias a seda bramca crua he de chancheo sedas 
de cores de cauchy damasquos cetijs brocados xaas loos De namqim 
(In the margin in the same hand:) “ neste nanqm a todolos panos 
dalgoda& gramdes mercadores ha de peqim a nanqy por Rios hu 
mes damdura & ” & damqm aljofar de ayna camfora de botica De 
chamcheo & porque os postos nom satisfazem porque as taes merca- 
dorias te seu conhecimemto a v ta nom vou por aq mais disco rremdo// 
O sail he gramde mercadoria amtre os chijs Da china se espalha pa 
estas partidas & he trato De qujnhemtos Juncos que o vem comprar 
& da china se carrega pa out°s cabos sam os tratantes delle mujto 
Riquos E amtre sy dizem a out°s/ soes vos mercador de sal pa 
falardes //. 

Alem do porto de quantom esta outro porto que se chama oquem 
he amdadura p° terra De tres dias E por mar huu dia & huua noite 
este he o porto dos lequjos he Dout a s nacoees mujtos portos tern alem 
q sera largua cousa De comtar que ao presemte nom fazem em noso 
caso somemte atee qmtom porq esta he a chaue do Reino De chyna//. 

Dizem que na terra De china amda a Jemte da tartaria E chamanlhe 
tartall & a tall gemte he bramca mujto De barbas Ruyvas amdam a 
cavallo sam guerreiros he Dizem que da china vam a terra dos 
tartaros em dous meses & que na tartaria traze cavallos ferrados com 
ferraduras De cobre & ysto deue ser porq a chijna vaise estemdemdo 
a bamda Do norte E bombardeiros nosos Dizem que em alemanha 
ouuijrom Ja dizer daquella gemte & de huua cidade q hos chijs 
nomeam q se chama E que lhes pare9e q poderam hir pola tall via a 



Fol. i 62 v. 


la Ylha 
dos 

lequeosj 


460 TOME PIRES 

suas terras em pouco tempo & afirmano mas a terra por Rezam do frio 
Dizem q he despouoada ha certos lugares amtre os chijs & os tartaros 
sam os guores & despois da tartaria Roxia dize os chijs//. 

E porquamto alem da china na terra Firme nom se sabe ao 
presemte aq rrtais terras com q malaca trate fa?o pomto 1 (...direij 
das ...nas as qaes ...e cam5y & ...s// & as ...adamasca ...faze em 
cauchy chyna & di ve a malaqa ...outro cus ...a se n 5 fa ...uns dize 
...ze de pedra ...re outros ...e fazem ...a q ...pedra q he ...& branca 
e o ...e// & as ...as de por9e ...finas como ...s & lou^a ...te se faze 
...de forma ...//) daquj por diamte se falara das Jlhas & somente 
daquelas com que malaca navegua porque se de todas ouuese de 
dizer nunca acabaria por Rezam da ymfynjdade delas / E aguora se 
dira dos lequjos & Jampom burneus & lu?oees // 

Os lequeos chamanse guores por quallqr destes nomes sam conhe- 
9idos lequios he o pn9ipall he o Rey gemtijo & toda a gemte/ he 
vasallo do Rey dos chijs trebutarjo/ a Jlha sua he gramde he de 
mujta Jemte tern nauetas pequenas a sua guisa Juncos tern tres ou 
quoatro q comtinoamemte compam na chyna E nom tern mais trata 
na china e em malaq a E as vezes em companhia dos chijs/ as vezes 
por sy na chijna tratam no porto de foqem q he na terra da chijna 
Junto De quamtom nauega9am De huu dia & huua noyte Dizem os 
malaios aa gemte De malaca que de purtugueses he llequjos nom 
ha defere9a somemte que os purtugueses compram molheres o que 
os leqos nom faze//. 

os lequjos tem em sua terra somemte triguo E aRoz & vinhos a 
sua gijsa carnees pescados em gramde avomdan9a sao homees 
gramdes debuxadores he arm ros fazem os cofres dourados avanos 
mujto Riquos & bem obrados espadas mujtas armas de todas sortes 
a sua guisa asy como falamos e nosos Regnos em mjlam falam os chijs 
& todas na9oees nos lequjos sam homees de mujta Vrdade nom 
compam espauos/ nem vemdem huu homem dos seus por todo o 
mundo E sobre ysto poderam morrer // 

1 A line here marks the beginning of an addition (between brackets above) 
to the text, which is written in the margin, in the same hand. The codex was 
badly cropped in binding, part of the words having been cut away. 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


Sam os lequjos Jdolatrios se nauegam & se acham em fortuna 
dizem q escapaDo compram huua mofa fremosa pa sacreficio & 
deguolana na proa do Jumqo com out a s cousas semelhantes a estas 
sam homees bramquos bem vestidos melhor que os chijs mais 
autorizados nauegam estes na china & trazem as mercadorias q 
vao de malaq a a china & vam a Jampon que he Jlha de sete oito dias 
de nauega9am e Resgatam ouro cobre que ha na dita Jlha polas 
mercadorias sam os leqos homes q liberallmemte fiam sua merca- 
daria E ao Recadar se lhe memtem aRecadana com a espada na 
ma 5 o// 

A pincipall he ouro cobre & armas de todas sortes cofres caxonjas 
de folhajes douro avanos triguo E ssuas cousas sam bem obradas 
ouro trazem mujto sam homees De Vrdade mais que os chijs he 
temjdos trazem gramde soma de papell & seda de cores traze 
Almjzqr por^elanas Damasquos trazem cebolas & legumes 
mujtos//: 

leuam as mercadarias que os chijs leuam partem daquj em [blank] 
E cadano vem a malaca huu dous tres Juncos & leuam mujta Roup a 
de bemgalla 

Amtre os lequjos he mujto estimado o v° de malaq a carregam 
delle gramdememte de huu q he como agoa ardemte com que os 
malayos se fazem amoquos trazem os lequjos espadas de prefo de 
trinta cz dos cada huua & destas mujtas// 

A Jlha de Jampom segundo todos os chijs dizem que he moor que 
a dos lequios & o Rey mais poderoso & maior & nom he dado a 
mercadaria nem seus naturaes he Rey gemtio vasallo do Rey da 
china tratam na chijna poucas vezes por ser lomge & elles nom tere 
Juncos nem serem homees do maar//. 

os lequjos em sete oito dias vam a Jampon & levam das ditas 
mercadorias he Resgatam ouro & cobre todo o que vem dos lequeos 
trazem os leqos de Jampon he tratam os lequeos com os de Jampon 
em panos lucoees & out a s mercadorias/ 

Burney sam mujtas Jlhas grandes & pequenas cassy todas sam de 
Jemtios somente a primcipall he de mouros ha pouco tempo que ho 
Rey he mouro pare9em homes De mercadoria os mercadores sam 


Ylha de 
Jampon 



tom£ pires 


homees meaos nom mujto agudos estes tratam Dritamemte a malaq a 
cadano he terra abastada de carnes pescados arroz & ?aguu // 

trazem ovro E mujto baixo em qujlates mais que todo outro destas 
partes trazem camfora cadano atee dous tres baares De mujta valia 
vail o cate Dela segumdo he grosa ha cate de doze cz dos atee xxx ta 
coremta Descoremdo por suas sortes & bomdades tern em sua terra 
mujtos mjrabulanos qebulos que trazem avemder//. trazem ?era mell 
aRoz he 9agu he mantimemto Da Jemte baixa he mjollo de pao/ feito a 
maneira de comfeitos E vail/ trazem orracas //. Nom pagam em malaq a 
drrtos pagam presente que la vay teer porque quern tern carrego de os 
apresetar que o xabamdar elle Ihe ordena o presemte que dam//: 
Leuam Roup a dos qujlijs & de bemgala .s. panos emrrolados de 
ladrilho purauaas de sortes synabafos de toda sort e/ pamchaujlizes 
i synhavas leuam manjlhas De latom da chyna leuam matamumguo 
De cambay a mujto De cores E comtas margaridas peguntam por 
comtaria Vrmelha & com estas vam polas Jlhas Domde ha o ouro E 
Resgatonno polios panos & somete pola comtarja// 
tem cadanno duas mou 95 ees pa vijr E out a s duas pa hijr vam De 
malaq a a burney em huu mees E tornam em outro os seus Junqos 
parecem os burneos homees mamsos//: 

Hos lu9oees sam alem de burney obra De dez Dias de nauega9am 
sam easy todos Jemtios no tem Rey somemte Regemse polios mais 
velhos em cabillas he gemte Rabusta de pouq a vallya Em malaqua 
nom tem Juncos atee Dous tres trazem as mercadorias a burney & 
daly ve a malaq a // 

Os burneos vam as terras dos lu9oees Resgatar ouro E out°s 
mantimemtos E o ouro q trazem a malaca he dos lu9oees & das out 8 ® 
Jlhas Darredor q sam sem comto & todos tem trato De huuas as 
outras pouquo ou mujto E p estas Jlhas q tratam tem ouro De baixa 
sorte E muyto bayxa// 

Tem os lu9oees em sua terra mujtos mamtimemtos E 9era mell 
leuam daq as mercadorias que levam os burneos he easy a Jemte 
huua & em malaq a / nom tem apartamento antre sy Em malaq 8, nom 
esteuerom nunca como aguora somemte ho tomunguo q aq fez o 
goVrnador das Jmdias comecava Ja a Juntar mujtos delles he faziam 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


463 

Ja casas & asetos gramdememte he gemte proueitosa sam traba- 
lhadores//. Desta Jeracam ha aguora em malaq a os fs° do tumunguo 
E sua molher E sogra & curia Raja & tuam brajy que casou com a 
molher do tumunguo// 

Em minjam avera qujnhemtos lu?oees Delles homees homrrados & 
boos mercadores q Desejam vijr a malaq a E nom lhe dam licem9a os 
De mjjam por que aguora se detremjnarom a bamda Do Rey que 
foy De malaca nom mujto descubertamemte Sam malaios os de 
mjmjam // 

E o porq da terra firme he comtado Des cambay a atee chyna & 
dalguuas Jlhas Jumto com a chijna aguora comecarey a comtar Da 
gramde Jlha de comotora faze Do ho camjnho De malaca atee maluq °/ / 

A primeira sera a Jlha de comotora E aRedor de gamispola pola 
bamda Do canaall & tornar polla banda De panchar atee gamispola//. 

E despois sera o Recomtam to Da Jlha De Jaaoa & do Regno de 
9umda decrarado os portos E sres delles/ Juncos & pamgajavas q 
ha em cada huu// 

E despois da Jlha de solor & de tymor & de byma cimdaua 9apee/ 

& despois Jmdo pa maluq 0 //. ect// 

Discri9am ou Recomtamemto Da gramde Riqua he populosa Ylha Fol. 163V. 
De camotora & das Jlhas q Daredor dela estam E falarsea Della ao 
rredor toda comecamdo De gamispolla polio canall E tornamdo por 
pamchur a gamispola. E comtarey primeiro quamtos Reinos tern 
Despois ha maneira de cada huu & o trato & q mercadarias ha na 
dita Jlha E quam gramde hee E o que ha de lamcharas & Jumcos/ 

Comecamdo de gamispola he o Regno dachei E biar lambry ho Regnos na 
Regno de pedir ho Regno De pirada ho Regno de pa9ee o Regno De 3 lha de 
bata ho Regno Daruu ho Regno De darcat ho Regno de Rupat o comotora 
Regno De ciac ho Regno De campar o Reyno De tuncall o Regno 
damdargery o Regno De capocam ho Regno de trimtall o Regno De 
Jamby o Regno De palimbao as terras De 9a9anpom tulimbavam 
andallos piijaman tiquo panchur baruez chinqele mancopa Daya 
pirim este comfyna com lambry E com as Jlhas q estam Junto com 
gamjspolla E de ciac ate Jamby E da outra parte De piriman ate 
panchur he a terra De menamcabo que tern tres Reis estes sam no 



Ylhas que 
fazem canall 
Des campar 
atheepalim- 
bao por horn- 
de se nauega 
para Jaaoa 
bamDam 
malucojj. 

Estas sam as 
merca dorias 
que tem a 
Jlha De 
camatora 
naturaes Da 
propria 
Ylhall 

Mamtimen- 
tos Da terra. 


Seitas E 
creemfas 
Da Ilha de 
fomotora// 


Fol. i 64 r. 
de malaqa 


464 TOM ^ PIRES 

sertaao Da ylha E nesta terra De menamcabo ha huu maar Daguoa 
Dofe como se dira qmdo se falar De menacabo// 

Pullo pi?am cariman Jlhas Dos 9elates que se chamam 9elaguym 
gim sabam buaya linga tigua pullo baralam bamca E monomby Destes 
se dira em seu lugar//. 

Tem ouro em mujta camtidade camfora de comer De duas ma- 
neiras pimemta seda beijoym lenho aloes De butica tem mell 9era 
breu emxufre algodam mujtas Rotaas que sam canas de que fazem 
estrees serue como cairo ou esparto & serue De fijo com que atam 
todallas coussas 

Tem mujto aRoz bramco & por pillar tem mujtas carnes E 
pescados amtre os qees ha Savees em camtidade como azamor tem 
azeites vinhos mujtos a sua guisa antre os qes ha tampoy como ho 
noso vinho easy tem fruytas em gramde numero amtre as quaaes 
sam os fremosos E gostosos Durjoees mais q todas out a s fruytas sem 
Duujda// 

Na Jlha de comotora alguus Reis sam mouros os mais E alguus sam 
Jemtios he na trra Dos Jemtios alguus homees custumam comer 
Dos JmiguSs quamdo os toma os Rex Da bamda Do canall Dachey 
atee palimbao sam mouros & os De palimbam tomamdo a gamjspola 
gemtios pola mor parte & os do sertaao E que viuem Demtro sam 
gemtios//. 

Este he o prim9ipio da pouoacam de malaq a por Diuersos autores 
E a verdade se decrara do q se mais afirma / 

Segumdo opinjam dos Jaaoos dizem malaq a ser pouoada nesta 
maneira a quail elles tem em coronjqua sua E o vereficam gramde 
memte. Afirmam os Jaaoos aver em Jaoa na era de mjll & trezemtos 
& sesemta annos trazemdo sua comta a nosa huu Rey na Jaaoa que se 
chamaua Raja quda que qr dizer Rey dos cavallos o quail fez huu filho 
que se chamaua Raja baya ou por out 0 nome/ sam agy Jaya baya que 
na linguoagem de Jaaoa quer dizer sor gramde de pouoos este ouue 
huu f° que se chamou sam AJy dandan gimdoz que qr Dizer na dita 
limguoajem moor que seus amtecesores/ & este ouue huu f° que se 
chamou sam ajy Jaya taton que quer dizer s 5 r de todos. 

Este Sam ajy Jaya caton morreo sem filhos E o pouo Jumto ajum- 



PLATE XXXIX 



Rodrigues’ map (fol. 25) showing St. Helena and Tristan da Cunha 

Islands (p. 520) 




PLATE XL 



Rodrigues’ map (fol. 114) of the Western Mediterranean 


PORTUGUESE TEXT 


465 

toil dos pimfipaees mandaris E fezerom him Rey & mudaronlhe o 
nome/ de Sam ajy & chamouse batara que quer Dizer Rey limpo 

Este batara tamarill fez huu filho a que chamarom biatara curipan 
q socedeo ho Reino Da Jaoa no tempo Deste se aleuamtou*/ o quarto 
da terra Da Jaoa. E aleuamtou huu mamdarj E chamouse biatara 
caripanam ?uda como se dira em seu luguar//. 

Este batara caripan em cujo tempo se perdeo o quarto da terra de 
Ja5a ouue huu f° que so 9 edeo em seu luguar que Despois se chamou 
bataram matara e este foy gramde Justifoso //. 

E este fez huu f° que chamarom bataram Sinagara e este dizem 
que foy doudo & foy dado o Regno a huu seu filho que se chamava 
como ho dono bataram matara este batara mataram fez huu filho que 
aguora e noso tempo Regna em Jaaoa que se chama batara vigiaja/ 
que quer dizer o Rey gramde sesudo cujo capitam he o gustipate 
como se tratara largamemte na descr^am da Jaooa •//. 

Dizem os Jaaos q no tempo do batara tomarjll Rey das terras & 
s5r Das Jlhas tinha por trebutarios sam agy simgapura que era Rey 
daquelle canall seu tributario & vasallo / E avera da Jaaoa a simgapura 
duzemtas & R ta leguoas pamtre Jlhas//. 

E q asy era sam agi palimbaao que qr Dizer o s5r De tudo seu 
vasallo trebutario E avera De palimbaao a Ja5a ?em leguoas/ E easy 
golfom he ysto na parte mais lomge porq na mais perto comfynamdo 
com 9 unda Avera vijmte leguoas/. 

E era seu vasallo tributario sam agy tamjompura. que qr Dizer 
sor Das pedras E avera da Jaaoa a tamjompura setemta leguoas esta 
he a terra dos diamates 

Morto sam agi palimbaao ficou huu filho seu gramde caval r0 & 
omem muyto guerreiro a que chamavam paramjeura/ que qr dizer na 
lingoaje de Jaa5a palimbaao q he mais ousado era casado com huua 
sobrinha Do batara tamarill/ que se chamaua paramjeure o quail 
como se vijo tarn nobrememte casado E que senhoreava nas Jlhas 
gramdememte que comfinauam com elle & eram da obidiem 9 ia de 
seu cunhado alevamtou ha vasalajem & obidiem 9 ia E chamouse o 
gramde Jsemto //. 

Auemdo a tall noua batara tamarill Rey da Jaada como sam agy Fol. 164V. 

Q H.C.S. II. 



466 tom£ pires 

palimbao mudara ho nome & se chamaua para mj9ura que qr Dizer 
Jsemto detremjnou com seu poder E ajuda dellRRey de tamjompura 
hir sobrelle & tomarlha terra De palimbaoo E o matarem & destroi- 
rem & 

Ysto acordado Jumtou sua Jemte em naujos & deu sobre a Jlha de 
bamca q esta Jumto com palimbaao E a destroyo omde diz q matou 
todos por q era gemte de palimbaao E que mataria na dita ylha mjll 
moradores & daly foy a palimbaao que sera huua leguoa ou duas & 
comecou desbaratar os lugares E quamdo paramj^ura Rey de palim- 
baao isto vijo ajumtou e Jumqos & lamcharas obra de mjll omees com 
suas molheres e embarquoos & elle fiquou com obra de seis mjll 
omees em terra pa daar batalha ao Rey de Jaaoa seu cunhado //. 

Emtrados na batalha de parte a parte foy fogimdo paramj^ura E 
Recolheose aos Juncos & frota que tinha no Rijo E ficoulhe toda a 
Jemte q tinha pa se Defemder em poder Do cunhado & somemte a 
gemte q tinha embarquada com elle/ naveguou a symgapura homde 
cheguou com seus Juncos & Jemte domde foy Recebido do sam agy 
symgapura. E pousarom ambos & 

E do dia de sua cheguada a oito dias foy morto ho sam agy de 
symgapura. p° ymdustria de paramj?ura E ficou ho canall E pouoa- 
coes a obidiemcia de paramygura. E era sor de tudo E guouemaua o 
canall & Jlhas q podia aver & aquerir p° sua ymdustria a sua maao 
& Regra a terra em Justiga E nom tinha trato alguu somemte semeava 
sua Jemte aRoz & pescauam & Roubaua dos Jmigos & disto viujam 
no dito canall de symgapura//. 

E ellRey de siom que era sogro do sam agy de symgapura casado 
com huua sua fy a De huua manceba sua. ffylha de huu primcipall 
mamdarj de patane// qmdo ouujo as nouas de seu Jenrro detremjnou 
De vijr sobre elle & fez ajuntamemto De Jemte E fex capitam mor 
o dito mamdari pay da molher do sam agy de symgapura o quail veio 
tarn poderoso que o dito paramj9ura nom ousou de o espera E fogijo 
com obra De mjll homees E meteose no Rijo De muar & avija 9imq° 
annos q estaua e symgapura.// 

Como o dito paramj9ura emtrou em muar com sua molher paramj- 
9ure he com mjll homees come90u a talhar matos & fazer campos 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


467 


pramtar arvores & fazer dufoees E qujmtaas pa seu soportamemto 
homde esteue seis annos E alij pramtaua cousas de sua vida & 
pescavam & as vezes furtaua & Roubaua champanas q vinham tomar 
auga doce ao Rijo De muar q vynham com Junqos da Jaoaa E da 
china como se dira na descricam de cada terra qmdo Nauegava & 
pa omde //. 

Em este meyo tempo asy do Regno de batara tumanlll Rey de 
Jaaoa & das Jlhas mujtas em cujo tempo estaua// paramjcure fogido 
palimbao e muar como de sua fortuna avemos Recomtado / morava em 
malaq a a gemte de que agora diremos pa virmos ao fundamemto de 
malaq a E a sua amtigidade & de q gemte foy pouoada primeiro //. 

Neste tempo & segumdo verdade da estoria dos Jaaoos E asy se 
afirma agora polios malaios & todas gera^oees comarcaas/ qmdo os 
9elates q sam cosairos e pequenas barcas sotljs como diremos e seu 
titollo qmdo se delles falar sam homees q em suas barcas amdam a 
furtar & pescam & andam asy ora em terra ora no maar dos qaees 
Jmda agora e noso tpo ha gnde copia/ | trazem zervatanas com suas Fol. 16 5r. 
seetas sotijs derva de besteiro que se avemtam sage matam como 
fezerom aos nosos purtugueses muytas vezes na empresa he Des- 
truisam da famosa cidade De malaq a muyto nomeada amtre as na^Ses 

Estes celates bajuus homees q veviam Jumto com symgapura 
he tambem Jumto com palimbam qmdo o paramj^ura fogijo de 
palimbam elles seguirom sua companhia E andauam delles trimta 
Jumtos sostemdo sua vida/ no/ tempo q ho paramj^ura esteue e 
palimbao serviam de Pescadores despois de vymdos a symgapura 
elles moravam e carjmam Jlha Jumto com ho canaall & no tempo que 
o dito paramj^ura veyo a muar vierom estes trimta a viuer homde 
aguora se chama malaq a que avera de muar ao lugar de malaq a 
cinq 0 leguoas /. 

Viuemdo estes celates E ladroees que aas vezes pescaua pa seu 
soportam to com suas cho^as em terra E ssuas molheres & filhos 
Jumto com ho momte que aguora se chama malaq a homde esta a 
famosa fortaleza de malaq a ho tempo q paramj^ura vivia em muar 
estes celates eram sabedores da terra como homees que andauam 
esperamdo vida pa seu Repouso pescava no Rijo q corre pllo pee da 



468 tom£ pires 

fortaleza / p espa90 de quoatro ou cimq° annos & comjam & dhy 
buscavam sua vida/. 

Amdamdo estes mujtas vezes polio dito Rijo de malaq a pescamdo 
huua leguoa/ afastados do mar & duas virom huu lugar gramde e 
espa50so de gramdes campos fremosas agudas & virom como tall 
lugar era desposto pa gramde povoacam & se podia nelle semear 
gramdes campos darroz pramtar qintaas pa$er guaados as vezes 
custumaua De leuar laa suas molheres & fylhos & ahy Recriavam 
suas p as E detremjnauam De alij fazer seu asemto he poseronlhe 
nome bietam q na limguoagem dos celates qr dizer campo estemdido /. 

E amtes que se pasasem pa o dito lugar detremjnarom todos acor- 
dados De fazer saber a paramj^ura que estava em muar q mamdase 
ver ho dito luguar se lhe paregia ser pa elle conuenjemte & nom 
estar e muar porq nom tinha la tarn boa estampia E quamdo forom 
todos fazerlhe esta fala levaronlhe huu cesto de fruyta he hua aruore 
q estaua Jumto com as casas dos Relates ao pee do momte omde ora 
esta a fortalez a a quaall o dito paramj9ure Re9ebeo com pazer dos 
ditos celates E lhes pregumtou a q vinham e elles lhe dixerom o que 
acordado o tinham acerq a De lhe fazer saber do dito lug r De bjetam 
se se queria mudar pa elle q lhes parecia a elles b 5 m lugar honde 0 
dito sor poderia Repousar •/. 

Dixe o dito paramj9ura aos 9elates Ja sabees q em nosa limguoaje 
ho homem q foge se chama malayo E pois amjm fogido trazes taall 
fruyta chamese a ese lugar malaq a que qr Dizer furtado fogido E pois 
vosa temcam foy tall que quisestes buscar luguar pa meu Repouso eu 
o mamdarey Vr & se for tall eu me pasarey a elle com mjnha molher 
& casa & deixarey e muar a qarta parte de mjnha gemte pa se 
aproueitare da terra em q tamto trabalho todos temos leuado e a 
amansar//: 

Respomderom os celates nos tambem somos de teu senhorio 
amtiguo de palimbam sempre amdamos comtiguo se te a terra 
parecer boa he Reza q nos fa9as esmolla De nosas boas vomtades E 
noso trabalho nom seja sem gualardam Diselhes o paramjcura que 
Fol. 165V. asy seria & os | gelates pamte todos diserom que se a terra lhe 
parecese bem & se a ella q ! sese pasar q se fezese E chamase Rey por 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 469 

tall que lhes podese a elles dar homrra & esmolla ofreceose elle a yso 
& dise q asy era sua vomtade fazerlhes/ 

Mamdou o dito paramjcura ver o dito luguar De bjetao polio Rijo 
acima por p as q pa iso hordenou E virom o dito campo cercado De 
fremosas serras & gramdes agoas cercado do Rijo q vem teer a 
malaq a De mujtas avees alijmarias domde ha lijoes tigres & out a s 
De diuersas feicoees como De fejto nom he duujda em gramde 
partida se achar tam fremoso campo q dure tres ou quoatro leguoas 
& aguora tam aproueitado do quaall os q ho forom Vr ficarom mujto 
comtetes E asy o diserom ao dito paramjcura e elle ouue gramde 
pzer E toda sua Jemte pa viuerem mais a sua vomtade larga memte-/. 

Mudado o dito paramjcura ao dito luguar de bretao E Repousado 
comecamdo ha aproueitar a terra E della gostamdo os celates forom a 
elle que Ja emtam nom eram mais q dezoito E lhe diserom se era 
lembrado como elles forom eventores da dita terra & com desejo 
De seu Repouso elles Deixara suas molheres & fs° & se forom amuar 
a fazerlhe saber de tall lugar homde Ja estaua gozamdo q lhe pidiam 
que comprise em lhes fazer mercee Dalguua esmola Domrra a qll 
piti?am o dito paramjcura os fez mamdaris que qr Dizer fidallguos 
a elles & seus fs° E molheres Dalij pa sempre domde ficarom asy q 
todos os mamdaris de malaca vem destes E os Rex das partes de suas 
mais seg° na terra se afirma// 

Feitos por maao Do dito paramjcura os ditos Pescadores mamdaris 
acompanharom sempre o dito Rey E asy como o dito Rey os acrecem- 
tou em fidalgia elles tambem Reconhecerom ha mercee que lhes fora 
feita acompanharom gramdememte o Rey E o serujrom com gramde 
fee & lealldade De bom coracam sua amjzade & desta maneira senpre 
o amor Do Rey acerq a Delies como ho Vrdadeiro srvico E zello que 
os ditos nouos mamdarys tinham E trabalhauam de o comprazer & 
durou sempre sua honrra atee a vimda de dioguo llopez de sequeira a 
malaq a que o qujmto neto defies era ho lasaman a E o bemdara que 
ordenou a treicam sobre o dito dioguo lopez de sequeira que despois 
morreo deguolado as maaos do Rey que perDeo malaq a porque a 
Justica de ds E treicoees ao Rey feitas nunq a se pdem nem vam sem 
o castiguo// : 



47 O TOM ^ PIRES 

Morremdo o dito paramjgura no dito lugar do bretao asaz a seu 
comtemtamemto em lugar tam fresco & de tamto vigo & de tam boa 
vida como oje em dia se podera veer quem vier a malaq a que certo 
he huua cousa das do mundo he fremosos vergeus daruores & 
sombras m tas fruitas gramdes aguoas doges que procedem da serra 
dos emcatados que estaa a vista de malaq a segumdo afirmam os 
naturaees De gramdes momtarias dalifamtes brauos mujtos de 
lioees de tigres he Doutros anjmaaos mostruosos E alijmarias de 
casa nom como as nosas somemte servos//. 

temdo este paramjcura huu Filho que ouue em symgapura q era 
Ja easy homem casado com a filha primcipall dos mamdaris fidalguos 
que Damtes foram gelates que se chamaua o filho/ chaquem daraxa 
Fol. i66r. andando | A caga no dito lugar do bretam com quaees como acos- 
tumaua cada dia he as mais vezes huu dia veyo Depos os caees E 
gualguos que ha nestas partes mujto boos E vinham os ditos caees 
corremdo Depos huua alymaria como lebre que tem os pees De 
gamjto E o rrabo curto das qees alimarias os caees matauam cada dia 
Dez doze vimdo asy depos ella athee chegar ao maar sobre o momte 
de malaq a omde ora esta a fortalez a dellRey noso sor tamto q se a 
dita alj maria vijo sobre o momte virou aos caees & elles comecarom 
a fugir / quamdo o dito xaquem daraxa vio tal cousa & q a dita alj- 
maria Recobrara taees forgas sobre o momte pareceolhe out a cousa 
E tomouse pa bretam omde seu pay estava a comtarlho dizendo ao 
dito paramjgura seu pay / sor eu oje Jmdo a caga fuy depos huua 
lebre athee o momte dos vosos mamdaris homde ha a fruita dos 
malayos & alij a lebre sobre o momte virou ou porq o mar tocava 
no pee do monte ou por alij cobrar forgas E todos meus caees se 
tornarom fugimdo & pois q*daquellas aljmarias elles matauam cada 
dia dez doze como foy aqla poderosa pa se defemder todollos caees 
sem se podere a ella cheguar he porq ysto nom he sem alguu mjsterio 
vos venho comtar ysto & Roguovos sor q vades Vr este momte & 
veremos se achamos alij out a vez esta alimaria E se vos quiserdes q 
eu alij faga mjnha morada eu folgarey mujto//. 

Ho paramjgura Nom qujs Agrauar ho filho E foy laa & Jmdo por 
sua guja amostramdo ho camjnho o seu gramde mamdarj sogro de 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 471 

seu £° por causa do espeso arvoredo que ha do dito bretao ao momte 
De malaq a como oje ha posto que nom seja mais de duas leguoas E 
cheguamdo o Rey vijo tres momtes quasy Jumtos a tres & a quatro 
tiros de beesta depojada .s. o momte de boqua china De fermosas 
augas & muj do?es & o momte dos alacras que he na bamda De tuam 
colaxcar mouro Jaao & o momte Daljmaria homde ora esta a fortalez 3, 
famosa / dixe o paramj?ura a seu filho xaquem daxa omde queres teer 
asemto & o f° lhe dise que neste momte De malaq a dixe o pay que 
asy fose he fez no dito tempo suas casas no momte em 9ima homde 
atee o presemte tempo foy morrada E asemto dos Reis de malaq a //. 

Asemtado no dito momte o dito xaqem darxa com muj Riqas 
casas a guisa da terra sobre o momte & no chaoo dalem da pomte 
omde ora estam os gudoees dos almoxerifes// o asemto de seu sogro 
c 5 obra de trezemtos moradores & outs 0 estaua no bretam com seu 
pay trabalhaua De pouoar malaq a qmto podia comecava a vijr Jente da 
bamda daruu/ E douts 0 lugares homees como celates ladroees & 
outs 0 Pescadores em tamto q se fez malaq a do tempo de sua estada 
a tres annos lugar de dous mjll vizinhos E siam mamdaualhe aRozes//. 

Em este tempo adoe?eo paramj?ura he morreo fiquou ho Regno 
ha seu filho/ xaquem darxa E mamdou a Jemte do bretam vijr som te 
deixou la homees como caseiros & deu por asemto aos 9elates mam- 
daris todos a frallda Do momte De malaca pa sua guarda como athe 
o presemte athee a tomada de malaq a hos ditos lugares eram dos 
ditos mamdaris E caval ros que tinham a guarda de sua p a e este 
trabalhaua p° pouoar a terra fazija Justi9a polio qll vinha doutas 
ptes alij viuer & pouoar/. 

Asy que morto ho paramj9ura E feito Rey seu filho xaquem darxa Fol. i66v. 
Jaa com seis mjll vizinhos em malaca mamdou huu seu cunhado a 
syam co embaixada E mamdoulhe dizer como elle por caso fortuito 
viera teer aqella terra homde tinha tamto trabalho leuado que lhe 
pedia q senp lhe acudise com mamtimemtos por seu dr° que a terra 
era sua & q ele seria sempre em conhecimeto como home q viuja e 
sua terra E que lhe ajudase a pouoar a terra q era sua// 

Ho dito Rey de siam lhe mamdou Jemte E mamtimemtos merca- 
darias de sua terra Dizemdo que asy folgaua de se pouoar E que elle 



472 TOME PIRES 

o ajudaria aproueytamdose a terra como dezija / fynall memte que o 
embaxador foy tanbem despachado E veio com tam bom Recado 
que o xaquemdarxa. deu de mercee ao dito embaixador. q era seu 
cunhado que de sua Jeracam fosem os embayxadores E nom de out a 
dalij em diamte como se costumou atee o presente dia da tomada de 
malaq a pllos portugueses & nom podia ser embaixador senom de 
taall Jeracam E os embaixadores de malaq a nom som mais poderosos 
que apresemtar as cartas nom podem out a cousa dizer nem fazer como 
eu mujtas vezes vy em suas embaixadas por asy ser costume// 

AJmda neste tempo Regnaua em Jaaoa batara tamarill Rey de 
Jaaoa ao quail o dito xaquemdarxa mamdou embaxador pedimdolhe 
q Ja seu pay era morto q lhe Rogaua que fosem amiguos & as di- 
feremcas pasadas acabasem & pois lhe tinha a terra de palimbao 
que dalij p° diate quisese tratar em sua terra E que alij poderia 
despejar suas mercadarias E que sua terra se Jria gramdememte 
pouoamdo E cada vez seria mais por quamto tinha sabido que asy 
avia de ser & o tinha espirimetado por dez annos que alij faziam fim 
as mou?oees de huu cabo & do out 0 E que com menos Risq 0 pode- 
riam nauegar seus Junqos por causa dos baixos q avija pa paefe & 
pa outs 0 lugares omde sua Jemte & pouoo navegaua E que lhe 
Rogaua q asy o fezese// 

Respomdeo o Rey da Jaaoa batara tumarill que avia gramdes 
tempos q seus Juncos nauegavam em pafee E que era mujto liado 
com elle em amizade homde seus mercadores Recebiam boos 
Retomos de suas mercadarias he homrra e eram franqueados E 
asy vasallo o dito Rey de pa?ee seu que elle mamdase laa se asy fose 
sua vomtade q dout a maneira elle nom faria ho comtiro por que 
nom avia de quebrar ho costume tam amtiguo como amtre elles era 
acordado tanto tempo avija//. 

tornado o dito embaixador trouxe sua Reposta polio quail o dito 
Rey xaque darxa mamdou Recado ao Rey de pagee pedimdolhe que 
elle quisese dar luguar he nom aver por mall que Jaoa tratase em 
malaq a & que a elle asy o Rogaua q quisese mamdar seus mercaddres 
a malaq a com mercadorias dizemdo q em sua terra avija ouro para 
Retorno E que sua terra seria mayor ao que comprise ao dito Rey 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


473 

de pacee & que elle espeuera ao Rey da Jaaoa & q lhe Respomder a 
se sua vomtade fose q lhe aprazeua muyto// Ao quaall o dito Rey 
de pacee mamdou embaxadores ao dito xaquendarxa dizemdo que 
elle era comtemte dboa vomtade ao que elle pedia congederlho | se Fol. i 6 jr. 
elle quisese tornarse mouro E do que detremjnase lho mamdase 
dizer Jnteiram te pa fazer prestes sua vomtade/ ho dito Rey xaquem 
darxa nom Recebeo bem os embayxadores que de pacee vierom E 
os premdeo & Reteve no bretao gramde tempo rretemdo fazemdo 
lhes bom trato E mujtas vezes vinham pesoas omrradas de pa9ee 
com Recados ao dito Rey de malaq a asij sobre a soltura dos embaixa- 
dores como certeficarse da terra E como a noua pouoacam se fizera 
tarn prestes tamanha posto que o pmcipall asemto era no bretao 
homde se elle hija Recriar o que se fez sempre athee o dia de sua 
tomada // 

Reformouse gramdememte em amizade casij vasallo com batara 
tumarill Rey da Jaaoa por Rezam dos mujtos Juncos & forte gemte 
da terra q emtam navegauam gramdes partidas como se dira na 
descri^a Da Jaoa & sempre lhe mandaua alifamtes E dadiuas polio 
quail sem embarguo do Rey de pacee comsentlr alguus Juncos vi- 
nham a malaq a posto q fose pouca cousa porq a escala era toda e 
pa9ee das mercadorias como se dira qmdo se tratar da Jlha de como- 
tora & das cousas de pa9 ee// 

Acabados tres annos ho dito xaquem darxa deixou tornar os 
embaixadores a pa9ee homrrada memte & fezerom os Rex amjzade 
E tratauam de pacee e malaq a he alguus mercadores mouros Riquos 
se mudarom de pacee a malaq a asy parses como bemgalas & mouros 
arabios que destas tres Na9oees avija naquelle tep° gramde suma De 
mercadores E muj Riquos de grosos tratos & fazemdas e eram es- 
tamtes alij das Ditas partes fazemdo suas mercadorias E asy vijmdos 
trouxerom comsiguo moulanas & ca9izes letrados na seita de ma- 
famede pincipalm te arabios q nestas partes sam estimados no saber 
da dita seita-//- 

chegados hos ditos mercadores diserom ao dito Rey xaquem darxar 
que tinha sabido de sua Justica & misericordia q vsara com os de 
pa9ee e pois eram amigos os Reis q elles queriam tratar de pacee em 



474 TOME PIRES 

malaq a E queriam vijr a terra & se se nela podese fazer mercadoria 
E se abrise camjnho q estariam nella E pagariam os drrtos que 
hordenasem por quamto lhes dizia q a Jemte da Jaoa queria tratar 
E vijr com mercadarias q elles aviam mester q era crauo ma?as noz 
& samdallos p°q neste tempo era do trato da Jaoa como se dira qmdo 
se tratar da Jlha de Jaaoa//. 

Ho dito Rey xaquemdarxa folguou mujto com os ditos mercadores 
mouros fezlhe homrra deulhe lugares pa seus apousemtamemtos 
lugar pa suas mezqhas & os ditos mouros como ouuerom o dito lugar 
fezerom fermosas casas a vsamca da trra & pouoaca / gramdememte 
come^auase a fazer trato pincipallmemte por causa dos ditos mouros 
serem Riquos do quail Recebia o xaquem darxa Rey de malaca 
gramde proueito E comtemtamemto & deulhes a elles Jurdi^ao sobre 
sy E os mouros eram mujto validos acerq a do dito Rey E acabauom 
qmto queriam//. 

Em este meio tempo acudirom aquelles mercadores que estauam 
em pa?ee he mais mercadores mouros & tratauam em malaq a E de 
malaq a em pacee he hiam aumemtamdo a terra de malaq a & ysto 
nom se semtia em pa$ee por causa do gramde numero de gemte que 
avija no dito lugar como se dira em seu lugar & vinham dout a s 
partes de comotora gemte a trabalhar & ganhar sua vida & de symga- 
pura & das Jlhas comarcaas de celates & outra gemte E o dito Rey 
xaquendarxa p° ser homem de Justi?a & combenjuollo aos merca- 
Fol. x6yv. dores folgauam com elle De maneir a | q neste meio tempo vierom 
dous Juncos da chijna que hiam a pae?e E o dito Rey fez Represa 
em alguua Jemte por tall que quisesem alij tratar he vemderom 
alguua mercadoria aos ditos mercadores E muyta outra leuarom a 
pa$ee//. 

Ja neste tempo ero ho Rey xaquemdarxa velho E a terra trataua 
mercadoria & avija mujtos mouros E mujtos moulanas que traba- 
lhaua por fazer ho dito Rey mouro & asy o desejaua gramdememte 
ho Rey de pa ?ee/ por casso veio o dito xaquendarxa a qrer semtar os 
ditos ca?izes E folguar com elles avida esta noti?ia ho dito Rey de 
pa?ee avisado polios cacizes q la tinha mamdado secretamemte 
mamdaua outs 0 mais autorizados a embutillo E desviallo de seu 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 475 

nacimemto & Jemtelidade & conVrtello E ysto por Jmdustria & nom 
pruujcamemte/ /. 

Amolefiquado o Rey xaquemdarxa oil por vija dos cacizes ou por 
quail qr out a man ra se comtratou com ho dito Rey de pagee que 
tratarom casamemtos huuas f a s do dito Rey de paege com ho dito 
xaquemdarxa com tall comdicam q se tornase mouro como elle era 
E que sempre seriam e huua damdolhe a emtemder pllos ditos 
moulanas qmta onrra lhe vinha do tall ajuntam t0 & afynjdade do 
grande Rey de pagee elle se tomar mouro avemdo amtre elles gramdes 
Recados he trabalhamdo os mouros no dito casamemto //. 

Fynall memte que o dito Rey xaquemdarxa semdo de Jdade de 
setemta & dous annos se tornou mouro E todollos de sua casa E 
casou com ha filha do dito Rey de pagee E nom somemte elle se 
tornou mouro mas ajmda fez pertempo toda sua Jemte & desta 
maneira se fez o dito Rey mouro E dalij por diamte forom atee a 
tomada De malaca E viueo casado oito annds gerqado de moulanas 
E ficoulhe huu f° Ja homem que se tambem tornou mouro filho de 
sua primeira molher que herdou o Regno E se chamaua moda- 
farxa •//. 

Este Rey xaquemdarxa semdo de ydade de quoremta E cinq 0 
annos qujs hir achina em pesoa a ver o Rey da china E deixou o 
Regno em poder dos mamdaris dizemdo que queria hir veer o Rey 
que tinha a Jaoaa E Siam a sua obidiemgia & pagee como largamemte 
se tratara na descrigam da china E foy homde o Rey estaua & falou 
com elle E fezse seu vasallo trebutario E tornou em synall de vasa- 
lagem o sello da chyna E o meo de malaq a como todos tern foilhe la 
feita mujta homrra E despachado com dadivas E festejado gramde- 
memte he tornou ha malaq a E pos no camjnho yda & estada & vimda 
tres annbs //. 

E veio em companhia ho dito xaquemdarxa de hum capitam gramde 
que o trazija por mamdado do dito Rey da china o quail capitam 
trazija huua f a fremosa chijna E vimdo asy o dito xaquemdarxa em 
malaq a por fazer homrra ao dito capitam casou com ella posto que 
nom fose molher de linhagem & nom se espamtam os Jemtios serem 
casados com mouras porque he costume q a he mais folgam os mouros 



476 TOME PIRES 

de casar as molheres com Jemtios que elles com gemtias porque 
fazem os maridos mouros/ este he o costume destas terras a este 
xaqemdarxa deu o Rey da china poder que podese leuar moeda 
destanho a malaq a q he como ^eitis // 

Ho dito Rey xaquemdarxa ouue desta china huu filho que se 
chamou Rajapute domde decemdem os Reis de paao E campar E 
amdargerj como se dira despois o qll foy mujto bom homem E ouue 
fs° & fs a & despois foy morto as maaos De ellRey madafarsa seu 
sobrinho como se dira na vida do dito Rey/ : madafarx a 

Este Rey madafarxa ouue muj tas molheres fs a de Reis comar- 
quaoos este dizem ser melhor Rej que todos os damtes Refirmouse 
gramdememte com syam he com Ja5a & com os chijs E lequjos foy 
homem de mujta Justifa daua gramde aviam to ao nobrecimemto De 
malaq a comprou & fez Junqos & os man daua fora encompanhia de 
mercadores polio quail ajnda oje em dia os mercadores amtiguos 
Do tempo do dito Rey modafarx a ho gabam gramdememte & 
sobretudo de gram Justifjoso//. 

Fol. i68r. E este Rey modafarxa aquerio a malaq a terras .s. da bamda de 
queda ouue Mimjam q he huu luguar bom & tern huu Rijo nam 
mujto gramde na quail terra se faz estanho he trebutario a malaca 
como mais largamemte se dira qmdo se tratar dos lugares que a 
malaca pagauam pareas E asij tomou 9alamgor que qr Dizer estanho 
tambem bom luguar E tambem o fez trebutario asymesmo como ho 
outro & destes lugares trazem a malaqa alguus mamtimemtos que 
seram dez legoas De malaq a //. 

Tomou asy mesmo a pouoacam de cheguaa que he o Rijo fremoso 
alem de muar pa a bamda de sijngapura Rijo gramde omde podem 
emtrar mujtas naaos em o quail Rijo ha aRoz pouco/ cames pescados 
tern vinhos da terra he espa?osa Ribr a tern gemte de peleja dizem 
que de muar E de cheguaa saee gemte esforcada huu destes lugares 
he do bemdara E out° do lasamana a Jurdicam tem cada huu do 
ciujll E crime ou tynham em seu tempo//. 

E este madafarxa saia mujtas vezes a pelejar pesoallmemte E 
ficaua seu Jrmao Raja pute por paduca rraja que quer dizer visoRey 
pelejou este com ellRey daruu mujtas vezes E tomoulhe o rregno 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 477 

de Jrcam q esta de fromte de malaq a na terra de daruu/ e este emqmto 
viueo sempe lhe fez guerra segundo afirmam // 

Tomou este o canall de simgapura com a Jlha de bimtam & trouxe 
tudo a sua obydyemgia athee oje omde ora esta acolheito fugido E 
sobre o dito canall teue gerra com ellRey de pahaoo E de talimgano 
E de patane E sempre leuou a melhor he comtudo ficoulhe a terra & 
obidiemgia E cassou huua sua Jrmaa mais velha com ho dito Rey 
de pahamo que noua memte era feito mouro & avera ysto cimqoemta 
& cimquo ou sesemta annos/ Ao mais o qual se tornou mouro ha 
Requerimemto do dito moda farxa E que casaria a dita sua Jrmaa 
com elle//. 

Este fez guerra a campar E amdarguerj E pelejou mujto tempo com 
estes dous Reynos que sam na terra de menamcabo domde o ouro 
vem a malaqua he por tpo tamto os apresou o dito modafarxa por 
ser Riqo E nauegarem em seu porto na 5 oes e por Ja ser liado com os 
Jaaos he chijs & syames he em pae?e q por sua propia Jmdustria 
casou duas fs a de Raja pute seu Jrmaao huua com o Rey de campar 
E outra com ellRey damdarguerj E tornaronse mouros os ditos Rex 
& a Jemte a elles mais Domestiq a porque toda a out a ajmda perma- 
nefe ensua gentilydade E asij forom feitos mouros avera cinquoemta 
annos ao mais//: 

E por esta homrra que ganhou em fazer asy estes tres Reis mouros 
trebutarios soar tamto seu nome que teue rrecados & presemtes dos 
Reis dadem & dormuz & de cambaya de bemgala & mamdarom 
mujtos mercadores de suas partes a morar ha malaq a E chamouse/ 
?oltan que nesta terra quallquer s5r se chama rraja som te pacee 
E malaqua bemgalla se chamam soltanes E nisto tenha gramde tento 
que quamdo de purtugall viese carta pa qaall quer Rey de qua/ que 
diga do ?oltan de portugall pa tij Raja/ foam/ 

Trabalhou este mujto com seu poder pa vr se destruiria daruu 
posto q daruu pm ro foy mouro o rrey que nenhuu Destes nem que o 
de pacee segumdo afirmam mas porque dizem que nom he bem 
creemte em mafomede & viue no sertao tern mujta Jemte E tern 
mujta fustalha amdam sempre a furtar e em quail qr lugar q saltam 
euam tudo & disto viuem & Ja ysto nunca se pode emmemdar 



tom£ pires 


478 

porque a trfa de daruu he desta maneira E de daruu atrauesam a 
terra de malaq a em huu Dia & os daruu sam homes mujto temjdos 
E desde modafarxa athee o tempo da tomada de malaq a polio 
gouernador das Jmdias sempre forom Jmiguos he oje em dia ho 
sam//. 

Este modafarxa mamdou a Ja5a embaixadores ao Rey Jemtljo 
E dizem q por Jmdustria secreta teue maneira como por seus 
Fol. i68v. cacizes comuerteo gramdes homes | das beiras do maar a fazerse 
mouros estes que ora sam pates disto se tratara na descricam De 
Ja5a/ era vasallo o dito modafarxa do dito Rey de Jaaoa E lhe 
mamdaua alifamtes E cousas da china E rroupas Ricas das que a seu 
porto vinham e emqmto viueo sempre com o dito Rey teue sua 
amizade & de Ja5a acudia gramde copia de mantim tos Enobrecia 
mujto o porto De malaq a //. 

Em este meio tempo morreo a molher dellRey de pahao & o dito 
modafarxa casou co elle huua sua sobrinha filha de rraja pute seu 
Jrmaao E ficaua liado o dito rraja pute com pahao & campar 
andargerj E o povoo De malaqua cria Ja mujto em Rajapute que era 
mais velho que modafarxa segumdo dizem & por ser f° de maceba 
easy molher nom erdou outs 0 dizem q era mais mancebo da mofa 
china na?ido como quer que seja tinha gramde autoridade era bom 
homem muj t0 sesudo acataua gramdememte ao Rey seu Jrmaao 
moraua no lugar bretao De que Ja falamos E tambem laa morauam 
os Reis mas acudiam algus Dias a ?idade omde tinham seu asemto 
sobre o momte como Ja disemos p° q em huua ora com a maree 
decern de bretao em malaq a //: 

Neste tempo malaq a tinha gramde copia de mercadores de mujtas 
nacoees he comecava Ja pa?ee de nom ser asy gramde como o era E 
os mercadores & tratamtes no maar conheciam qmta diferem^a avia 
do naveguar a malaq a que com todos temporaes eram seguros 
amcorados & que dos outs 0 podiam tomar quamdo coujese (?) 
comecauam de todo vijr a malaq a pois achauam Retornos o rrey de 
malaq a aviase com elles mamsamemte & temperado que he cousa 
que mujto cria os mercadores mormemte na nacam estramgeira 
folgaua destar na gidade mujtas mais vezs q Damdar a ca?a por 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


479 

ouijr & detremjnar agrauos tiranjas q malaq a cria p° Rezam de seu 
gramde sitio & trato // 

Este modafarxa ouue huu filho de sua molher que ouue nome 
mansursa este amdaua em guarda do tio Raja pute era emsynado E 
guardado polio rrajapute sempre como seu ayo he eram Dados 
ambos a prazer E o pay trabalhaua nas cousas que lhe compriam asy 
que neste meio tempo veio o dito modafarxa a estar doemte em cama 
E o filho mamsursa veo a estar com o dito seu pay na cidade obidi- 
ciam ao 00090 mamsursa//. no bretam tinha Raja pute autoridade 
faziam o que lhe elle mamdaua o madafarxa agastauase de sua 
doem9a he tambem por nom saber por sua morte que mudam^a faria 
o Regno em que tamto trabalho tinha leuado Rogaua a Raja pute e 
emcomemdaualho que asosegada memte ho emtreguase a mamsursa 
o rraja pute dise que asy farja o 01090 era Ja de vimte annos segumdo 
dizem ou pouquo menos fale9eo ho pay madafarxa comecou ho 
mo90 de fazer seu ofi9io a morte do pay E seu emterramemto 
homrradamemte como era Rezam E tambem por comselho do 
Raja pute//. 

Depois de feito o emteramemto Recolheose o Raja pute ao bretao 
E mamsursa comecou sesudamemte a Reger seu Regno tomamdo 
comselho dos amtiguos segumdo hordena9a Vrtuosa a9erqua Da 
Justi9a e comserva9am da terra ajuntou gemte// neste tenp 0 parece 
q veio a noticia Do mo9o que Raja pute seu tijo ou por ser velho ou 
por ser tarn liado na terra & fora que o desacataua em o nom vijr Vr 
como a Rey que era saltou huu dia la homde estaua o dito Rajapute 
E achouo em huu balecy que sam como Ramadas Rica memte 
obradas com mamdaris & p as homrradas q com elle estauam // 

Vimdo o dito mamsursa aleuamtaromse todos E semtouse E ou 
rraja pute Jumto o quail costume nom he qua que o f° nom se asemta 
junto com ho pay posto q seja herdeiro salluo se o filho for casado fey 
como se dira nos costumes dos malaijos em seu lugar Dise o 111090 
Raja pute ha tamtos dias q te nom vij estaas doemte/ dise q mall 
semtido fora Dise o mo90 pois mall semtido amdas rex meteo o cris 
nelle tres ou quatro vezes E ficou alj morto lloguo ho Rajapute E 
por esta causa temeo gramdememte sempre a gemte o dito Rey 



480 TOM £ PIRES 

mansursa E foy mujto temjdo E acatado ajudado qmdo queria seus 
naturaes //: 

Fol. i6gr. Come£ou ho Rey mamsursa a leuar ho camjnho do pay asy em 
Reger o pouo anjmar sua Jemte a guerra gramdememte era pacifiquo 
aos mercadores E omem benjuollo este trouxe a obidiem£ia de 
malaq a / calangor / vernam/ mijam/ pirac/ que sam lugares destanho 
he perti^e ao Regno de quedaa & sobre yso teue guerra com queeda 
semdo terra do Regno de syam E a terra ser toda do Regno de syam 
veio e escolha destes lugares com que queria estar em obidienupia 
diserom que com ellRey mamsursa Rey de malaq a & ficarom athe 
a tomada de malaca sempre nesta obidiemgia paguamdo pareas como 
se despois dira largamete// 

Ho dito Rey mamsursa por seus capitaees na terra de darn tomou 
por forga a villa de rrupat q he defromte de malaca E o Regno de 
ciac/ fez seu vasallo o xeque de porim tudo ysto na Jlha de camotora 
os quaees vierom presos a malaq a e em seu tempo os tornou a suas 
terras he sempre estiuerom em sua obidiemcia atee o dia que foy 
tomada polio gram capitam das Jndias & 

Em tempo Deste mamsursa Reuelarom comtra elle ellRey de 
paham & de campar & de amdarguerij pola morte de rraja pute seu 
sogro que elle matara/ & asy p sua p a como p seus capitaees os tomou 
E vemgeo E dobrou as pareas E os fez debaixo de seu trebuto E com 
elles fez paz & casamentos E casou o dito mamsursa com huua f a 
do Rey de paao E o rrey de pahao com hua sua Jrmaa De mamsursa 
E casou out a sua Jrmaa com ellRey de menancabo semdo gemtio he 
o tornou mouro out°s afirmam Jmda oje o dito rey no ser mouro 
Vrdade he ser mouro c5 obra de cem omees toda a out a Jemte he 
Jemtia //. 

teue por mam£eba este mamsursa huua filha de Rajapute seu tijo 
& por molher teue a f a do seu lasamane foy este manssursa cavaleiro 
E gramde luxurioso Justicoso vasallo sempre verdadeiro dos Rex 
dos chijs E do rrey De Jaoa & de syam he de como esta vasalajem 
era se dira ao diamt e//. 

os mouros de malaq a dizem q foy o melhor Rey mamsursa que 
todos seus antecesors este larguou liberdades aos estramgeiros merca- 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


481 

dores teue sempre gramde feruor de Justi^a Dizem que em pessoa 
corria a ?idade D noyte Dizem q dormja pouquo Jugaua muj to aos 
dados era gramde gugador de tauollas a nosa guisa q hos chijs Jogam 
em sua terra este mamsursa fazija os homees de nada hera seu veador 
da fazemda huu qujlim gemtio que dizem q valia tamto com elle 
que nom fazija mais do que elle queria E p esta maneira huu cafre 
de palimbao q era seu espauo valeo tamto que diziam que o conuer - 
tiam a gemtilidade pmeira fynall memte vierom emtamto creci- 
memto estes homees ambos .s. o qujlim & o palimbao que se tor- 
narom mouros em tempo de mansursa E o bemdara q aq 1 degolaro 
que foy na treicam De dioguo lopez de seq ra era seu neto e era Ja 
mo 5 r q ho Rey em poder E o neto do palimbaoo he o laseman a que 
oje amda com ho Rey q foy de malaq a E tamto creciam estes dous 
homees em tempo deste Rey mansursa q vierom a tarn gramdes 
dijnjdades/ Como se despois decrara q cousa he bendara & que 
cousa he lasemana//. 

Este Rey mansursa era casado com huua filha dellRey de pahao 
sobrinha dellRey de syam & disto secopaua tamto o dito Rey que 
avia seus f°s por mayores q todos seus amte9esores era homem man- 
sursa mamso liberall tafull luxurioso E com ysto fazija Justifa 
todallas f a s de mercadores parses fremosas & de quelijs que bem 
pare9esem tinha por mam9ebas tornavas mouras quamdo as avya de 
casar E casauas com f°s De mamderijs & lhes daua casamemtos o 
quail costume nom se estranha em malaq a casarem leis comtra leis//. 

Este Rey mansursa fez a fremosa mjzqta que estaua homde oje he 
a famosa fortaleza de malaca a quail era a melhor que avia nestas 
partes sabida. & mamdou fazer pomtes no Rijo Riq a memte obradas 
este fez os dereitos das mercadarias mais baixos como se dira em seu 
luguar polio quail foy tarn estimado dos naturaes he estramgeiros 
que alcan90u gramde Riqueza & fez gramde tesouro dizem q he 
omem de cemto & vijmte qintaees douro & de gramde pedraria E q 
detremjnava de hir a mequa com gramde copia douro em huu Junq 0 
que Ja tinha mamdado fazer em Jaaoa E out 0 em peguu de gramde 
gramdura E que se o nom atalhara ha | Doem9a que la ouuera de Fol. i 6 gv. 
hir tinha Jaa gramde gasto feito E muj ta Jemte pa a via Jem teue este 

R H.C.S. II. 



482 TOME PIRES 

mamsursa firme obediemcia sempre aos Jaaos chijs & syames E 
sempre os visitaua com alyfamtes porque os matos de malaqa cnam 
mujtos & aviaos em gramde maneira & segumdo ha terra asy lhe 
mamdaua as cousas de seus gostos mas nom lhe mamdau 3, dr° como 
se dira qmdo se decrarar em q forma he esta obidiemgia que a estes 
tres Regnos tinha & 

Este Rey mamsursa teue dous filhos & duas fs a o f° mais velho 
se chamou/ alaoadin/ que socedeo & out ro filho morreo amdamdo a 
momte as f a s casou huua com ellRey de campar E a outra com ellRey 
de pahamo Ja velho adoegeo esteue mujto tempo doemte & Regia 
ho Regno ell Rey alaoadim seu filho & Regemdo casou este Rey com 
huua f a de huu madarij primcipall a prazimemto do pay E morreo 
ellRey mansursa foy emterrado na sepultura dos Reis segumdo 
costume sobre o momte omde ora esta a forq a por despeito De sua 
vaidade E omrra q no tall lugar tiuero//: 

Este Rey alaoadin do primcipio de seu Regnar casou com huua 
filha del Rey de campar q era sua prima comjrmaa este aquerjo a 
malaca gramde numero dilhas de celates q sam cosairos a sua arte 
em paraos pequenos este por seus capitaes tomou as Jlhas de limgua 
que estam aqem de bamca easy defromte de palimbao domde sam 
os caual ros cabaees que nom podem morrer a ferro como se dira na 
sua descrica das Jlhas de limgua he fez o Rey dellas vasallo ao dito Rey 
alaoadin como he Jmda aguora fogido porem no se vee huu ao out ro 
porque ambos tem Regeo huu do out 0 & out° do out ro //. 

este teue pemdemga com os daruus E foy no maar desbaratado 
delles este dizem q era mais dado aas cousas da mjzquita que a out a s 
e era homem que comja mujto afiam que he opio E alguuas vezes 
nom era em seu acordo era homem apartado e estaua pouquas vezes 
na pouoagam E acrecemtou este mais Riqueza em seu tempo & 
Jurou De hir a mequa a comprir a Romaria do pay e elle se prometeo 
la com cousas q aparelhaua pa iso este Rey aloadin trazija sempre 
comsiguo os Rex de paao & de campar & amdarguerj em malaq a 
como em corte E paremtes seus e elle emformauaaos nas cousas de 
mafomede porque dellas sabia. out°s dizem q estes Rex vier5 aos 
casamemtos que fez com ellRey de paao que lhe tomou huua sua f a 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 483 

por mdlher & tinha ambas que asij se custuma sejam Recebidas 
podem ter quoatr 0 & o f° Da primeira herda o Regno//. 

Como quer que os ditos Rex amdasem em malaq a Amdauam por- 
que todas as cousas & terras & comaracs em comparagam de malaqua 
nom eram nada por causa de malaca ser porto de cabo de mougoees 
omde vem gramdes copias De Junquos & naaos & todos paguam 
dereitos & os que nom pagam dam presentes que he easy como 
dereitos & por este caso polio Rey da terra meter em cada Jumquo 
que pa fora vay seu qujnham he cousa pa os Rex de malaq a alcam- 
carem gramdes copias de dr° E njsto nom ha duujda os Ditos Rex 
de malaq a sam Riquisymos & 

Temdo este Rey detremjnado de pasar em meq a estamdo no 
bretam quis vir a malaqa acabar De se perceber. he em sete ou oyto 
dias Morreo De feures ficaromlhe dous fs° & tres filhas o primeiro 
era Raja caleman E este era f° da molher f a De ellRey de paao E as 
filhas tres huua era da molher de paao E ouue Raja mafamut que 
perdeo malaca E este era da filha do mamdarjm E as fs a tres huua 
era Da molher De paao Ja dita. E as duas Da molher f a dellRey de 
campar por estes ficarem mocos tamto q morreo o dito Rey alaoadim 
Regia ho bemdara ho Regno athe os mocos vire a ser mayores alguus 
fauoreciam o Raja gale imam o bemdara fauorecia ho Raja mafamut 
que era seu neto f° de sua f a mas ho Regno nom pertegia somemte 
ao Raja galeman por ser f° de Rainha porq as out a s sam De menos 
valia. posto que sejam Recebidas pa o herdar dos f°s 

Neste tempo pasarom quoatro ou cimq 0 annos E os gramdes 
mamdaris comecarom a fazer pargealidades E bamdos paao traba- 
lhaua por sua pte pa seu neto herdar o Regno o bemdara era poderoso 
na terra E podera aVr o Regno pa sy mesmo se o nom quisera pa 
o neto tinha o gerto pa o Raja mafamut seu neto he pa isto | tinha Fol. 17 or. 
gramde valia E paremtesquo pa o fazer como dito hee posto q em 
cima diga que este Rey mafamut era neto do bemdara que degolarom 
nom era senom neto De seu Jrmaao filho De huua sua f a E esta he a 
verdade que despois o tirei a linpo //. 

Aleuamtarom o dito Rey mafamut por Rey de malaq a E no prin- 
gipio de seu Regnado p° fazer paz com pahaao casou com huua f a 



TOM £ PIRES 


484 

dellRey De paao E foy este Rey de menor Justica que nenhuu Dos 
pasados gramde luxurioso cada dia bebodo Damfiam era presum- 
tuoso por forga trazija os Rex de pahaao & de campar E ardagirij 
em malaq a era tam Reuerem9eado que lhe nom falauam senom de 
mujto lomge E mujto pouqas vezes era gramde comedor E bebedor 
criado em boa vida E viciosa era temjdo os out°s Rex quamdo lhe 
falauam era com gramdes ^umbayas cortesyas a sua gisa chamauase 
coltam mafamut //. 

Este por sua soberba leuamtou loguo a obidiemyia a ellRey de 
syam he nom qujs mais mamdar embaxador a sua terra nem menos 
a Jaoa somemte fiquou na obidiemcia Da china Dizemdo como avia 
malaq a de ser obidiemte aos Reis obidiemtes a china polio quaall 
avera qinze annos que ellRey de syam moueo gerra comt a malaq a 
os seus capitaees polio mar E saio o lasemana DellRey de malaq a 
E os desbaratou a Jlha De pulo pi9am homde emcomtraro hos 
syames De maneira que des o dito tempo nunq a mais teue paz com 
syam & avera vimte & dous annos aguora que sam quebrados & nunca 
mais vierom a malaq a syames senom aguora em tempo que malaqa he 
nosa-//: 

Ho Rey de Jaaoa nom curou De malaq a nem de sua obidiem9ia 
porque nom lhe Relevaua por quamto os portos Do maar sam Ja 
tornados De mouros tern o sertaoo he nom pode fazer guerra a 
malaq a porque nom tern poder no maar como largamemte se Recom- 
tara qmdo se falar na nobre Jlha Da Jaaoa E de suas cousas he gemte 
he comdi9oees E de como os mouros sam Ja em pose das beiras do 
mar fez alardo o dito Rey mafamut em malaq a quamdo pelejou com 
os capitaees de ellRey de siam E acharomse nouemta mjll homees pa 
poder tomar armas disto foy tam soberbo E desaRazoado E tam 
presumtuoso q Dizia q elle soo abastaria pa destroir ho mundo E 
que o mundo tinha necesydade de seu porto por ser cabo De mou- 
9oees e que em malaq a avija De fazer meq a & que nom avija De ter 
opinjam De seus amtepasados De hir a mequa & por esta causa 
dyzem os mouros letrados E os pouos que pola soberba deste pecado 
se perdeo he querem lhe todos mall//. 

Este Rey mafamut ouue medo de se leuamtar Raja caleman com 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


4 8 5 

ho Regno he mamdouo matar em malaqua E trazija comsiguo em 
malaca Raja Jalim pay deste moco que era Rey de campar aguora & 
se chamaua Raja andela/ Dizem todos q este rraja Jalim era mujto 
bom homem E porque o vijo de suas casas pasear por huua rrua bem 
acompanhado Dixe Ja aqujllo he pa me tirar o Regno que dira que 
lhe ptemce soube ysto o Raja Jalim E fezse Jrmjtaao como homes 
que desprezam ho mumdo E comtudo ho mamdou matar com peco- 
nha sabida memte semdo seu primo com Jrmaao E matou Raja bunco 
seu sobrinho as crisadas por que se queria hir a daruu Dizem q era 
este de mais pre?o q Raja Jalim// 

Matou Jso mesmo a Jrmaa de Raja Jalim que era sua molher may 
dellRey amet seu f° aas crisadas sem causa somemte por lhe vijr asy 
a vomtade quamdo esta a bebodo com o afiam he omem este mujto 
mudauell De crudelisymo diabolico/ no tenp 0 deste despois destas 
cousas serem pasadas E ter morto outs 0 homees mujtos cheguou 
Dioguo lopez de seq ra nos Naujos/ matou tuam porpate mujto 
grade mamdarim & seu filho tuam a^em que eram como o rraja 
bumco e estes aas crisadas // 

Cheguado dioguo lopez de seq ra devamte o porto de malaq a 
neste tempo avya em malaca. segumdo Vrdadeiramemte se afirma 
mjll guzarates mercadors | Amtre os quaes avia gramde copia Delles Fol. iyov. 
De gramde cabedall Riquos & out°s era estamtes por out°s E desta 
maneira dizem que avja aq de parses & bemgallas he arabios mais 
de quoatro mjll homees amtre os qees emtrauam mercadores Riq°s 
& out°s feitores Doutros//. 

Auja asy mesmo qujlis mercadores gramdes & de gramde trato & 
de mujtos Junquos esta he a nacam que mais nobrege malaq a tem 
estes a masa nas maaos como ao Diante se dira / primeira memte os 
guzarates se forom ao dito Rey mafamut com gramde presemte E 
asij parses & arabios E bemgallas E mujtos dos qujlis Jumtamemte 
fezerom sua fala ao dito Rey como os portugueses eram chegados ao 
porto & pois asy era que Ja aviam De vijr alij cada vez E que alem 
de Roubarem ho maar E a terra espiauam pa aver de tornar a tomala 
como Ja toda a Jmdia era em poder dos portugueses a que q a 
chamam framges que por qmto portugall era lomge que os Deviam 



TOME PIRES 


486 

aquj De matar todos E que a noua nom poderia ser tam 5edo em 
purtugall ou nunq a E que malaq a non se pderia ne seus mercadores 
emearecemdolhe o caso de maneira que o Rey Respomdeo q elle 
falaria com ho bemdara & elle Detrimjnaria o que lhe njsso parefese 
os da fala foro ao bemdara leuaronlhe o presemte dobrado E a mor 
parte era dos guzarates conuerterom ho bemdara a sua comjurafa 
E mais lhe diserom ao dito bemdara que pedise ao Rey a naao 
capitayna pa sy que trazia mujtas bombardas//. 

leuarom hos sobreditos mercadores presemte ao lasamane que 
nisto os ajudase E assij o fezerom ao tomungo que era Jrmaao Do 
bemdara & falarom ao f° de vtemuta Raja Jaao que aquj degolarom 
que fose niso & que pedise huua naao daquellas Estauam asy todos 
emformados & abalados athee Vr q era a vomtade DellRey neste 
meio tempo lamfou dioguo lopez mercadaria fora em gudoees pa 
fazer sua carga a quail cousa Dizem q deu crecimemto a treifam pa 
apanharem a mercadaria pa ellRey & bemdara//. 

chamou o dito Rey a comselho o bemdara & o lasemana E o 
tumungo cerina De rraja que Dizem que era o mais sesudo homem 
de malaca E chamou tua. mafamut q despois morreo as nosas maaos 
que era pesoa primcipaall E outs 0 Ja hordenados do comselho & 
propos ho dito Rey a fala a todos o q se deuja fazer sobre o que 
diziam as Jerafooes dos mercadores sobre a vimda Do tall capitao / 
Diserom o bemdara E o tuam mafamut & os out°s mamdaris ao dito 
Rey que era bem que os matasem a tSdos & que log 0 era feito q elle 
cataria maneira pa iso preguntou o Rey ao lasemana E ao tomunguo 
q lhe pare^ia, Dixerom ambos q nom era em tall comselho mas que 
fosem bem despachados & comtemtes E com sua mercaDoria pois 
vinham a salua fee a seu porto & se taees homees & tam maos eram 
como diziam que lhe disesem que se fosem embora & q nom es- 
tiuesem no porto//. 

Dixe o Rey vos out°s nom emtemdees o caso destes homees elles 
vem espiar a trra pa virem com armada Despois como sey & vos 
sabes q amdam tomamdo ho mundo & destroimdo E apagamdo o 
nome de noso samto profeta morram todos & despois se q a vierem 
out a alguua Jemte sera a que nos destroyremos no maar & na terra 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


487 

gemte Juncos ouro he em noso poder mais q em outro/ purtugall he 
lomge matemse todos// chamara os mercadores & diselhes ellRey 
que Ja o bemdara tinha a Reposta que falasem com ell e//: 

Dizem que dise ellRey ao lasemana & ao bemdara vos lasemana 
dares no mar com uosas lamcharas E matayos todos & nom se metam 
as naoos dos portugueses no fumdo E aRecadem a artelharia pa mjm 
E a naao capitayna E o bemdara Dara em terra nos q estiuerem ao 
peso por que os faremos todos sair E no maar temde bom Recado 
posto que vos soo abastaries pa Dez tamtas naaos quern destroyo os 
syames no maar larguo homde avija | Cemto pa huu dos nosos que p 0 i I y Ir 
fara a cousa tarn pouq a sobre amcora que os q vam ha vemderlhe 
galinhas abastaram pa elles que nom som homees de peleja segumdo 
sam emformado //: 

Dixe o lasemana este neguo<?io he comtra Justi^a E eu nom queria 
ser nelle he vos dig 0 que amte tomaria pemdenupa com mjll tamtos 
homees que com estes nom porq hos tema mas porque mjnha alma 
nom he na semelhante detremjna^am atrauesouse o f° do bemdara 
& dixe sor eu Jrey se lasemana nom qser Dise ellRey que lho agra- 
de^ia Respomdeo lasemana yde q se uoso neguo^io vay adiamte eu 
Nom sey nada E todos qmtos ha em malaq a nom som poderosos pa 
tomare estas naaos nem ha causa nom ho comsemte// 

Fiquou o Rey escamdaloso desta fala comtra o lasemana E 
quisera o mandar matar por lhe fazer de huu caso tarn pequeno 
tamanho E mamdou q nom saise de sua casa foy o bemdara & o f° 
seu mayor E o filho De vtamutarraja E o capitam dos guzarates 
Juntos nisto / dizem que cada huu qeria huua naao E que se desavi- 
nham sobr o escolher dellas E por no se emganare como mujtas vezes 
fazem tiuerom man a De averem a Jemte em terra que aviam de 
Recebr crauo em diuersas ptes de?eo a gemte em terra foy feito q 
todos sabem & no maar o q noso sor estoruou //. 

Despois da partida do dito Dioguo lopez do porto tornaram armar 
pa Vr se o poDiam acolher finallmemte fiquou o rey mujto descom- 
temte he mamdou chamar o lasemana E diselhe que lhe pare9ia 
as cousas pasadas & o lasemana lhe dise q maall E que curase De se 
fazer forte que os portugueses vimriam sobre malaca E que emtam 



TOME PIRES 


488 

saberia quem a defemdia dos homes franques sem medo E que 
tinham ho mumdo sojugado polio quail ho bemdara fiquou daly 
maall com ho Rey E mujto & por esta causa ho matou como se adiate 
dira & tudo he Justica de ds//. 

Ho Rey mafamut comecouse a fazer forte por comselho do lasa- 
mana he alguu tamto nom fazija gasalhado como soya ao bemdara./ 
cerima rraja-/. que era easy tamanho em poder como o dito Rey & 
dizem q se comecou apoderar da terra secreta memte out°s dizem 
que nam mas despois DellRey o bemdara. he o segundo como ao 
diamte se dira Despois disto asy este bemdara fanou fertos homees 
nosos p forfa com as maaos atadas E huu morreo sobre o caso E 
outrs° escaparom com peitas paguas por njna chatu bemdara 
secretamemte// 

Comecou o Rey a fazerse forte ouue coceguas do bemdara aleuan- 
tarse com ho Reino porque o Rey nom era conhecido em comparacam 
do bemdara/ & as crisadas matou ho bemdara/ cerima Raja / tuam 
a?em/ & tuam zeynar seus fs°/ & tuam zedij amet E tuam Racan 
seus netos que eram estes mores q Reys de pahaao E campar/ matou 
cirjma rraja Jrmaao do bemdara. E tuam adut alill & tua aly E 
tuam amet filhos do dito cirjma de rraja tumungo q todos era seus 
paremtes Das quaees cruezas fiquou o dito Rey mall quisto E 
avorecido de todds posto q esta casta o mere9ese polo comselho q 
cont a dioguo lopez de seq ra ordenarom//. 

A todos estes que matou tomou as molheres & fs° pa sy sobre 
todos tomou a f a do beDara que matou por molher de que ouue huu 
f° tomou as fazemdas de todos estes pa sy De que ouue gramde copia 
douro dizem q meteria e sua casa Desta feita cemto & vinte molheres 
fremosas E cimqoemta qintaes douro E outs a peijas E gramdes 
Joy as E dizem q hos mortos nom forom merecedores De tall morte 
porq nunqa se soube tall trei9am//: 

Duramdo este tempo E afortalezamdose o dito Rey de fortes 
traqueiras & de mujta artelharia polio medo E temor que tinham do 
que fezerom a nosos portugueses qujs fazer alardo de sua Jemte em 
Fol. 171V. todo seu Regno & senhorio com seus mamdaris E oficiaees seus | com 
seus capitaees E porque amte que a isto venhamos sera necesario 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


Recomtar da cidade de malaqa E seu termo E de seu Regno & despois 

dos lugares De seu S ri0 por mostrar sua gramdeza segumdo a terra 

de qua pa despois se saber sua destrujcam//: 

Malaqua da bamda dup e q he comtra qedaa tem por termo acoala I termo da 

penajy que he huu Rio q vem ao maar avera da fortaleza de malaca a ^ah^] 

esta foz quoatro leguoas he da bamda diler comtra muar tem por 

termos acoala ca?am & averra da fortaleza a este termo tres leguSas e 

emtam vimdo pola terra firme de huu termo a outro pello pee Do 

momte q se chama golom leidam que he termo da terra firme se 

9erra & acaba ho Dito termo de malaq a em o qll termo ha gramde 

numero De madeira pola mor pte Dereita que se vay ao ?eeo pa 

mastos & outs a obras & tem gostosas auguas //. 

Tem o dito termo de malaq a segumdo Ja he dito por seus lfmjtes Hqujm- 

mjll he cemto he cimqenta qujmtaas a que chamam du9oees dellas de 

palmeiras dellas Dorraquas Dellas de frujtas de diuersas maneiras termo de 

& bobas amtre as quaees tem afruita dos duryoes q he a melhor fruita ™ a l a Q u <*l 

q ha no mundo // sem duujda tinha malaca desde acoalapenajy atee o jemte 

Rijo De muar ao lomguo Do maar huu cate domees Darmas q Darmas 

podiam pelejar que sam cem mjll homees // estes tinha ao tempo do 

capitam mor vijr ha malaqua quamdo a tomou// tem este termo de 

malaq a alifamtes brauos mujtos E mujtos tigris cervos seis ou sete 

Jera90oees asy como bois & nam o sam//: 

Ho primeiro luguar hee cinyojum tem a guouernamca delle huu II Regno 

mamdary Este pagaua ao rrey que foy De malaqua quoatro mjll d ^ e ^ aCa 

calaijs cada huu anno postos em malaca sera lugar por huu rrio acoala 

acima De duzemtos viz 08 Sam malayos // penajy 

Outro luguar Das timas clam alem deste se chama /clam/ pagua qedaa/ /. 

outro tamto em malaqua E asy da pouoacam Do outro sam malayos tud °y st0 

sam terras 

como os de 9ima De cfnjojuu destanho 

Outro luguar ha alem deste em outro Rijo que se chama calamgor a Q ue 

, i i ~ i chamam 

paga em malaqua em cada huu anno sejs mjll calajs em tijmas este tijmasH. 

he moor luguar De mais gemte sam malaios//. cinjojum. 

Ho outro luguar he vernam este pagua em cada huu anno outro c i am 

tamto como clam E 9injoJuu E sera dous tamtos moradores como os 
. ,, I Vernam/ 

sobreditos // 



TOME PIRES 


I Alim- 
Jam I 


baruaz 


Fol. iy2r. 
pirac 


Regno de 
malaq a 
da bamda 
depaao 


IRijo 

fermosoj 


Singapura 


490 

Outro luguar se chama mjmjam este he de mais estanho que todos 
he mor q hos sobreditos pagaua em malaq a cadano oito mjll calajs 
q valem dezaseis mjll porque tem o dobro estes // este duas pouoa- 
9oees tem mjmjam he de malayos E a outra mais acima he de 
lufoees & mujtas vezes estam devisos & tem cada luguar sua Jurdi- 
9am E asy he oje em dia//: 

Outro he baruaz este nom tem tamto estanho mas tem mais gemte 
E he luguar De trato tem mujtos paraoos E gemte & no rrijo de 
baruaz ha duas pouoa95ees este baruaz tem mujto aRoz sam malayos 
pagam cadano sejs mjll tijmas em malaqua os deste lugar presumem 
mais soos q todos os outs 0 esta por capitam delle tuam a9em mamda- 
rim de malaq a & 

A outra pouoacam chamase pirac pagaua quoatro mjll tijmas em 
cada huu anno em malaca sera da pouoa9am como clam sam tambem 
malayos // 

Aos guouemadores destes lugares chamam mamdaliquas .s. mam- 
daliqua De tall luguar tem em suas terras ciuell E crime os piaees vem 
tratar sempre a malaq a em paraoos pequenos trazem timas E arroz 
galjnhas cabras figuos canas dacuqr oraquas E cousas semelhamtes a 
estas/ he Jemte proue ha destes lugares viuem desta man a & os da- 
ruus salteanos E as vezes leuam todos E sempe estam estes de tram- 
queiras & 

Ho primeiro luguar he muar esta he a primcipall cousa Depois de 
malaq a sera ha pouoacam de dous mjll homees tem huu Rijo mujto 
bom tem fremosas qntas he tem aRoz pa sy tem mamtimemtos ena- 
vomdam9a mujtas oracas a gemte de muar sam cavalleiros tem mujtos 
mamdaris he da Jurdi9am Do bemdara tem paraoos & fremosa 
Ribeira Darvoredos E pescados he fresca cousa//. 

Este Rio fremoso he modr Rijo que muar mujto nam tem tanta 
Jemte a lugares he pouoado pouq a cousa tem Demtro mujtas boquas 
podem emtrar nelle na5s tem fremosa madeira mujtas orraquas 
fruitas Jmfimdo pescado este lugar dyzem que he dos Reis De 
campar por comtratos amtigamemte// 

Alem he o canall De sijmgapura tem alguuas pouoa9oees De 9elates 
he pouq a cousa Dhy por diamte nom se estemde mais lomge o dito 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 491 

Regno pola terra este canall he eousa de pouca Jmportam^ia Diguo os 
moradores Delle//. 

Este Reyno De malaq a que atee aguora se dixe todo Jaz na terra de 
syam agora Diremos dos senhorios que obedegem a malaq a Delies 
acodem com parias Delies com Jemte comecase na Jlha De comotora 
pola costa camjnho de palimbaao //. 

Jrcado he tera Jumto com daruu soya ser sogeito a ellRey De Jrcaao 
daruu & aguora he De malaca he Regno & tern Rey este nom pagua 
parias somemte he obryguado na guerra D o ajudar com Jemte De 
gra?aa//. 

Rupat he luguar alem deste segujmdo ho direito camjnho he sor Rupat 
Delle huu mamdarj he obidiemte ao dito Rey De malaq a polla 
maneira q acima se dixe de Jrcao/ 

?iac he Regno tern Regno he pequena terra he obidiemte asy mesmo jfiacj 
ao Rey De malaca/ nestas terras viuem por suas lauoiras nam som 
homees De trato vem a malaca comprar pannos E de malaca os vam 
vemder trazem ouro em Retorno // 

Puijm he luguar casij de Relates he o xeq e delle obidiemte ao dito / Purjm / 
Rey de malaqua este luguar tern mais paraos E sam ladroees/ estes 
homees neste luguar vam fazer feira os ladroees dos furtos que fazem// 
daquj saem Remeiros pa malaqua ha neste lugar gramdisyma copia 
de sauees// mais q em azamor & dovas Delles vem a malaq a gramde 
camtidade 

Ho Regno de campar he forte/ a terra he deserta mujto & proue/ campar 
tem ouro tern lenho aloes De butica tern mujto breu mell $era tern 
arroz que abasta hos moradores este Rey de campar decemde de rraja 
pute sam primos com Jrmaos delRey de malaq a tem gramde liansa 
este pagaua ao dito Rey de malaq a amtigamemte quoatro cates douro 
q valem seis cemtos & vimte & cimquo cz dos todos quoat 0 //: 

Ho Regno de amdarguerj he como ho De campar he De mais Fol. 172V. 
mercadores tem mais ouro que campar tem asij paremtesquo com ho 
Dito Rey de malaqua como ho De campar & com o de campar // tem g Uer j 
em sua terra as mercadorias que ha em campar por que tudo he huua 
terra que se chama menamcabo posto que aja Rey de menamcabo 
esta terra se chama toda asy esta tem ouro melhor que aquij haa he 



TOME PIRES 


pahamo 


Tuquall 


jlimgual 


Q elates 


/ofifiaees 
do Rey de 
malaq a l 


492 

Rey mais chegado ao trato o damdarguerij porque tem melhor foz 
emtram Juncos Demtro pagua ao Dito Rey de malaqua out°s 
quoatro cates Douro por anno//: 

Pahaao he na terra de siam tem Jso mesmo gramde paremtesquo 
com ho rrey de malaq a he com hos Reis de campar he amdargerij este 
tem em sua terra as mercadarias q hos out°s tem he tem ouro em boa 
camtidade que se chama de pahamo he em poo & De menos valia q 
ho de menacabo he mor rrey ellRey de paao que cada huu destes e 
este tem ellRey de talimgano trebutario ha paao/ & paao he trebutario 
ao rregno De malaqa em out°s quoatro cates douro em cada huu 
anno este tem pedra vme he emxufre alem das out a s mercadorias tem 
b5a cidade peleja sempre com os de sijam tem pahSo mamdaris 
homees De peleja he terra q daa homees guerreiros tem trato De 
mercadorias tem mais mercadores em sua terra que amdarguerj he 
seu porto bom E sua gemte Domestifa a mercadaria //: 

A terra de tucall he alem damdarguerj na costa do maar he de xeq e 
he obidiemte a malaq a acode com Jemte he terra douro tem as merca- 
darias damdargerj he cousa pequena n5 he obidiemte a outrem senam 
a malaq a sam bobs homees no mar tem paraos pequenos/ 

limgua sam huuas quoatro Jlhas gramdes que estam defromte de 
tuncall easy no pm a terra de palimbao defromte/ tem Rej chamase 
Raja limgua este terra quoremta paraos E lamcharas he Jemte mais 
guerreira que toda out a De malaq a nem em seu Regno E senhorios 
Daquj saem os cabaees como se delles dira qmdo se falar e Jso este 
Raja limga he mujto qsto dos ?elatees //: 

celates sam cosairos ladroees amdam em paraos pequenos polio 
maar a Roubar homde podem sam obidiemtes a malaca fazem cabe$a 
de bimtam estes seruem de Remeiros qmdo sam rrequeridos Do rrey 
de malaca De graca somete polio mamtimento & o g dor De bimtam 
hos apresemta qmdo ham de serujr £ertos meses do anno’//: 

hos Rex de malaq a aas vezes fazem capitaees Jeraees a que chamam 
paduca Raja sam estes como visorreis este tall he despois Do Rey a 
taall p a fazem todollos mamdaris ^umbaia he bemdara E lasamana asy 
a fazem a este tall paduca Raja//. 

qmdo nom ha o sobrDito emtam he o bemdara ho moor do Regno 


Bemdara 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


493 

bemdara he como Just a moor/ em todo caso ciuell E crime tern asy 
mesmo carguo de toda fazemda do rrey de quaall quer sorte E comdi- 
cam que seja este mamda matar qual qr p a do pouo se he fidallguo ou 
estramgeiro faz primeiro emformacam ao Rey he ambos ho Detremj- 
nam com comselho Do lasamana E tununguo//: 

lasemana he como almjramte do maar he capitam de toda armada llasa- 
que se fizer no maar toda a Jemte Do maar E asij Juncos lamcharas mana l 
sam da Jurdigao deste he guarda do Rey todo caualeiro mamdarjm 
he da obidiemgia deste he easy tamanho como ho bemdara nas cousas 
de guerra he mujto moor E mais temjdo //: 

Tumunguo he alcaide moor da cidade tern carreguo da guarda tern tumungo 
mujta Jemte de sua Jurdigam a este vem todollos casos primgipiarse 
De prisSas & deste vam ao bemdara | E amda sempre este carguo em F°l- T 73r. 
pesoas de gramde estima este he tambem o que Recebe os dritos das 
mercadarias //: 

ha em malaq a quoatro xabamdares sam oficios da cidade sam xabam- 
homees que Recolhem os capitaees dos Juncos cada huu segumdo he dar * s 
dessua Jurdigam estes hos apresemtam ao bemdara catamlhe gudoees 
aviam suas mercadarias apousemtanos se trazem cartas dam hordem 
aos alifamtes / haa xabamdar dos guzarates mais primcipal que todos 
ha xabamdar da bunua qujlim bemgalla peguu pass ee/ ha xabamdar 
dos Jaos maluquo bamdam palimbaao tamjompura burney E dos 
lugoees ha xabamdar dos chljs lequeos chancheo champa/ cada huu 
acode a sua nagam quamdo vem a malaq a com mercadorias ou Re- 
quados//: 

Ho rregimemto de malaq a he que se o Rey tem filho mais velho de Como 
sua molher casa o de qinze annos ao diamte E se o tall f° ouue De sua so ( e ^ em 
molher f° ou filha que o Rey tem neto Disiste De sy a guouernamga E malaq a 
fiqua o filho no Regno & Ja o pay nom vsa de Rey dahij p° diamte 
com tudo hee acatado como Damtes mas nom Rege nada 

Nemguem nonpode vistir pano amarello senom elle sopena De -A orde- 
morte E se quer sair he poor outro pano emtam mamda apreguoar Q Rey tem 

a coor E nenguem nom saee de tall coor sopena De morte saira no acerq a de 

_ . T ^ j seu vistir 

anno tres quoatro vezes de praga que o vejam todos se vay por Esair j ora 

terra o alifamte vay cuberto atee os olhds De panno amarello & 



TOM ^ PIRES 


Yda do 
Rey por 
maar 


cabaaees 


Amoquos 


A Justica 
De 

malaq a 


Fol. 173V. 

I Ho que o 
Rey herda 
qmdo 
alguii 
morre de 
seu pouo\ 


494 

se traz Rey consiguo vay no pesco90 e elle vay no meio E o seu 
paje vay nas amcas sombreiro Da chijna nom o pode trazer senom 
sua p a //: 

Qmdo vay em parao ou lamchara leua quoatro uaras bramqas de 
compmemto de sete oyto bra5as Duas por popa E duas na proa 
chamamse guallas estas varas estas varas pode trazer huua De proa 
ho lasamana outro quail quer Rey pode trazer duas huua De popa E 
outra De proa & esta he a moor homrra q ha amtre elles a esta 
maneira nom se pode quebrar amtre os malaios E sobre cousas destas 
se mataram melhor que sobre out a s estas varas vam aleuamtadas 
asy brancas sem outra cousa//. 

Hos cabaees sam homees fidalguos tern dado a emtemder a todSs 
que nom podem morrer a ferro sam cabaees homees que trazem huu 
graao da^o E outs 0 metaees tamanho como graoos de comer/ no bucho 
Do bra?o drrto & qmdo este Recebem com Juramemto De morrer 
como cavalleiros ha poucos cabaees sam mujto temjdos ha terra 
Domde saem melhores cabaees sam das Jlhas de limgua E apos estes 
de bumee & de paao E os somenos sam De malaq a // 

Amocos sam caualeiros amtre estes/ homees que tomam Detremj- 
nacam de morer he va com ella adiamte E morrem esta tall Detremj- 
nacam se chama amoquos destes ha mujtos em malaq a E por estas 
partes todas/ nom se podem fazer sem mujto vinho pmeiro Destes se 
dira qmdo se falar Da JaaSa por que dela saem amoquos pncipaes 

Quamdo alguu mamdarim hade morrer por Just a vam a sua casa & 
dizem asde morrer E o mais cheguado paremte ho mata as crisadas 
ho morto se laua pmeiro E faz sua ora9am emtam Danlhe o ciij a que 
chama betelle E asy morre ou se esta presso esta he a mais homrrada 
morte: E se he piam leuano a Rua & mandano matar ou espetar ou 
asar ou as punhadas nos peitos segumdo a calidade Do cryme E a fa- 
zemda de todos estes he do Rey se nom tern herdeiro de linha dereita 
E se o tern leua a metade// : 

Qmdo alguua p a ou mercador morre sem herdeiro De drita linha 
leua ho Rey sua fazemda E se o morto fez herdeiro emtam partem a 
fazemda de promeyo fazem pmeiro as esmollas E osequjas Do momte 
moor & pagamse quaesquer Dividas q ho morto Devija //: 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


495 

Como sam pesoas homrradas nom casam sem o fazer sabr primeiro Maneira 

ao bemdara. se he antr mercadores tamto hade leuar o marido como a dos casa ~ 

memtos 

molher & ysto amtre os qujlijs q casam emmogos E seheamtremouros 
ho homem hade dar a sua molher Dez taees & sejs mazes Douro 
Darras estes ham sempre De ser viuos em poder Della & se o marido 
a quer Deixar ficamlhe as Ditas arras & os vestidos E pode cada huu 
casar com quern lhe bem vier E se a molher fez com ho marido viajem 
polio maar Emtamlhe emtregua o dr° ao marido E se se Dalij apartam 
em tall caso acode ho marido com hos dez taees & o ganho delles 

Se alguu homem faz adulterio se o marido pode matar ao adultero A maneira 
& sua molhr ambos Demtro em casa fica liure se mata huu & o out 0 E SO j r f os 
nam tern penna E se alguu fogio E o matou fora Jmdo De casa tern teriosl 
penna De morte som te o pode premder & dhy por diamte nom pode 
fazer vida com sua molher acusado o out 0 // 

qmdo alguu homem JnJuria out 0 ou molher a penna he a metade Maneira 
pa o Rey he a metade pa parte nom podem Requerer sua Justica j„j ur j a 
sem a pesoa Requerente leuar alguua cousa ao Juiz segumdo a 
calidade do q se demamda he disto sam mujto Riquos hos 
bemdaras// 

Todo mamdarij qmdo vay ver o Rey nom se chega a elle a dez A maneira 

pasadas he allevamta as maaos ambas em cima Da cabeca tres vezes e que te ™ os 
1 _ mamdartjs 

emtam beija a terra & falalhe o que qr por terceiras p aB E ao despedir qmdo 
outro tamto ysto os dias que sabem que o Rey se mostra a elles E com 
outro tamto fazem ao primgepe tern todos graDe acatamemto ao Rey 
E as suas cousas E o pouo qmdo pasa por Jumto com as casas Do Rey 
a ellas fazem Reueremgia//. 

Todo mamdarjm qmdo falla com out 0 nom se asemta em pee por Maneira 
Rezam dos asemtos saluo se o asemto he Tguoaall como bamquo ou dos _ 
casa De huu teeor E quamdo acenam a maao ezquerda apertada com 
o dedo polegar estemdido E a maao Drita sobre a ezquerda asy falam 
por cortesya. todo home tem suas casas mais baixas Do amdar pa os 
serujdores q nom estem tarn altos como hos senhores quamdo com 
elles falarem/ ao malayo nom lhe aleuantares a maao Do Jmbiguo pa 
cima he gramde cortesy Disto se dira nas cousas Da Jaoa porque della 
tomarom este custume//: 



TOME PIRES 


496 

A ma- Hos malaios sam homees fiosos E asy toda a J emte homrrada da 
netra de terra nom lhe aves De ver suas molheres nunca nem saem fora saluo 
Iheres & alguua ora se sam p as pa iso saem em amdores cubertos & muj ias 
molheres ysto alguua ora tern cada huu huua molher & duas De 
mamcebas qmtas querem viuem em paaz esta a terra nesta horde- 
namga gemtios casam com mouras & mouro com gemtia por suas 
cerimonjas e em seus prazeres & festas sam mujtas vezes tornados do 
vinho sam homees De momos & as molheres a guisa Da Jaaoa//: 
quejemte Mouros do Cairo/ De mequa/ Dadem/ abixijs/ De qujlloa/ De 
^tratauae me ^ mc W Durmuz/ parsios/ Rumes / turqos/ turqujmaes/ armenjos/ 
malaq a E xstaos/ guzarates/ De chaull/ Dabull/ De guoa / Do Regno De 
partidasll ^ ac l uem / malabares/ E quelijs/ mercadores dorixa/ De ceilam/ 
bemgalla/ | Derraquam/ peguus/ syames/ De quedaa/ malaios/ de 
Fol. i?4r. p a 5 0 j patane/ camboja / champar/ cauchy/ china/ Da china/ lequeos/ 
bumeis/ lu?oes/ tamjompura/ laue/ bamca/ limga/ tern mjll Jlhas 
outras/ maluqo/ bamdan/ bima/ timor/ mamdura/ Jaoa/ cumda/ 
palimba Jambj/ tuncall/ amdargueij/ capo / campar/ menamcabo/ 
9iac/ Rupat/ arqua/ daru bata terra Do tomjano/ pa9ee/ pedir/ Diva//: 
Afora gramde camtidade dilhas out a s Regioees De que vem muj tos 
espauos E arrozes no sam lugares De mujto trato E portamto se nom 
faz delles mem^am somemte dos sobreditos q vem a malaq a com 
Juncos & pamgajauas E naaos & os q nom vem vam la De malaca 
como se dira meudamemte no tit 0 de cada huua finallm te que o porto 
De malaq a mujtas vezes se acharam nelle oitemta & qoatro limguo- 
ajes cada huua p sy segumdo afirmam em malaq a os moradores E 
ysto estantes em malaca porque no arcepeleguo Das Jlhas que co- 
mecam em symgapura he carymam atee maluquo ha quoremta 
linguoajes sabidas q he Jmfinjdade dilhas & 

porque os Do Cairo E meq a & dadem nom podem cheguar em 
huua moucam a malaq a E asy os parses & dormuz & Rumes turqos & 
Jeragoes a estas semelhamtes como sam armenjos a seu tempo vem ao 
Regno Do guzarate E trazem suas copias De mercadarias gramdes & 
de valija & vem ao Dito Regno Do guzarate tomar suas companhias 
em as ditas naaos Da terra E tomam as ditas companhias grosa memte 
trazem tambem dos ditos Regnos a cambaia mercadorias da valia Do 


primeiro 
dos guza- 
rates & 
dos mer- 
cadores q 
em suas 
naaos 
tratam a 
malaqua 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


guzarate De que fazem mujto proueito os Do cairo trazem as merca- 
dorias ao toro E do toro a Judaa & de Juda a adem E De adem a cam- 
baia homde vendem na terra as De sua valia & as out a s trazem a 
malaq a por companhias como dito he//. 

Hos do cairo trazem as mercadarias que as galeafas De veneza Merca- 

trazem / sam mujtas armaas graas pan5s De laa De cores corail cobre dorias Q ue 
~ ° r trazem os 

azougue Vmelha pregaduras prata comtarias cristalinos vidros Dou- do cairo 

rados// ® os 

Dadem 

Hos De mequa trazem gramde copia Dafiam aguoa Rosada & Emequa 
mercadorias fasy como estas estoraque liqujdo mujto//. 

Hos Dadem trazem ao guzarate gramde copija Dafiam pasas 
Duuas Rujva anjll agoa Rosada prata aljofar E out a s timtas que 
sam Da valia De cambaya //. 

Nestas companhias vem os parses turquos tuqmaees E armenjos & 
vem tomar Suas companhias por seu frete a guzarate E dali embar- 
quam em margo E partem Camjnho De malaq a Rota batida E da 
torna viajem vam polas ylhas de diua //. 

Vem cadano Do guzarate A malaq a quoatro naaos vail a merca- 
daria De cada naao qujnze mjll cz dos vinte mjll trimta mjll ho menos 
he qnze mjll E da cidade De cambaia vem cadano huua esta vail 
setemta oitemta mjll cz dos sem duujda nenhuua//. 

A mercadoria que trazem sam panos de trimta sortes que sam da 
valia destas partes trazem asy mesmo pu?ho que he Raiz como 
Rujpontuo he cacho he como barro trazem aguoa Rosada amfiam 
De cambaia & dadem trazem sememtes graos alcatifas em?enso 
mujto trazem quoremta man ras De mercadorias // o Reino de 
cambaia & de daque ate honor se chama Jndia pm a E asy se chama 
cada huu destes Rex e seus titollos Rex da Jndia ambos sam pode- 
rosos De gramde Jemte De cavallo & de pee//. De iij e annos a esta 
parte tem Rex mouros estes dous Regnos o Regno de cambaya he 
demais avamtajem q ho daquem em tudo/ 

Ho Retorno primcipall he crauo ma^as noz nozcada samdallbs Fol. 174V. 
aljofar por^elanas poucas almjzqr pouco leuam Jmfimdo lenho aloes 
De botiq a leuam alguu beijoym fynall memte q destas espiciarias 
carregua E do all leuam meaa memte E o all leuam ouro seda Jmfimda 


H.C.S. II. 



Cananor 
calecut 
cochim 
coulam 
q se 

chamam 
mala- 
bares/l . 


Retorno 

De 

malaq a 
pa a bonua 
qlim 


498 TOM li PIRES 

bramq a leuam estanho mujtos damasquos bramqos fazem muj t0 por 
elles seda de cores pasaros q vem de bamdan pa penachos pa os 
Rumes E turcos & arrabios valem laa mujto estes tem o primcipall 
trato De malaq a paguam De drjtos sets por 9emto E se querem or^ar 
as naaos por avaliadores pagua o que se Julgua asy se custuma Dos 
guzarates por escusar sogeiyoees De mamdaris por que alem de sejs 
por cemto paguam ao bemdara lasamane tumunguo & o xabamdar 
de cemto huu pano E a cada huu segumdo cada huu qem hee o que 
os mercadores ham por gramde apresam E portamto fazem orfa- 
memto Da naao & ao menos a naao Do guzarate he avaliada em sete 
cates De timas que sam vymte & huu mjll cz dos E disto pagua a 
Rezam De seis por cemto//. 

os de chaull & dabull E gu5a vem tomar suas companhias a 
bemgalla & dalij vem a malaca/ E tambem as tomam e calecut 

Destes se dira qmdo se falar Das cousas de bemgalla 

Estes malabares fazem sua companhia na bonua qlim que he 
choromamdell he paleacate E vem em companhias mas o nome he 
qlljs E nom malabares// choromamdell E paleacate E naor estes sam 
os portos da costa De choromamdell ho primeiro he/ caile/ he 
calicate/ adaram/ patana/ naor / turjmalapatam/ carecall teregam parj / 
tirjmalacha/ calaparaoo/ conjmjrj paleacate//. 

Hos malabares vem tomar suas companhias a paleacate trazem 
mercadarias do guzarate E os de choromamdell trazem Roupa 
quelim baixa vem cadano a malaq a tres quatro naos valera Cada 
huua Doze qinze mjll cz dos E de paleacate vem huua naao E duas vail 
cada naao oitemta novemta mjll cz dos ou Junco nom vail menos 
trazem trimta sortes de pannos E rriqos De mujta valia pagam em 
malaq a seis por 9emto estes quelijs tem a mercadaria em peso E o 
trato De malaq a mais que outra Jeraca // 

Retornam ho primcipall samdallos bramcos por que os vermelhos 
na9em na bonua qlim he vail ho baar huu cz d0 E meio E avera Dez 
naaos cadano se as quisere he leuam camfora de pamchur que he da 
bamda do sudueste E na Jlha de 9omotora vail menos esta he de 
comer pedra hume seda bramq a aljofar pimemta noz pouca ma9as 
poucas he pouco crauo cobre mujto estanho pouco fruseleira da mais 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


499 


baixa calanbac damasqos brocados da china ouro/ pagam demtrada 
seis por yemto E da saida nada partem daquj em Janeiro E tornam 
em outubro poem huu mes de yda E outro de vimda he alguuas 
vezes vaao daq a paleacate em Juncos dos de malaq a E os qujlijs sam 
Do Reyno De narsingua sam Jemtios //. 

Porque Ja o Recomtamemto & descriya das terras hee fey to Resta Drjtos 

aguora falar dos drjtos que os mercadores do ponemte pagauam em que se ^ 

malaca quamdo vinham com suas mercadorias .s. mercadores dadem me rcado~ 

& com os dadem os de meq a & dormuz parses co estes todo ho na do 

ponemte 

guzarate chaull dabull o Regnno De guoa E caleyut o Regno do m 
malabar yeilam caile choromamdell paleacate todo o Regnuo dos malaqua 
qlijs que he narsymgua o Regno Dorixa bemgalla Racam peguu 
syam/ este peguu & syam pagaua dritos das mercadorias & dos 
mamtimetos presemte todo mamtimemto he de presemte em todas 
estas terras Da bamda de tanary qedaa pedir payee estes se chama 
do ponemte estes todos pagam em malaqua de yemto seis E sem 
estas companhias | vem mercadores malaios ou dout a s nayoees que Fol. 175V. 
tem molheres & asemto em malaqua paguam tres por cemto E alem 
deste dijto Reall de seis por cemto ao estramgeiro he tres ao naturall 
se pagua presemte ao Rey E ao bemdara E ao tumuguo & xabamdar 
da tall nacam e estes presemtes valeram huu por yemto E dous 
segumdo o xabamdar o detremjna asy o dam os mercadores por que 
os xabamdares sam comformes aos mercadores he Das mesmas nacoes 
dos mercadores E as vezes dam mais segumdo os xabamdares qerem 
estar com ho Rey & mamadarijs E ysto fey to vemdem liurem te o seu / /. 

tem tabem outra maneira nas Naos gramdes as vezes a comsemti- outra 
memto do Rey avaliayoes Ja se sabe nao de tall lugar traz mercadaria n ™ netra 
que vail tamto chamam dez mercadores cimq 0 quelijs & cimq 0 dizymar 
doutra nayam E pamte o Juiz da alfamdegua que era o tumungam 
Jrmao Do bemdara avaliam & Recebem os drjtos & presemtes & por 
que se ysto nom fazija cada huu tiraua E o trato he tarn gramde que 
os guardas furtam he por escusar furtos & tiranjas se fazia ysto E 
tambem se achaua que os avaliadores era grosamemte peytados E por 
ysto se osaua poucas vezes//. 

He custume amtiguo de malaqua que tamto que chegaua os maneira 



de como 
se fazia 
os precos 
eni 

malaq a H 


terras q 
paguam 
somenite 
pre- 
Semtes 
& nam 
outs 0 
Drjtds & 


Drjtos Da 
terra 


500 TOM Ii PIRES 

mercadores descarregauam & pagauam seus drjtos ou presemtes 
como se dira / ajumtauase dez ou vymte mercadores com ho sor da 
tall mercadaria E estauam aas vezes he por os taes mercadores se 
detremjnaua o pre90 e por elles se Repartia por todos segumdo cada 
huu era & por que o tempo era curto & as mercadarias mujtas era 
Despachados e emtam os mercadores De malaq a Recolhiam as 
mercadarias as suas naos & vemdiam a seu prazer do que Re9ebyam 
os tratamtes despacho & ganho E os mercadores da terra faziam seus 
proueytos & por este custume vyvija a terra em hordenam^a & tinham 
despacho & ysto se fazia asy ordenadamemte que nom compraziam 
ao mercador da nao nem se partia com escamDollo por que a ley das 
mercadarias em malaq a sam mujto sabidas & os pre90s & 

Todo levamte nom pagua DrjtSs Das mercadarias somemte 
presemtes ao Rey E as pessoas nomeadas .s. pahao & todollos lugares 
atee china todalas Jlhas Jaoao bamdam maluq 0 palimbao & todos os da 
Jlha de 9omotora & os presemtes sam Razoada memte compridos 
querem pare9er drjtos/ avia taxadores que or9avam ysto se custumaua 
geerall memte & os presemtes da chijna era mores q de toDas partes 
& estes presemtes Releua gramdememte por que hee gramde a 
comtia dos nauegamtes que pagaua presemtes & se em malaq a 
vemdia Juncos emtam se pagaua De drjtos duas tres tumdaias douro 
por casquo E esto he do Rey de malaq a & despois se ordenou que 
de cada iij e cz dos se pagasem de drjtos quymze cz dos & ysto Re- 
cadaua os xabamdares das na9oes pa o Rey todos mamtimetos paga 
presemtes & nam drjtos// 

nom pode nemhuu homem vemder casa nem quymtaa sem 
licem9a do Rey da terra ou do bemdara & da vemda da qmta polla 
licem9a do tall casall emcabecado se paguaua presemte segumdo era 
tinha tambem malaca das vemdedeiras tanto por mes & ysto era dado 
aos mamdarijs/ pollas Ruas aRuadas de tall madarij tall & tall doutro 
porque em malaca em todalas Ruas vemdem & ysto era esptall de 
p as pobres de samgue/ & por gramde mer9e se daua ao morador que 
podese ter diamte De sua porta temda pa poder vemder ou aluguar 
tem tambem dritos das fruytas & pescados/ ysto era pouca cousa //. 

Alem dos dritos o pmcipall drito que tinha hee o peso do dachim 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


501 

de toda a mercadoria q emtraua & saya De cada cem Calais que valia 
em mercadoria se pagaua huu & disto tinha o Rey espiuaes & Re£e- 
bedores & tudo se pesaua atee camdeas de breu & ysto Jmportaua 
ao dito tempo muyto //. 

A moeda de malaqua se fez por calajs em timas tymas chamam Fol. 175V. 

estanho a moeda Destanho meuda sam caixas valiam cada cemto , . 

Moeda de 

homze Rs & quoatro ceytis a rreza De cem Calais em timas por tres malaq a he 

cz d°s ca da cem caixas he huu calaim & pesa trinta & tres omfas valia das 

. 10 tymas & 

escasas E toda a mercadana se faz por Calais & pagam por estanho & do ouro & 

por ouro as caixas sam como ?eytijs com ho nome do Rey q emtam P rata 

Reyna & tambem corre as dos Reis pasados as pecas do estanho sam 

oytemta & valem cem Calais tres cz dos / /. 

Tem malaqua serafijs de cambaia & dormuz correm & noso cz d0 xarafijs 
cada serafym vail vymte sete Calais que sam iij e xx te ris o cz d0 vail czdos 
trimta & tres & huu tergo a Reza de tres por cem Calais corre Dramas 
de pagee & moedas de prata/ / 

o menos ouro que vem a malaq a he o de burney he de quoatro valia do 
mates & m° & cimquo & cimq 0 & meyo & seis & depois de laue he de ouro 
sete mates sete m° & despois o da Jaoa doyto mates & doyto & m° & o 
de paham hee desta valia E mais alto alguua pouca cousa & o de 
menamcabo hee De noue mates & o dos quelijs he de noue & huu 
tergo & de noue & meyo asy he o de cauchychina este he o melhor 
ouro destas partes he ouro De cz d0 he de noue mates & m° esforcados 
easy dous ter^os//. 

o peso de malaca he taeell tambem se chama tumdaya tem esta Taellou 
tumdaia dezaseis mazes tem cada maz quoatro cupSes tem cada tunda y a 
cupom vimte cumderis pesa esta tumdaya Do noso peso onze oitauas 
& m a menos seis graos & m °j 

A valia do ouro hee segumdo tem os mates o mate tem o dobro dos valia do 
calajs desta maneira o ouro De quoatro mates vail o maz o oyto Calais ouro 
& o de quoatro mates & m° vail ho maz a noue calajs E o de cimquo 
mates vail ho maz a dez & o de dez mates vail ho maz a oyte calajs a 
esta Rezam fazes a comta desta maneira o ouro doyto mates vail o 
maz a xbj calajs dezaseis vezes xbj sam ij e lbj Calais a Rezam de ?em 
Calais por tres cz dos se faz ha comta// 



TOME PIRES 


Valia da 
prata 


pesos de 
malaq a J 
tempo 
pas ado/. 

cate de 
merca- 
doria 


Fol. ij6r. 

Outro 

bahaar 


bahaar Da 


502 

o cate do ouro De malaq a tem vymte taees fazes vosa comta vimte 
vezes duzemtos & cyquoemta & seis sam cimq 0 mjll E ?emto & 
vymte & por esta man ra se trata a valia do ouro & sam tocadores do 
ouro postos polio Rey E tinha o Rey dado este ofifio a quem lhe Daua 
cadano meio cate douro E nam leua ao Rey nem a mandarijs por tocar 
ouro nemhuua cousa & ao pouo leuaua de cada taell huu calaim que 
sam xj ris afora o q leuaua na pedra que he pouco menos dout° calaym 
porque sam pedras de barrocos autas a esta Rapyna & out 0 nom 
podia tocar ouro senom este e este he em malaq a bom ofifio E vay 
muyto nelle porque he de gramde credito// 

A pata de peguu valiam tres taees cem Calais E prata de sya & da 
china valia o taell no tempo pasado a quoremta Calais aguora valem as 
cousas mais alguua cousa vynha mujta prata a malaq a /. 

o taell De malaq a ou tumdaia hera de xj oytauas & m a o cate tem 
’ vynte tundaias a Rezam de cyma menos seis graos & m° vail o cate do 
ouro vymte & oyto onfas & meia por este cate se pesa ouro pta al- 
mjzquer camfora de comer calambac he aljofar // 

o cate da mercadoria tem vymte & tres taees Dos que avemos dito 
pesa xxxij on^as & tres qtas & vimte & cimquo grabs / a faragola de 
malaq a tem dez cates destes deste cate E destas mercadarias quamdo 
compraees por bahar dam duzemtos cates .s. de almjzqr e papos seda 
bramca & de cores amfyam azougue cobre vermelham alaq e qas E 
outras mercadorias a estas semelhamtes pesa o bahar darrates do peso 
velho tres qmtaes duas arrobas & vinte arrates & seis omcas & huu 
terfo de m a //. 

E a ley de malaqua no peso do bahaar das mercadorias deste titollo 
qmdo compraes baar hade dar duzemtds & cimquo cates pimemta 
crauo noz ma?as beijoym lacar emcem^o brasyll pedra vme mjrabu- 
lanos emxofre pucho E cousas a estas semelhantes E tem este bahar 
segumdo tenho lam?ada comta como dito he Acregentalhe mais 
cimquo cates / tres quymtaees tres aRobas sete aRates nove omfas 
& trinta & tres graaos este he o da ley de malaq a segundo a comta 
q lhe fiz & polla melhbr man ra que lha pude lan^ar // & asy ficou 
este dachym/ 

qmdo o guouernador das Jmdias se partio De malaq a mamdou 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


503 

horgar por Ruy daraujo o dachim gramde da espegiaria que ficaua na feitoria dt 

feitoria foy detremynado por asemto que o dito dachim pesaua tres ma ^ a( l 1 

qujmtaes & tres aRobas E seis arrates do peso velho & asy he espta a 

especiaria em despesa q se pesou// 

qmdo eu vym a malaca por espuam da dita feytoria & comtador 

detremjney de tomar certidam do dachim & tomey Jnteira memte & 

achaua que o dito dachim pesaua Justam te tres qujmtaes & tres 

aRobas & vymte sete arrates do peso velho nunca me foy crido tra- 

balhey tamto que se mamdou a cochim por chumbo o peso de huu 

bahar mamdarom dizer de cochim q Justamete pesaua o dito dachim 

polio peso de cochim tres qintaes & tres arr a s & vimte seis arrates eu 

me afirmo q nom foy bem pesado asy esta aguora detremjnado que 

tamto pesa diguo ysto pa o diamte Respomder e cochim & tambem a q 

he pesada q levaua a orgameto de tres qujmtaees & tres aRobas & 

seis arrates porq perdera ellRey noso s5r vinte aRates e cada baar/ 

por q nom temos medidas pavermos de medir pesey o arroz q leua medida da 

huua gamta Da ley de malaqa achey q pesaua Justamete DaRoz tres 

arrates & dez omgas Do peso nouo se laa este peso se lamcar e huua azeyte 

vasylha bem se podera ver pollas medidas qmto tera dazeyte ou vin/l0S 
.... vinagres- 

doutro liqor / 

Ja dito he largamemte das cousas de malaq a no tempo pasado/ 
posto que mujto mais do comtado se comtenha em malaca porque 
sem duujda nom sey no que toca ao trato da mercadaria ysto nom 
pode deixar de ser perto De cabo & ftm De mougoees & pincipio 
dout a s aguora Recomtarey de como foy tomada & do q socedeo atee o 
tempo de mjnha partida pa cochim & dos Reis q aq sam vasallos & 
out°s amiguos & das terras que aquj tratarom & de como se a cidade 
vay Recobrando & Reformamdo de mercadores & de que partes 
vierom & despois da tomada de malaq a aquy tratar 

cheguou a 0 dalboquerq e capitam moor & g dor das Jmdias na 
emtrada do mes de Julho na era De mjl b e & omze a malaca com 
dezaseis vellas gramdes & pequenas e q viria pouco mais ou menos 
mjll bj e omees de peleja em o quail tempo se afirma malaqua ter gem 
mjll homees Darmas Des coala penagy ate certam (?) & cagam que 
he o termo da cidade de malaq a & tinham os malaios tranqueiras 



504 TOME PIRES 

m tas & fortes & no maar avya mujtas lamcharas & paraos em o Rijo 
& no mar mujtos Juncos & naos guzaratas que estauam prestes pa 
pelejar porque estaua emtam e malaca huu capitam dos guzarates & 
trabalhaua pa a guerra se fazer pare?eedolhe q elle soo abastaua pas 
nosas naos & gemtes qmto mals a Jmfynijdade Da gemte da terra 
posto que a gemte nom era da emtemcam do Rey de malaq a por q 
nas terras de trato homde o pouo he de diuersas nacoees nom po- 
dem estes taes ter amor a seu Rey como tern o pouo naturall sem 
mistur a doutr a s na 9 oes ysto gerall memte se vee & poriso o Rey de 
malaq a nom se pode sofrer posto q os seus mamdaris pelejarom e yso 
qmdo poderom & 

Fol. iy6v. asy que cheguado o dito capitam mor com sua frota se deteue 
alguus dias em Recados de paz escusamdo a guerra quamto a elle 
foy posyvell porem a leujdam dos malaios & oufanja nom pesada & 
comselho soberbo dos Jaos & sua pesunca he coracam Emdure^do/ 
& luxurioso tlrano soberbo do Rey porque noso s5r lhe tinha or- 
Denado a pagua da gramde treicam que comtra os nosos cometeo 
Junto todo ysto Ja nunca qserom comsemtir na vomtade da paz 
somemte com Recados malaios se detiverom afortalecemdose qmto 
podiam parecemdolhe q nam era gemte no mudo poderosa pa os 
destroir asy q trabalhamdo o dito gouernador ouue a maao Ruy 
daraujo E os que com elle estaua catiuos/ o Rey numca qujs a paz 
acomselhado polio seu lasamane que o fizese & p5r ho bemdara & 
por o seu cerina de Raja mas segundo ho comselho seu & de seu 
f° q despois matou & de tuam bamda & tuam mafamut & de vtamu- 
tarraja & de seu f° pate acoo & dos guzarates & pati$a e dout°s 
fidallguos man?ebos q ao Rey se faziam cabaees amoquos Ja numq a 
qs etemder em cousa de paz dizemdolhe os ca^izes que a nam 
fizesem & os seus moulanas q pois a Jmdia era Ja nas maos dos 
portugueses que o nom fose malaqua com gemte Jmfiell Devul- 
guouse a terrain do Rey & foy cousa necesaria na hear o dito Rey 
se castiguo do que fez & do mao comselho q tomaua//. 

O guouernador avido comselho saltou com sua Jemte em terra 
tomou a cidade & o Rey fogio & sua gemte/ tornouse o capita mor a 
Recolher as naaos e ese dia & nom comsemtio que lhe fizesem dano 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 505 

pa vr se degiria ho Dito Rey de sua Detremjnagam ostinada. nom 
qujs o Rey fynallmente que tornou o dito gouernador e terra Ja com 
detremjnacam de tomar a cidade & de nom aVr Ja amizade com o 
Dito Rey / tomou a cidade & ouuea a sua maao foy fugimdo o Rey 
De malaq a & as f a s & todos seus gemrros Rey de campar & de pahao 
foromse ao bretao q he o asemto dos Reis & o capitam mor se 
apoderou da cidade foy a cidade he maar esbulhada & feytos oficiaes 
diso I/ 

Comegou ho capitam mor De fazer fortaleza de madeira por nom 
aVr pedra & caall & neste meio tempo se deu hordem pa a call 
tornouse a desfazer a da madeira & fezerom a famosa fortaleza 
Demtro na sua mezquita gramde omde ora estaa forte com dous 
pogos dauga doge nas torres aRedor out°s dous ou tres De huu cabo 
Da o mar nella & dout 0 o Rijo os muros da fortalez a sam de gramde 
largura a torre Da menagem poucas achara omde se ellas costumam 
taees & asy de cimqo sobradQs Joga artelharia de todas quoatro 
bamdas grosa & meuda neste meio tempo forom degollados vtemuta 
Raja & seu f° & seu Jenrro & huu seu paremte por serem achados e 
damcas malaias & qererem escureger o crauo//. 

o Rey foyse do bretam a muar & alij quisera matar o Rey audela 
Rey de campar & seu Jenrro & o mogo fogio pa campar & atee oje 
nom forom mais amiguos a noso parecer/ o Rey foyse ao Regno de 
pahao & la o f° do Rey de pao qsera matar o Rey q foy de malaq a 
pa lhe tomar o tesouro que leuaua que ajmda tern fogio o Rey pa 
bimtam homde ate aguora estaa Deixemos q em muar foy Desbara- 
tado vymdo pa vpe por que sam cousas q destas sam feitas e malaq a 
muytas q se nom espeuem //. 

Foy a terra Regebemdo os mercadores & vierom se mujtos foy 
dada a guouernaga Da nagao quelim ao bemdar a njna chatuu com o 
oficio de bemdara foy daDo a regimo de Raja mouro lugao a guo- 
Vmanga dos lugoes parses malaios foy dado a elle o ofigio De 
tumunguo foy Dado a tuam colaxcar a goVrnanga diler foy dado a 
pate qdir a gouernanca dup e o pate qdir Jaao alevamtouse com ho 
djr° de vtamutaRaJa & fez a guerra e aqll morrerom | alguus purtu- Fol. 1777. 
gueses amtre os quaees foy Ruy daraujo despois foy destruydo & 



TOME PIRES 


Reis tra- 
butarios 
a ellRey 
noso sdr 
S? out°s 
amiguos 
vasallos/ 


lugares de 
que vem a 
malaq a a 
tratare no- 
so tempo/, 
lugares 
homde os 
nosos 
Juncos 
& naaos 
forom/j 

nacoes de 
merca- 
dores q ha 
em malaqa 


506 

lamcado fora o pate qujdir fogio & tornouse pa Jaoa & matou m tos 
mercadores Dupe & Roubou qmto elles tinha despois disto foy 
asesegamdo a terra & comegou a Repousar tornaramse mujtos homees 
a pouoar a terra & dalij por diamte se melhorou/ neste meio tempo 
ajumtou a Jaoa todo seu poder & veio diamte de malaca com fern 
vellas em que vinria quoremta Juncos & sesemta lamcharas & gem 
calaluzes & traziam cimq 0 mjll homeies sairom a elles as nossas 
naaos de que os Jabs se agastarom & tornaro se co a maree. & leixa- 
rom todo & Recolherom se nos calaluzes E saluaromse no Junquo 
grande & em out°s dous todollos outros ford qeymados & a Jemte 
nelles & out°s afoguados E outros catiuos E nom hee duujda ser 
esta a mais fremosa frota q purtugueses nunq a virom na Jmdia nem 
De gemte tam homrrada E forom desbaratados mujto mais fremosa 
mete Do quail noso sor seja louuado pa sempe porque tall feyto nom 
he e nosas maads & porque noso sdr nom tarda com sua Justiga 
amamsada foy a Jemte da Jaoa & morta a de palimbao que veio com 
pate onuz da qll cousa nom Recebeo mujto descomtemtameto o guste 
pate Da Jaoa nem o sdr de tubam// 

EllRey de pao & de campar & de amdarguery vasallos trebutarios 
amyguos vasallos q espeuem q sam espauos DellRey noso sor/ os 
Reis De menamcabo de daruu de pagee de peguu/ amiguo ellRey de 
syam/ os Reis de maluco por espauos se comtam & asy o tern espto 
os pates Da Jaoa o sor daguagij De tubam de cadao / o sdr de curubaia 
amiguo vasallo q se daa por espauo/ o Rey de gumda out 0 tamto o 
guste patee Da Jaoa & dout°s Reis & sres cartas embaixadores cada 
dia o Rey de burney espauo se chama/ 

Vierom guzarates malabares quelijs bemgallas peguus pagee daruu 
Jaos chijs menamcabo De tamjompura De macagar de burney 
lugoees 

as nosas naos a Jaoa a bamdam/ a china Junco E a pacee a palea- 
cate/ aguora vam a timor por samdollos & vam a outras partes foy 
Ja noso Jumco a peguu ao porto de martaniane//. 

muytos mercadores qujlijs alguus Jaos parses bemgallas De pagee 
de pahao chijs he doutras nacoes lucoes burneus ho pouoo he de 
mujtas mesturas & vay cregemdo nom pode malaca Deixar de tornar 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


507 


ao que era E mais avamtejada porque tera nosas mercadarias E 
mujto mais folgam os tratamtes comnosquo q com os malaios por 
Reza Da mais verdade & Justi?a que lhe fazemos/ 

malaqua vaise melhoramdo em Junc5s compram os mercadores de 
malaq a Juncos fazem gudoees noua memte vay a terra em creci- 
memto comecanse a cheguar & a mester Regra E odenanca neste 
primfipio & leis pa sempre E pa malaqua avya mester salomom pa 
a guouernar & ella o mer e?ee// 

Trato da Jaoa o senhorio aparelha seu Juco de todo o que lhe he a maneira 
necesario se queres huua peitaca ou duas metes dous ou tres homes que tem os 

1 r merqa- 

pa oulhare por ela & tratar & marcar o que leuaes & qmdo tornaes a dores que 

malaq a pagaes de cemto vymte do q meteis em malaq a no Junco E 

pagaees vos dono da mercadarja presemte Do que trazeis/ & se carregam 

metestes em malaq a cem cz dos a torna viagem aves Duzemtos amtes P a f ora ® 

, alhedsj I . 

de paguar ao senhorio Do Jumq °jj. 

Se eu mercador que estou em malaq a dou a vos srio do Jumco ?em Fol. 177V. 
czdos em mercadoria polio pre?o q emtam vail em malaqa tomamdo 
meu Risquo a torna viagem me Dam ?ento & quoremta sem mais 
outra cousa & pagam segundo hordenam^a De malaca Da chegada 
do Junco ao porto a quoremta & qoat° dias// 

A Viajem da Jada hee no pincipio de Janeiro a pimeira mou^ao 
e tornam de mayo e Diamte atee aguosto setembro daquelle anno// 
pa cumda vos Dam cimcoemta por ?emto porque podem trazer f U mda 
pimemta e espavos hee terra De mais mercadoria & trato/ he mais 
o ganho pouca cousa ho tpo Da viagem he todo huu // 
todos estes quoatro lugares vos dam cimqoemta por 9 emto Tam- 
tomamdo o q mete o Risq 0 Do maar sam as viagees todas de huu J om P ura 
tempo easy/ pagam pola maneira q he Dito //. 

estes tres lugares pagua segumdo ley da terra trimta & cimqo pagee 
por femto de vyagem he mais segura a nauega^am // & mais 
breue// 

Siam peeguu sam de cinqoemta por ^emto a Risquo como dito Siatn^ 
hee & se metees mercadoria aves de huu dous a torna viagem pa- & g 
gamdo todo o drjto fica huu por out 0 & as vezes mais & detense nas 
viages oyto noue meses/ 



TOME PIRES 


bemgala 

paleacate 


fhyna 


partido 

que 

faziam ao 
rrey De 
malaqua 
Do que 
metiam 
nojunco 


custume 
da pagua 


Fol. iy8r. 


508 

estes dous lugares fazem a viagem dano em anno destes dam huu 
por outro segumdo hordenamfa & oytemta por ^emto & nouemta & 
quem carregua pa estes dous lugares as vezes ha tres por huu// 

china he boa viajem E mais & quem carregua tomamdo peitacas 
as vezes ha tres por huu e e boas mercadarias q se despacham 
loguo //. 

E porque este meter nos Juncos he cousa em q se faz gramdememte 
proueyto por partirem por mou^oes hordenadas ho rrey de malaq a se 
aproueytava muyto dam ao Rey huu tergo que a out a & o Rey faz 
aaquelle q leua seu Dinhr 0 franco de drjtos De maneira que se achaua 
que por o tall meter nos Juncos se alcamcava gramde copia douro & 
nom pode ser menos & aquj vinha os Reis de paao & campar & am- 
darguery & out°s por seus feitores meter dr° nos ditos Juncos Jsto 
Jmporta gramdememte pa quem teuer cabedall porq malaca despacha 
Juncos pa fora & out°s emtram & sam em tamta copia q nom podia 
leixar de ser o Rey Rico/ & o tall mercador q leua o dr° do Rey ha 
partido cobra oufanja & liberdade & Recebemno de boa vomtade he 
pagam ha seu tempo disto tinha o Rey oficiaees De Receber as merca- 
darias & daar os taes dijtos & ysto era enexo alfamdegua de que tin- 
ham carreguo $eryna De Raja Jrmaao Do bemdara//. 

Se quamdo se acaba o tempo o dito mercador nom tern ouro pa 
paguar paga na mercadoria pola valia da terra & quamdo paga em 
mercadorya he mais proueito pa quem estaa dasemto asy he custume 
se vos nom comtratastes de vos pagarem em ouro mas o tratamte nom 
quer ouro senom mercadoria por que de huu dia pa o out 0 sobem as 
mercadorias & por que o comer^o de todo o mundo De quail quer 
maneira se faz em malaq a / / 

E quem quiser semtir qmto proueyto ellRey noso sor deue de 
percallgar com malaca a sua fazemda <perto que apagada a autoridade 
q este malvado rrey que foy de malaqa ajmda semea & tambem vi- 
sytada hua | vez a Jaada por seguramca dos anjmos dos tratamtes he 
nauegamtes E de Reis que ajmda estam com credito Das palauras 
falsas Do Rey de bymtao que huu dia espalha ^izanja nos paremts que 
nom podemos apaguar em huu anno// hee malaq a de tamanho peso & 
proueito q me pare?e que no mundo nom tem sua Jguoall//: 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 


509 

Note cada huu que a vir pesoa que em malaca seja a bastamte pa Rezam 

cadano mamdar Jumco a chyna E outro a bemgala & outro a palea- da S ram - 

deza de 

cate & outro a peguu & nestes tomamdo companhias os mercadores malaq a 
de malaca & pa as out a s ptes/ a vir feitor delRey noso sor que car- 
regue Dr° & mercadoria tamto por cento como dito hee E a vir outra 
pesoa pa ter carreguo da allfamdegua De rreceber drjtos com ofi- 
?iaees quenpode duujdar que em malaqa fara baares douro E nom 
avera mester Dr° da Jmdia mas daq Jra pa 11a E nom falo de bamdam 
& maluco porque hee a menos cousa Do mundo hir laa toda a espici- 
aria sem custar nada por que malaq a paga soldos mamtimemtds & 
fara tesouro & mamdara toda especiaria se for grangeada tratada & 

Regida & teuer gemte como meretpe// as cousas gramdes nom se pode 
sostemtar com pouca gemte/ Deuese malaca favorecer com gemte 
meter huua & tirar out a fauoregella De manjficos oficiaes sabedores 
Das mercadorias amiguos da paz nom soberbos nem altarados nem 
Desmamdados nem luxuriosos mas comtinemtes a velhos que malaq a 
nom tern oficiall De cabellos bramcos// a criam?a cortesaa & o trato 
da mercadoria nom se comformam & pois ysto se nom pode dout a 
maneira fazer ao menos seja Ja a Jdade pois o all se nom pode achar 
nom podem os homes estymar a vomdade De malaca por Rezam De 
sua gramdeza proueytosa/ malaca he cidade que foy feyta pa a merca- 
doria mais auta que todallas Do mundo cabo de mougoees primcipio 
dout a s / he cercada malaca & Jaz no meio E o trato & comer^io de 
huuas na?oees a out a s De mjll leguoas de cada bamda a malaca hamde 
vijr pois cousa que tamanha hee & de tamta Riqueza & que em ne- 
nhuu tempo Do mundo nom pode escair como for meaa memte 
guoVrnada & fauore<?ida Deuese prouer olhar estimar fauorefer E 
nom se poer em esque^ymemto por que malaq a estaa cercada De 
mafomede que nom pode ser amigo senom quamdo malaca tiuer 
for?a E nom sera fiell emtam ajmda a mourama comnosquo senom 
por for?a q sempre estam em espreita & como vem quallquer cousa 
descuberta Dam com a frecha & pois he sabido quam proueitosa hee 
malaca pa o temporall qmto mais ao esprituall que mafomede Jaz no 
saquo he no pode mais hir adiamte E fogese qmto pode & a Jemte que 
fauoreca huu partido que a mercadoria fauorece nosa fee E Vrdade he 



TOM Ji PIRES 


destrujrse mafomede o que nom pode deixar de ser Destroido & gerto 
he q este mumdo de qua he mais Riquo mais estimado q ho mumdo 
das Jmdias por que a menos mercadaria De quaa hee ouro que menos 
se estima e e malaq a tem por mercadoria quem for sdr De malaq a tem 
a maao na garganta a veneza. atee malaq a E De malaqa atee china & 
de china a maluco & de maluqo a Ja5a & da Jaoa a malaca gamotora 
catiua he de noso poder quem ysto emtemde fauorecera malaca nom 
se ponha em esquegimeto por que mais prezam os alhos & gebolas e 
malaca que almjzqueres beijois & out a s cousas Ricas //. 

E porque estamdo eu neste paso Espeuemdo falegeo ho bemdara 
njna chatuu aos vynte E sete dias De Janeiro de qujnhemtos E 
quatorze Domjmguo// eu com mais Rezam deuo lememtar sobre 
' malaqua/ seja notorio a todos que ellRey nosso s5r perdeo mais por 
morte Do bemdara Do que perderom os propeos seus ffilhos por que 
era leall Vrdadeiro serujdor De sua altez a / morreo o bemdara huus 
Dizem que morreo De nojo outros dizem que tomou peconha pa 
morrer amtes q vise guouernar o Rey De campar E quamdo qujs 
morrer choraDo dise se o gramde Rey de purtugall s5r Das Jmdias 
ou o seu gouernador nom homrrar meus filhos despois De mjnha 
morte ds nam sera Ds cuytada De ty malaqua pois ho Vrdadeiro 
amiguo & serujdor dellRey De purtugall morre// E gerto sem duujda 
morto he huu dos esteos de malaq a que a sostinha a serujgo do Dito 
s5r praza a noso s5r que njna chatuu nom nos faga a mjmguoa que 
todos cujdamos & se per vemtura eu nom chegase dyamte Da p a 
DellRey noso s5r ou do seu guouemador das Jmdias aquj diguo q a 
morte De njna chatuu obriga malaca a ter mais duzemtos purtugueses 
Dos que lhe era negesarios pa seu sostemtamemto/ E como gramde- 
memte o g dor Das Jmdias Deue vljr sem Detemga a malaq a com 
poder porque nom he menos Romaria que a de mequa E apagara o 
credito do Rey de bymtam E amamsara a soberba Dos Jaaos ouujra 
os mercadores De malaq a Darlhea Regedor comforme a sua nagam 
porque a mercaDoria he huua armonja sobre sy o Rejedor q a Reger 
hade fauoregela que Doutra maneira nom se poderam soster os 
mercadores os quaes amdam escamdalizados & moujdos pola noua 
etrada do Rey De campar em malaqua a quail foy muy odiosa e es- 



PORTUGUESE TEXT 511 

candalosa & perdoe noso sor a quem tall ardill leuou ao sor capitam 
Jeerall por q mais he Dijno De castiguo que de /. 

Aguora he maneco bumj de malaca com titollo de guouernador/ 
Raja audelaa Rey De canpar he 111090 E samdeu E malaio sobrinho 
do Rey de bymtam casado com sua filha / nom cujdo que frujtificara 
em malaca & porque o sor capitam mo5r ysto mamdou por emforma- 
9am que lhe seria dada pa ysto fazer he certo que moujdo De bom 
zello o faria porque sua ssenhoria nom querera ver a perda Do 
Regnuo bem avemturado que ganhou este deue De nom consentir 
o Dito malaio em malaqua nem outro nemhuu mas botallo loguo E 
meter quem seia fora De samgue malayo porque capitam abasta pa 
Reger he gouernar com gouernador comforme aas nacoees dos mer- 
cadores & njsto Deve trabalhar por que o all nom me pare9e seruj'90 
de ds nem dellRey noso S5r nem Do capitam geerall •//. 



APPENDIX I 


LETTER OF TOME PIRES TO 
KING MANUEL 

From Cochin, 27 Ian., 15 16 1 

From Tom£ Pires, apothecary 
To the King our Lord. 

ABOUT THE DRUGS AND WHERE THEY GROW. 

Sir 

A list was received here asking for certain drugs. Order has been 
given to look for them and they will go next year. Here I will give an 
account of where each of them grows, and also of some things which 
have gone there [to Portugal]. 

Wormwood — By Cristovao de Brito and D. Aires [da Gama] a 
certain amount of wormwood was taken there which had been 
bought by Joao de Avila, while I was in Portugal. So Your High- 
ness must note that it was not sent by me. It grows in Cambay 
and in the lands of Chaul. 

Rhubarb — A certain amount of rotten rhubarb was also sent there, 
which was bought in Malacca. I had nothing to do with its 
purchase, as I was in Cannanore. It was bought for four hundred 
cruzados from Rui de Araujo and Joao Viegas. They must return 
the money to Your Highness, for they sold merchandise which 
was worth nothing here. I entered it in Rui de Araujo’s account 
for the amount paid. 

Rhubarb — From Malacca we, the officials of the factory, sent a small 
amount of it, because it did not cost money; it was given as a 
present by some Chinese. And so it was sent there, otherwise it 
would have been thrown into the sea. Rhubarb grows in Tartary 
and Turkey. 

Cassia fistola — Cassia fistola grows on the mountains which divide 
Malabar from Narsinga; it grows everywhere, but mainly in 
Anaimalai {Ana malee) and Pudaparj, fifteen leagues from 

1 The Portuguese original is extant in Lisbon, T6rre do Tombo, Corpo 
Cronoldgico, Parte i a , Mago 19, Doc. 102. 

512 



APPENDIX I 


513 

Kranganur, behind the mountain range. It grows in the 
Island of Sumatra, in the kingdom of Aru. In Java [there is] an 
enormous quantity. It is not used here. There is a lot in Turkey, 
and from there it goes to our parts. 

Incense — Incense grows in Arabia Felix, in the kingdom of Dhofar 
( Tufar ) as well as the kingdoms of the Fartaks ( Fartaqis ) and 
Madraka. It grows also (?) in Orissa, which is between Narsinga 
and Bengal. It is sold in Cambay and in Chaul, very cheap. 

Opium — Opium we call here amfiao. It grows in Thebes, a city of the 
kingdom of Cairo. It grows in Aden, in Cambay, in the kingdom 
of Cous, which is on the Bengal mainland. This is a great mer- 
chandise and it is customary to eat it in these parts — the kings 
and lords in portions as big as a hazel-nut; the lower classes eat 
less, because it is expensive. If on top of it they drink anything 
sour or stimulating, or oil, or coconut water, it kills forthwith. 
Men accustomed to eat it become drowsy and confused, their 
eyes go red, and they go out of their senses. They use it because 
it provokes them to lewdness. It is [extracted] from poppies. It is 
good merchandise, consumed in great quantity, and very valu- 
able. 

Tamarind — There are plenty of tamarinds in all the land of Malabar. 
Malabar stretches from Mangalore to Comorin. There are many 
more in Tamor and Choromandel. Tamor stretches from Caile 
(Old Kayal) to the shoals of Chilam, Choromandel from the 
shoals to Cunjmeira (Pondicherry). Java and the islands of Bima 
have an enormous quantity. It is merchandise in these parts. It 
is used instead of vinegar. It is worth very little. It is good mer- 
chandise. The island of Sunda, which is close to Java, has plenty 
of tamarinds, and they exist in quantity in many parts. 

Galangal — Galangal are roots which resemble ginger. They grow 
in Chaul and Mangalore, and in the kingdom of Indo. The 
kingdom of Indo is on the side of Cambay, on the mainland. It 
was the chief of these four kingdoms, to wit, Cambay, Rajputs, 
Dewal, and the Nodhakis. From this kingdom there runs the 
river Indo, which is called Qindj here; it debouches between the 
Rajputs and the kingdom of Dewal. It has a good town. From this 
river the Indians got their name. The Rajputs are heathens, as 
well as part of the inhabitants of Dewal and the Nodhakis; in 
Cambay there is also an enormous number of them. [Galangal] 
can be bought in Cambay. 

T 


H.C.S. II. 



TOMIi PIRES 


514 

Turpeth — Turpeth comes from Mandu, and from there it goes to 
Cambay. That from here is not very good; that from Turkey is 
better. That from here is thick and black; the good must be the 
reverse. It also grows in Portugal. The kingdom of Mandu 
borders on Cambay and the kingdom of Deccan, and in the 
hinterland on Delhi. In this kingdom of Mandu are the Amazons, 
warlike women, who now fight on horseback; those of the 
Deccan ride astride, and skirmish; but the others use a lance, and 
belong to the king of Mandu ’s guard. 

Myrobalans — Myrobalans are of five sorts. Four of them grow in 
Malabar, in Barkur, Basrur, Mangalore, places of the king of 
Narsinga, between Malabar and Bhatkal. The chebulic grows in 
Bengal, Malacca, and Borneo. Bengal borders on Orissa on one 
side and Arakan on the other. Malacca [borders] on Kedah on 
one side and Pahang on the other. Borneo are islands two hun- 
dred leagues east of Malacca. These islands have much gold, 
edible camphor and these myrobalans. The kings of Borneo are 
subject to Your Highness. All these sorts [of myrobalans] are 
merchandise in these parts. 

Aloes — Aloes grow in the island of Sokotra, in Aden, Cambay, 
Valencia de Aragon, in a town called Molvediro (Murviedro ?), 
and in other places. The most esteemed [grow] in the island of 
Sumatra (an obvious mistake for Sokotra), and next come those 
from our parts; those from Aden and Cambay are so bad that 
they are worthless. 

Spikenard — Spikenard grows in the kingdoms of Delhi and Mandu. 
It comes to Cambay. This kingdom of Delhi is the most famous 
in these parts. They say that it overcame the Nodhakis, a people 
who border on Persia as far as Bengal. It is a very famous king- 
dom. In it lies the Caucasus range. This [kingdom] fights against 
the king of Bengal, and against Mandu and Cambay. 

Esquinanthus (ginger-grass, Cymbopogum Schoenanthus Spreng.) — 
Esquinanthus or Mecca-grass {esqinamte or palha de meqa ) 
grows in Sokotra and all the three Arabias. It was not used in 
India. From the Arabs it went, via Alexandria, to our parts. As 
is well known the Arabs begin at the cape of Mecca Strait and of 
Ormuz (perhaps a mistake for Aden) and reach as far as the 
point of Ormuz. [Arabia] Petrea lies in the middle of the 
Deserta, from Mecca and upwards; Felix comes in the direc- 
tion of Ormuz. The Moors here call Arabia Felix the land which 



APPENDIX I 


515 

stretches from cape Guardafui to Aliocacer (El Qoseir?), which 
has a part called Felix. This lies between the Red Sea and 
Abyssinia, but it is called Arabia sub Egypt. We speak of this 
land in the description of the Strait of Mecca, in another place, 
because some of them are lands of the Abyssinian Prester John. 

Fetid gums — Serapin, galbanum, opopanax, stinking gums. Those 
we have here are very bad and of little value. They come from 
the Arabs of Cairo, and I believe they come via Alexandria from 
Italy, from Turkey and from Damascus, where they are both 
plentiful and good. 

Bdellium, Myrrh — Bdellium and myrrh grow in the kingdom of 
Mandu, as well as in Arabia Felix and in the kingdom of Delhi. 
They come to Cambay. Myrrh is good merchandise. Bdellium 
is not used here or in our parts; there is plenty in the 
Levant. 

Things lacking — Scammony, senna, xylobalsamum, carpobalsa- 
mum, gum-arabic, amber, lapis-lazuli, we have none here in 
India. In Arabia there is some amber; I do not think it grows 
here, but comes via Alexandria. Lapis-lazuli comes from 
Armenia to our parts. 

Mummy — Mummy is not human flesh, as is believed in our parts, 
nor, it seems to me, does such flesh dried or toasted on the sands 
possess the [properties] we believe it to have; for the true 
[mummy] is an exudation from corpses, obtained in this fashion: 
when the man dies they remove his intestines, lungs, etc., and 
throw in myrrh and aloes; then they sew up the corpse and put it 
in a sepulchre with holes. This mixture with the moisture of the 
body drips out and is collected. This liquor is called mummy. 
They do not use it here. That which goes to our parts comes from 
the Arabian deserts, via Alexandria; sometimes they pass off 
toasted camel flesh for human flesh. I do not believe that one is 
more useful than the other. 

Spodium — S podium is the roots of canes from a certain province; other 
people had other opinions. And as we have none we were ordered 
to put in its place calcined ivory. The Venetians broke into the 
corrals where the cows were kept, and burnt their bones, and in 
Italy and in our parts [they passed them off] as calcined ivory, 
because it was impossible to burn elephant tusks and sell them 
so cheaply. In the same way they sell the flesh of beasts for 
human flesh; neither of them is mummy. I do not know how 



5 16 TOM]* PIRES 

they use it, in view of the great difference there is between the 
liquid mixture and dried flesh. 

Tincal, Tragacanth, Sarcocol — Tincal, sarcocol, tragacanth 
come from the kingdom of Mandu and from Delhi. Sarcocol 
comes from Arabia Felix. These things do not exist here in any 
quantity. Of tincal there is a good deal; it is found in Cambay 
and in Chaul. 

Betel — Folio Indo is betel. The best here is from the kingdom of 
Goa. From Chaul to Cambodia, and in all the islands, even beyond 
the Moluccas, it is found in abundance. When green, it is sub- 
stantial, along with avelana lndia[e\ or areca and lime. Dry, it is 
good for nothing, for its virtue is so subtle that, when dry, it has 
neither flavour nor taste. The men of these parts can sustain 
themselves on betel three or four days without eating anything 
else. It greatly helps digestion, comforts the brain, strengthens 
the teeth, so that men here who eat it usually have all their teeth, 
without any missing, even at eighty years of age. Those who eat 
it have good breath, and if they do not eat it one day their breath 
is unbearable. It is a form of nourishment in these parts. 

Rubies — The mine for the highly coloured rubies appreciated in our 
parts is in the kingdom of Capelagua, bordering on the kingdom 
of Arakan and on Pegu, on the heathens’ mainland. This king- 
dom borders on the kingdom of Os (Hos) whence the lac and 
benzoin come to Pegu and Siam. From this kingdom of Cape- 
lamga they spread to all the other parts. In Arakan and Pegu 
are great craftsmen for polishing them. 

In Ceylon there are two qualities of rubies. The dark red are 
not much prized; the very light-coloured are of two sorts in 
Ceylon. They have knowledge among themselves which [ruby] 
happens to be manica (see Dalgado, s.v. Maneca); these are worth 
three times as much and they pay a high price for them. Am ong 
the people here every ruby has a price, but they prefer the very 
large ruby, even with stains, to the small and perfect one; and 
they prefer the balais rubies (see Dalgado, s.v.) to the red ones. 

There are in Ceylon cat’s-eyes which are much appreciated, 
and better sapphires than in Pegu. All other kinds of [precious] 
stones found in Ceylon are better than those from other parts. 

Zedoary — Zedoary, calamo aromatico ( Acorns calamus Linn.), cassia 
lignea (cinnamonum) are found in Malabar ( ?), plenty in Manga- 
lore, and in other parts cassia lignea. In Ceylon there are plants 



APPENDIX I 517 

growing among the cinnamon. It is not used here. It is also 
found in Brazil. 

Liquid Storax — I do not know what liquid storax is, nor [do I know] 
of any doctor who speaks positively of it; nor did the apotheca- 
ries, with whom I learnt, know of it. It comes from Venice to 
our parts in quantity. It is cheap. Liquid storax is a compound, 
and not what the doctors say. They say that it is made of aimed 
(? a balsam, from the Arabic almeia\ ? alisma), yeast, honey and 
oil. It seems to me that it is so. It is also made in Aden, and I 
think in the same way. It is good merchandise here, and of good 
value. 

Storax — Nor is what we call storax in our parts what the doctors 
say, for it is also a compound and not a thing that drips as gener- 
ally said. It is [prepared] in this manner: black benzoin is melted 
or softened and then well kneaded with powder of sandal and of 
a wood which is called agallochum ( aguilla ) here. This is called 
storax. This is the truth, and not otherwise. Time discovers the 
truth of things. 

Pearls (though Pires uses the word aljoufar = seed-pearls, he really 
means proper pearls) — Pearls grow in these parts: in Dahlak, 
Bahrein, Ceylon and Hainan. Dahlak is an island ten leagues to 
sea from the port of Massawa, in Abyssinia, or subject to it, 
lying in the Red Sea sixty leagues or less from its entrance. 
Bahrein lies a hundred and fifty leagues from Ormuz along the 
strait. It is an island close to Arabia. This strait is some two 
hundred and eighty leagues in length, and sixty in breadth in 
the widest part. This would not seem right to all the cosmo- 
graphers, who made these two straits much longer and wider; I 
say the truth. [Pearls] grow in Ceylon from Negombo to the 
shoals. They are generally called Caile pearls, because from 
Caile they go to fish for them there, but they are fished close to 
the coast of Ceylon. Hainan is an island between the kingdom 
of Cochin China ( Cauchi ) and China. The whitest [pearls] come 
from China; the best, from Ceylon; the roundest, from Bahrein, 
more orient and generally quite even; in Dahlak there is not 
much. Next year all we can get will be sent on. From Cochin, 
xxvij Jan. bcxvj. 

1 

C* 



5i8 


TOME PIRES 


[P.S.] Please Your Highness not to send from there to here 
any compounded medicine of any sort or condition, only tur- 
pentine, ceruse, aloes ( azinhaure ), a little scammony, olive oil 
from Portugal for the patients’ food, mastic, not much, which is 
expensive here. No other [medicines]. These can be dispensed 
with here; let such things be made by the apothecaries, surgeons 
and physicians, for they are paid for that. And it seems to me 
better that no marmalades or sugar of roses should come — these 
are eaten by the healthy, and all is wasted. All can be settled 
here, with things that exist here, and Your Highness will reduce 
the expenditure on medicines, for they are of no avail, not only 
because they come through great heat, but also because here the 
climate is different. 



APPENDIX II 


BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE MAPS 
AND PANORAMIC DRAWINGS 
CONTAINED IN THE BOOK OF 
FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 

MAPS 

(1) Map fol. 18 — The west coast of Europe, from ‘a boca do es- 
treito ’ (the mouth of the strait of Gibraltar) to frisa (Friesland), 
ImgrateRa (England), escoRfea (Scotland), IRllamda (Ireland) and 
the legendary islands J do brasill and as maidas. The scale of latitudes 
on the right-hand side is graduated from 30 to 54 0 , the 30° corre- 
sponding to Lisbon and the 45 0 to London (the difference of latitude 
is actually 12 degrees only), which shows that it is misplaced some 
9 degrees to the north. The 24 degrees in the scale of latitudes 
measure 206 mm, which correspond to the approximate map scale 
1:13,000,000 (exactly 1:12,944,970). The scale on the left-hand side is 
divided into 24 divisions, probably of 12 leagues each (Duarte Leite, O 
mats antigo mapa do Brasil , p. 234), a league therefore being equal to 
3.471 miles or 6428 metres, according to the map scale. This corres- 
ponds exactly to 17-285 leagues for the degree of latitude, or roughly 
the 17! leagues then generally adopted by the Portuguese pilots. How- 
ever, in Rodrigues’ time the Portuguese league was usually reckoned 
at 5920 metres or 1-197 miles, which made the degree equal to 
103600 metres or 55-939 miles at the rate of 17! leagues, according 
to Fontoura da Costa (La lieue marine des Portugais aux XV e et 
XVI e siecles , pp. 7-8). The divisions in the scale of leagues are 
alternatively divided in five parts. The same scale of leagues appears 
on each of the following eleven maps. This map is a copy of a pro- 
totype found with some variations in other Portuguese maps of 
the same epoch or earlier, such as the ‘Portuguese map of circa 
1471’, extant at Modena, the so-called Cantino planisphere of 1502, 
Pedro Reinel’s map of c. 1502, the Portuguese anonymous map of the 
beginning of the sixteenth century (Munich, Staatsbibliothek, cod. 
iconogr. 140, fol. 82), and others of a later date. Plate III. 

(2) Map fol. 19 — North-west coast of Africa, from boca do estreyto 
(‘mouth of the strait’ of Gibraltar) to cabo das barbas (Barbas Cape) 

519 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


520 

and caruoefro (Cape Corveiro, 2i°47' N), with the Azores, Madeira and 
Canary archipelagos. Scale of latitudes from 22 to 39 0 . Plate XXX. 

(3) Map fol. 20 — West coast of Africa from Rio de sam j° (St 
Jean River, 19 0 24' N) to sera lyoa (Sierra Leone, 8° 30' N), with the 
Cape Verde archipelago and Jlha dacemgam. Scale of latitudes from 
o to 20 0 N. Plate XXXIV. 

(4) Map fol. 21 — West coast of Africa from Rio dos palmares 
(Shebar Entrance, 7 0 24' N) to Cabo fermosro (Blubarra Point, 5 0 N). 
Scale of latitudes from o to 20° N. Plate XXXV. 

(5) Map fol. 22 — Coast of Brazil from north of Cape S. Roque 
(5 0 20' S) to River Tubarao (28° 20' S), with the islands of Trinidad 
and Martin Vaz. There are no place names on this map. The scale of 
latitudes runs from 1 to 30° S. Plate XXXVI. 

(6) Map fol. 23 — West coast of Africa from Rio Real (Rio del Rey, 
4 0 30' N) to Cabo das pallmas (Albina point, 15 0 54' S), with the 
Gulf of Guinea islands: Ilha de fernamdo po, Ilha do primgepe, Ilha de 
sam tome and Ilha dano bom. Scale of latitudes from 8° N to 1 5 0 S. 
Plate XXXVII. 

(7) Map fol. 24 — Coast of South Africa from cabo dos salltos (Tiger 
Point or Ponta da Marca, 16 0 30' S), on the western coast, to agoada 
da boa paaz (Foz Inhatumbo or Boa Paz, 24 0 52' S) on the eastern 
coast. Scale of latitudes from 16 0 to 36°. Plate XXXVIII. 

(8) Map fol. 25 — Ilha de samta Jlena (St Helena) and as Jlhas q 
achou tristam da cunha (Tristan da Cunha). Scale of latitudes from 13 
to 37 0 . Plate XXXIX. 

(9) Map fol. 26 — East coast of Africa from cabo das coremtes (Cape 
Corrientes, 24 0 S) to melimdee (Malindi, 3 0 13' S), with A Jlha de 
Sam Lourengo (Madagascar) and the Comoro Islands. Scale of 
latitudes from 2 to 30° S. Plate XI. 

(10) Map fol. 27 — North-east coast of Africa from about 3 0 S, 
the eastern part of the Red Sea, south-east coast of Arabia to about 
55 0 E, ilheos de canacanim (Palinarus Shoal or Abd-al-Kuri, 50° 40' 
E) and ilha de gacotora (Sokotra). Scale of latitudes from n° S to 
17 0 N. Plate XII. 

(n) Map fol. 28 — East and north coast of Arabia from Kuria 
Muria Islands to Jlha de baharem omde Nacem As Perllas (Bahrein 
Island where the pearls grow), Ormuz, west coast of India from Diu 
to Cape Comorin, Ceylon and the Laccadive Islands. Diu has the 
inscription: Dio 0 senhor della 1 sudito dellReyde cambaia (Diu. Its lord 
is a subject of the king of Cambay). For the several inscriptions on 
Ceylon see note p. 85. Scale of latitudes from o to 29 0 N. Plate XIV. 



APPENDIX II 


521 

(12) Map fol. 29 — Ceylon, Niquibar (Nicobar Islands) and Malacca 
Strait. There is no scale of latitudes, but the map is drawn on 
approximately the same scale as the previous ones; not only is Ceylon 
shown on the same size as on the previous map, but, for example, the 
shortest distance between Ceylon and Sumatra, 1,500 km, measures 
125 mm on the map, which corresponds to the map scale 
1:12,800,000. Plate XV. 

(13) Map fol. 30 — North-east coast of Sumatra from campar (Kam- 
par, 103° E) to Sunda Strait, Lingga and Banka islands, and north- 
west coast of Java as far as Qidaio (Sidayu, 113 0 E). This map has, 
about two-fifths of the distance between ter a de sumda and gepara, the 
following inscription: agoada de Joham lopez dalluimf elle descobriu 
daqui ate Japqra. This appears on Reinel’s map of c. 1524 as agua 
daluy , on the c. 1540 map as aguada dalaim, on Mercator’s globe of 
1541 as Agoada daluym and as aguada de sigide or agoa de sigide on 
the other maps; even Lavanha’s map still has Agoada de Sigide. Both 
names most likely correspond to the same place, Tanjong Sentigi, a 
rather conspicuous promontory where one of the western branches of 
the Chi Manuk delta debouches, with a good anchorage for small 
vessels. Joao Lopes de Alvim was a captain who served for many 
years in the East, accompanied Albuquerque in the taking of Malacca, 
and commanded one of the ships that pursued Pate Unus when he 
tried to attack that city in 1512. This voyage of Alvim, mentioned by 
Rodrigues in his map, and in which Tome Pires went as factor of the 
fleet (see Introduction ), took place from 14 March to 22 June 1513. 
Rui de Brito, Cartas , III, 93; Barros, III, v, 6. Castanheda says that 
Alvim who was ‘Capitao mor do mar’ from January of that year, went 
to Java with three (Rui de Brito and Barros say four) ships to fetch 
some cloves left there the previous year from the first Portuguese 
expedition to the Moluccas. ‘And as Joao Lopes de Alvim was there 
(in Java) he went to the port where Pateonuz had beached his junk in 
which he escaped from Jorge Botelho. Pateonuz sent him great 
presents in order that he should not bum the junk, telling him that it 
was a great honour to have it there, and offering himself as a great 
friend of the Portuguese. And Joao Lopes accepted his friendship, 
and promised him that he would not do any harm to the junk. And 
taking the cloves he had gone to fetch, he returned to Malacca . . .’ 
Ill, cxi. The scale of latitudes, from i° N to io° S, measures 170 mm, 
which corresponds to the approximate map scale 1 :8, 000, 000 (exactly 
1:7,843,100). The distance of 756 miles, or 1400 km, in straight line 
from Kampar to Sidayu, corresponds to 715 miles or 1326 km meas- 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


522 

ured on the map. The scale of leagues contains 13 main divisions, 
each corresponding to 3^909 miles or 7240 metres. Plate XVIII. 

(14) Map fol. 33 — The Bay of Bengal, with the east coast of India, 
coast of Burma, part of Ceylon, and the Andaman and Nicobar 
islands, both archipelagos under the inscription estas sam as Jlhas 
de niquibar (these are the islands of Nicobar). Besides this and the 
inscriptions on Ceylon, there is the following inscription over the 
Ganges delta: Este he 0 Rio de bemgalla (This is the river of Bengal). 
This map, as well as the twelve following, have neither scale of 
latitudes nor scale of leagues. The map scale is approximately 
1:6,000,000. Plate XVI. 

(15) Map fol. 34 — The northern part of Sumatra, with the in- 
scription Esta Jlha he a de camara Homde a muita Pimemta (This 
Island is that of Sumatra, where there is much pepper); the Malay 
Peninsula, from Peguu[.Homde ha muytos Robis Ricos (Pegu, where 
there are many rich rubies) to Amssiam, at the end of the Gulf of 
Siam. Map scale approximately 1:4,500,000. Plate XVII. 

(16) Map fol. 35 — Eastern end of Sumatra, with the inscription 
esta he a jim da Jlha de camatara (this is the end of the Island of 
Sumatra); western end of Java, with the inscription Este he o compepo 
da Jlha de Jaaoa/j 1 esta parajem se chama SSumda (This is the 
beginning of the Island of Java. And this part is called Sunda); Jlha 
de batnca (Banka); south-west of Borneo, with the erroneous in- 
scription Compepo da Jlha de maquacer (Beginning of the Island of 
Macassar) (see note p. 226). Plate XXIV. 

(17) Map fol. 36 — East and north coast of Borneo, with the in- 
scription A gramde Jlha de maquager (The great Island of Macassar). 
This mixing up of Borneo with Macassar or Celebes, though Pires 
separates them distinctly, shows how confused were the notions, held 
by the Portuguese at the time, about most of the islands of the 
archipelago. The map has Borney (the port of Brunei); Lloufam 
(probably meaning the island of Luzon, which is indeed towards the 
north — Mercator’s globe of 1541 has a small island Lozon just off the 
north coast of Borneo) as a place on the north coast of Borneo; 
tanhum Bagubaa (perhaps meaning ‘Tanjong Bagubaa’, correspond- 
ing to Bongon, Jebongon, Balambangam or Banguey, the first a town 
and port, the others islands close to the northernmost part of Borneo) 
on the north-easternmost point of the drawing; tanhumpura ( Tan - 
jompura or Tanjong Puting) on the south-east point of the drawing; 
and, close to the latter, an island Pamgan (perhaps Pires’ Pamuca, 
corresponding to Pamukan or Pamkan bay) which no doubt repre- 




PLATE XLI 


S c r Ttlw 






5) of the Central Mediterranean (p. 525) 


Rodrigues’ map (fol. 11 



PLATE XLII 



Rodrigues’ map (fol. 116) showing the Eastern Mediterranean and 

Black Sea (pp. 525-6) 



APPENDIX II 


523 

sents Pulo Laut. This map shows also the eastern end of Java, with 
the inscription a Jim dajlha dejaoa (the end of the Island of Java); 
Jlha de madura; Bllaram (Bali), Lomboquo (Lombok), and SSimbaua 
and Aramaram (Sumbawa). Plate XXVI. 

(18) Map fol. 37 — Solor and the eastern part of Flores drawn as a 
single island, Timor, Banda and Moluccas archipelagos, Amboina 
and Ceram, etc. (See note pp. 200-2). Map scale of this and the 
previous two maps approximately 1 7, 000, 000. Plate XXVII. 

(19) Map fol. 38 — Sketch of the Gulf of Tong-King, at the head 
of which is written cofhim da ghina , probably signifying to Rodrigues 
‘Cochin of China’. Hainan bounds duly the south-east part of 
the Gulf, but unnamed; however, over Lei chou peninsula is 
written 7 nam llimon , which stands for Hainan and Lin-mun. See 
note p. 120. Plate XIX. 

(20) Map fol. 39 — This map has part of a long island called Le- 
queoller (Lequeosl), opposite a stretch of coast with the inscription 
Costa que vai per a A chinaa (Coast that goes towards China); on the 
southern part of the same map there is an indefinite mass of shoals 
called Jlhas allagadas (Surfy islands), which may correspond to the 
vast archipelago of reefs and islets west of Palawan. Lequeoller and 
the unnamed smaller islands southward, seem to correspond to the 
Philippines. Plate XX. 

(21) Map fol. 40 — Sketch showing the entrance to the Canton 
River with the inscription A boca do estreito de china (the mouth of 
the strait of China), and several islands, one of which has the in- 
scription a esta Jlha ssurgem os Jumquos da china (the junks of [i.e., 
that go to] China anchor off this island), which corresponds to 
Tamao or Turnon of the early Portuguese, or present Lin Tin Island 
(see note pp. 12 1-2). Another river, debouching from the north of the 
Canton river, narrower and with large bends, has the inscription Per 
este Rio agima lleuam a mercadaria em Paros pequenos a propia gidade 
da china (Up this river they take the merchandise in small prows to 
the City of China itself). At the upper end of this river is placed A 
gidade da china (The City of China), surrounded by two square 
walls. This must represent Peking, called A Cidade da China as 
Gour, the ancient capital of Bengal, was called A Cidade de Bengala , 
and Cuttack, the historical capital of Orissa, was called A Cidade de 
Orixa (see notes pp. 90-1. The long narrow river is probably meant 
to represent the Grand Canal. On the other hand, the several canals 
or tributary streams, shown on the map, give some sort of idea of the 
basin of the Sikiang or West River. It must be remembered that 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


524 

Rodrigues drew from information he obtained perhaps in Malacca, 
and it would not be surprising if the accounts he heard were some- 
what mixed in his mind. Plate XXL 

(22) Map fol. 41 — Sketch of the north part of the Chinese coast, 
with the inscription ate aqui tem desscuberto os chims (up to here the 
Chinese have discovered), near a large island which may represent 
Korea, the insular conception of which is found in other early maps 
and accounts. Towards the south there is a long island inscribed: 
Ylha parpoquo Nesta Achares muyta coussa da chyna ( Parpoquo 
island. You will find in it many things from China). This Ylha 
Parpoquo must be the PARIOCO INSVLA that appears at the end 
of the Magnus Golf us Chinnarum Maris in Lopo Homem’s atlas of 
1519. In the Comentarios de Afonso de Albuquerque it is said that 
the gold brought by the Gores to Malacca ‘comes from an island 
which is close to theirs (the Gores); it is called Perioco, and in it 
there is much gold’. Ill, xviii. Denuce thinks that Perioco comes 
from ‘Periya Woki qui signifie le Japon’. Magellan , p. 164. Dahlgren 
has warned us against this etymology. Les debuts, p. 13. Ferrand says 
that Perioco ‘c’est Pile Fariyuk (ou Firiyuk) du ‘ Umda et du Muhit 
de SidI ‘All’, Arab manuscripts of 1462 and 1489, in which that island 
is placed south-east or south of the ports of China. But he adds: ‘Je 
n’ai pas pureussir a identifier Pile en question’. Malaka , II, 130-4. 
Parpoquo or Perioco, however, may correspond rather to Perieco, 
where live perioecians or perioeci (from the Greek ireploLKoi), those 
who dwell on the same parallel of latitude, but on opposite meridians. 
Periecos is an old Portuguese word, found for example in a seven- 
teenth-century Portuguese Tratado de Geografia, Cap. io° — ‘Dos 
Antipodos, Antecos e Periecos’, ff. 65-80, extant in the British 
Museum (MS Egerton 2063). See A. Cortesao, A Expansao Portu- 
guesa atravh do Padfico, p. 168. Though Japan is on the same 
parallel as Portugal, it is only 150° distant; but in that time longitudes 
could not be properly measured, and later maps still situated Marco 
Polo’s Chipangu (which he said lay ‘in the high seas, 1500 miles 
distant from the continent’), far away in the Pacific. As Rodrigues 
represented the Lequeos as an island, and Parpoquo as another island 
further north, it is not impossible that this Parpoquo or Perioco 
corresponds to Japan, and to the old Portuguese word Perieco, 
through a flight of imagination of some early learned Lusitanian. 
But this is a mere conjecture. It must be remembered, however, that 
the Comentarios were written upon information contained in the 
letters of Afonso de Albuquerque, who died in 1515; Rodrigues’ 



APPENDIX II 


525 


maps date from c. 1513, and Lopo Homem’s atlas, though dated 
1519, shows that its representation of the Far East was still much 
less accurate than that of Rodrigues. Then Perioco disappeared from 
maps and documents, which would not be the case if the name was a 
simple Portuguese adaptation or corruption of some native name, as 
seen in so many other instances. See note p. 1 3 1 . Plate XXII. 

(23) Map fol. 42 — Sketch of a long island, running south-north, 
with the inscription: Esta he a primpipal Jlha doss Llequeosj dizem que 
ha nella triguo 1 ohra de cobre/l. ‘This is the principal Island of the 
Lequeos. They say that there are wheat and copper articles in it’. 
Pires mentions wheat and copper among the merchandise brought 
by the Lequeos to Malacca. This island must represent Formosa, 
and the two small islands and two islets off its south-west coast 
perhaps correspond to the Pescadores Islands. See note pp. 128-9. 
Plate XXIII. 

(24) Map fol. 1 14 — Western Mediterranean. Plate XL. 

(25) Map fol. 1 15 — Central Mediterranean and Aegean Sea. Be- 
sides abundant nomenclature, as on the previous one, this map has a 
few short inscriptions: Esta he a ter a da esscaruonya (This is the land 
of Slavonia); esta he a costa de pulha (this is the coast of Puglie); 
castello de costamtinoplle (castle of Constantinople) repeated on each 
side of the Bosporus. Plate XLI. 

(26) Map fol. 1 16 — Eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea. Besides 
the abundant nomenclature this has several more or less long inscrip- 
tions. On the Crimea is written: Caffaa.j foi de yanoesses (Kaffa [or 
Feodosia]. Belonged to the Genoese). Over the Black Sea: Este 
he 0 mar Maior Homde nam navega nenhua nao de cristaos (This is 
the Major sea, where no Christian ship sails). On the Bosporus: 
costamtinoplle Per a 7 de janoesses (Constantinople. Pera belongs to 
the Genoese). East of the Bosporus: aqui embarquaram os turquos q 
tomaram costamtinopllee em huua nao de Janoesses (Here embarked the 
Turks, who took Constantinople, on a ship of the Genoese). Over 
Anatolia: Deste Rio se parte a tera do ssoldam com a do tur A tera do 
turco sse chama car mania 7 na Vos ff alio na greca que foi do emperador 
De costamtinopllee / . (This river parts the land of the Sultan [of Egypt] 
from that of the Turk. The land of the Turk is called Carmania 
[Marash Kermanig] . And I do not tell you about Greece which was of 
the emperor of Constantinople). On the Lebanon: Momtanha negra 
daqui se leuou Madeira pera fazerem as primeiras naos dos Rumes 
(Black mountain. From here wood was taken to build the first ships of 
the Rumes). At Acre: nosa sirnia\J\ do carmo samjoham do acre (Our 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


526 

Lady of Mount Carmel and St John of Acre). Porto dejafa. ha daqui 
a Jerzulem 9 llegoas (Port of Jaffa. There are 9 leagues from here to 
Jerusalem). On the Nile delta: os boqueires porto das Caracas (the em- 
bouchures, port of the caracks); por este Rio vam Ao cairo (by this 
river they go to Cairo). To the west of the Nile delta: Esta he a tera do 
ssoldam.f que sse chama Xurca (?) (This is the land of the sultan, who 
[or which] is called Xurca). These last three maps have no scale of 
latitudes nor scale of leagues and are drawn in the approximate scale 
1:6,000,000. They are copied from the more or less standardized 
contemporary prototype. Plate XLII. 

PANORAMIC DRAWINGS 

The first fourteen of these drawings (ff. 43-56) are named either 
Sollote or Solloro, and the first of them has the following inscriptions: 
Compefo Dajlha de Sollote /. em Noue graos (Beginning of the island 
of Solor. In nine degrees), and Esta ffoi a primeira terra que vimos 
quamdo vinhamos de bamdapera Mellaquaj (This was the first land we 
sighted when we came from Banda to Malacca). There follow 27 
drawings (ff. 57-83) of the north coast of the Ilha de samademga. The 
first of these has the following inscription: Cabo das ff roles na Ilha de 
samademga /. & esta em oito graos (Cape of Flores in the island of 
Samademga. And it is in eight degrees); the second has at the top the 
continuation of Samademga , and at the bottom, drawn upside-down, 
the Ylha Nusaramgeti ; the fifth, the sixth and the seventh have in the 
foreground the Ilha de nupaRaja, with Samademga in the background; 
the fifteenth has Cabo do ffero\ the last of all has Cabo da Jlha de 
samademga , and then follows the strait of Sapeh and the beginning of 
Sumbawa, all on the same sheet. As far as it is possible to judge, the 
first of the drawings named Sollote or Solloro seems to refer to Alor 
Island, east of the Solor group; the second has the western point of 
Alor, and the eastern point of Pantar, with the strait distinguishable 
between them; the twelve other drawings show Pantar, Lomblen and 
Adunare. The Samademga set of drawings corresponds to Flores 
Island; Cabo das ffroles is Flores Head or Tanjong Kopondai, called 
Tamjambao in the rutter of the Livro de Marinharia (p. 266); Ylha 
Nusaramgeti , called Nucaratete in the rutter, is Rusa Linguette or 
Sukur Island; Ilha de nupaRaja, called Nucarraya in the rutter, is 
Paloe or Raja Island (Nusa means island in Java-Malay); Cabo do 
ffero — ‘the negroes call this cape Tamjambis, which means cabo do 
ferro (Iron cape)’ according to the rutter — corresponds to Toro Besi 



APPENDIX II 527 

or Tanjong Besi, the northernmost point of western Flores. Plates 
V, VIII, IX and X. 

The three drawings (ff. 83-85) of the north coast of Sumbawa, are 
all named Simbaua or Symbaua. The first has the western end of 
Flores island, with the inscription — Cabo da Jlha de Samademga 
(Flores), and then, separated by a channel, the eastern end of Sum- 
bawa with the inscription — Comefo da Jlha de Simbaua’, a few houses 
and trees mark the porto de f ape (Sapeh), and off the north-east point 
of Sumbawa is the eastern part of the Ylha do ffogo (Gunong Api or 
Sangeang island). The second shows the middle and western part of 
the Ylha do ffogo, having Symbaua in the background, with the ilha 
de aram aram and the eastern half of the island of moio. The third 
has the western half of moio and Symbaua, as far as Telok Sumbawa. 
Plate XXV. 

In a communication I presented in 1938 to the International Con- 
gress of Geography in Amsterdam — The first account of the Far East 
in the sixteenth century — I reproduced the second of these drawings 
(f. 84), erroneously stating that ‘the Ylha do ffogo seen on the left 
corresponds to the mountainous peninsula dominated by the Tam- 
bora volcano (3,082 m). The ilha aram aram must be one of the islands 
in Saleh Bay, and the unnamed islet is, perhaps, Satonda’ ( Comptes 
Rendus, Tome II, Section IV, p. 149). I repeated the mistake in my 
essay O Descobrimento da Australasia e a * Questao das Molucas\ pub- 
lished in 1939. The disposition and proportions of the drawing, in 
which the distance between an enormous Ylha do ffogo and moio 
appears telescoped into less than the length of Moyo itself; the fact 
that the ilha aram aram is shown rather flat; the fact that the two 
smaller but conspicuous craters, beside the higher volcano, correspond 
fairly well with the drawing of the Ylha do ffogo; and the fact that 
though Sangeang island has three active craters visible, the highest 
(6335 feet or 1931 m) is situated in the north and the other (5890 
feet or 1795 m) is in the south of the island, contrary to what is shown 
in the drawing, led to my mistake. But when I recently studied the 
rutter in the Livro de Marinharia, I came across a passage stating that 
after the island of Moyo lies the Ilheo da ara; ‘from this ilheo de Arraa 
ana to the mountain of Arraa ana, which is on the coast of Qimbaua, 
may be in my opinion one league or more; this islet is high’, etc. 
(p. 265). The Ilheo da ara or Ilheo de Arraa and is Satonda; the 
mountain of Arraa ana is the peninsula dominated by Tambora 
volcano. It is easy to understand how Rodrigues, drawing from the 
sea, represented Aram aram as an island; but it is not so easy to ex- 



FRANCISCO RODRIGUES 


528 

plain why he drew it as a flat land, while the relative positions of 
Moyo, Satonda, Aram aram and Saleh Bay are accurate enough. 

The seven drawings on ff. 87-93 are called amjane , which corres- 
ponds to Lombok. See note p. 201. It seems, however, that the first 
three represent the western part of Sumbawa, Rodrigues thinking 
that Telok Sumbawa, the bay on which is the village of Sumbawa, 
and the plain extending in a westerly direction, followed by a particu- 
larly hilly land, were a strait between the two islands, as becomes 
apparent from the sketches. Bali is represented in the drawing on 
f. 93 together with the western end of Lombok. The fact that 
Rodrigues’ ship, after reaching Lombok, sailed north-north-west 
in order to pass north of Sapudi, must account for Bali being 
drawn as a small island, as he saw only its north-eastern end. 

The next two drawings (ff. 94, 95) show Sapudi Island ( pude ), with 
the small island of Raas ( Jlha de Raz ) where the Sabaia of Francisco 
Serrao was shipwrecked. The last 17 drawings (ff. 96-112) are called 
Jlha dejaooa or simply Jaooa, from its eastern end — Compego da Jlha 
de Jaoa (Beginning of the Island of Java), to the region of Cape 
Krawang, which bears the inscription E ate aqui descobrimos da Jlha 
dejaoa (And up to here we discovered the Island of Java). Along 
the coast there are the following names: Srubaia (Surabaya), Agragj 
(Grisee), Rio de fidaio (River of Sidayu), Tubam (Tuban), Cabo 
Amballor (Tanjong Api Api Anom), Mamdalliqua (Mandelika), 
Japara porto depate Unuz (Japara port of Pate Unus ). 



APPENDIX III 


LIST OF EARLY MAPS QUOTED 

1351 — Medici sea atlas. Anonymous. Biblioteca Laurenziana, Flo- 
rence. 

1 375— 1 38 1 — Catalan map of the world, by Abraham Cresques and his 
son Jafuda Cresques. Gonzalo de Reparaz, the younger, has 
shown that this map was finished at a date later than 1375, 
perhaps in 1381. Catalunya a les mares, pp.82-93. Bibliotheque 
Nationale, Paris. 

1457-1459 — Map of the world, by Fra Mauro. The original, made 
by order of King Afonso V of Portugal, is lost. A copy finished 
in 1460 is extant in Venice. A. Cortesao, Cartografia, 1 , 12 1-5. 

‘c. 1471’ — Map of the coasts of S.W. Europe and N.W. Africa with 
the Atlantic islands. Biblioteca Estense, Modena. Reproduced in 
facsimile with a memoir by A. Fontoura da Costa under the title 
A Portuguese Nautical Chart, Anonymous, of 'circa' 1471, Lisbon 
1939. Flores island, in the Azores, is called ilia das{!) flors; the 
legendary May da island is named ilia da nay da; Lisbon is given 
as lixbona. No Portuguese cartographer would write ilia or 
lixhona. The maker of this map was probably from the Mediter- 
ranean, perhaps a Majorcan. There is no more ground for 
stating that this map is Portuguese than there is for any other 
map of the same period made by foreign cartographers from 
Portuguese prototypes. 

1502 — Anonymous Portuguese map of the world. Biblioteca Estense, 
Modena. This famous map was secretly bought in Lisbon by an 
agent of the Duke of Ferrara, called Alberto Cantino, whence 
the rather inappropriate name of ‘Cantino map’, by which it is 
usually known. Cartografia, 1 , 142-15 1. 

c. 1502 — Map of the North Atlantic, West Europe and N.W. Africa, 
by Pedro Reinel. Staatsbibliothek, Munich. Cartografia, I, 
260-1. 

c. 1510 — Anonymous Portuguese map of South Africa, Red Sea, 
Persian Gulf and Indian Ocean. Staatsbibliothek, Wolfen- 
biittel. Richard Uhden dates this map 1509. The Oldest Portu- 
guese Original Chart of the Indian Ocean, a.d. 1509, in Imago 

u 529 H.C.S. II 



530 


MAPS 


Mundi, III, London 1939. It could hardly have been made 
before 1510, and it is better dated c. 1510, as is done by Heinrich 
Winter, Der deutsche Besitz an portugiesischen Karten der Ent- 
deckungszeit, in Forschungen und Fortschritte, Berlin, May 1939* 

c. 1517 — Map of South Africa, Red Sea, Persian Gulf, India, Ma- 
laysia and Indian Ocean, by Pedro Reinel. Armeebibliothek, 
Munich. A. Cortesao, Cartografia, I, 270-2; A Hitherto Unrecog- 
nized Map by Pedro Reinel in the British Museum, in The Geo- 
graphical Journal, June 1936. 

c. 1518 — Map similar to the above, by Pedro Reinel. British Mu- 
seum. Ibidem. 

c. 1519 — Map of the world, by Jorge Reinel. ArmeebibliotheK, 
Munich. Cartografia, 1 , 272-8. 

1519 — Atlas with N.W. Europe, Azores, Brazil, Indian Ocean and 
Malaysia. Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris. This atlas, and a 
loose map of the Atlantic, constitute the so-called ‘Miller 
maps’, the authorship of which has been attributed to Pedro 
Reinel by Denuce, Kammerer and myself ( Cartografia , I, 278- 
298). However, Marcel Destombes, a young French scholar and 
expert in the history of cartography, has demonstrated that the 
author of the ‘Atlas Miller’ is Lopo Homem. A series of contro- 
versial articles on the subject appeared recently in The Geogra- 
phical Journal: M. Destombes, Lopo Homem' s Atlas of 1519, 
November 1937; G. Caraci, Lopo Homem and the Atlas Miller, 
and answer by M. Destombes, March 1938; F. A. Kammerer, 
The Lopo Homem Map once more, May 1938; La Mappemonde 
Lopo Homem et 1 ' Atlas Miller, December 1939. 

1522 — Map of the North Indian Ocean and Malaysia, by Nuno 
Garcia de Torreno. Biblioteca del Re, Turin. Alberto Magnaghi, 
La prima rappresentazione delle Filippine e delle Molucche. 
Milano 1927. 

c. 1523-4 — Anonymous map of the world. Biblioteca del Re, Turin. 
Alberto Magnaghi, II Planisfero del 1523 della Biblioteca del Re 
in Torino, Firenze 1929; A. Cortesao, Cartografia, I, 182-6. 

c. 1524 — Map showing the southern hemisphere in equidistant polar 
projection. This early Portuguese map was discovered by my 
friend Commandant Marcel Destombes in the Top Kapu 
Sarayi, Istambul, in 1935. He ascribes its authorship to Pedro 
Reinel and dates it 1 524. I feel more inclined to think that the 
map was drawn by Jorge Reinel, Pedro’s son. Marcel Destombes, 



APPENDIX III 


53 * 

& Hemisphere Austral en 1524. Une Carte de Pedro Reinel a 
Istambul. In Comptes Rendus du Congres International de Gio- 
graphie. Amsterdam 1938. Tome II, Section IV, pp. 175-184. 
Leiden 1939. 

1527 — Map of the world, by Diogo Ribeiro. Landesbibliothek, 
Weimar. Cartografia , II, 14 1-5. 

1529 — Map of the world, by Diogo Ribeiro. Propaganda Fide, Roma. 
Cartografia, II, 145-15 1. 

1529 — Map of the world, by Diogo Ribeiro. Landesbibliothek, 
Weimar. Cartografia, II, 152-167. 

c. 1540 — Anonymous Portuguese map of the Central Indian Ocean, 
Persian Gulf, India, Malaysia and South China Sea. Staatsbiblio- 
thek, Wolfenbiittel. Published for the first time by A. Cortesao, 
A Expansao Portuguesa atraves do Pacifico. 

c. 1540-50 — Anonymous Portuguese map of Malaysia and South 
China Sea. The so-called ‘Penrose map’. Though its owner, Mr. 
Boies Penrose (U.S.A.), says that ‘it is clearly of Spanish and 
not Portuguese manufacture’ and that it was made c. 1522, the 
date of this unfinished, undated and quite unmistakably Portu- 
guese map cannot be safely placed much before the middle of 
the sixteenth century. Cartografia, 1 , 159. 

1554 — Map of the world by Lopo Homem. Museo di Strumenti 
Antichi, Florence. Cartografia I, 346-8. 

1558 — Atlas of the world, by Diogo Homem. British Museum. Carto- 
grafia, I, 373-5. 

1563 — Atlas of the world, by Lazaro Luis. Biblioteca da Academia 
das Ciencias, Lisbon. Cartografia, II, 243-251. 

1568 — Atlas of the world, by Diogo Homem. Staatsbibliothek, 
Dresden. Cartografia, I, 379-380. 

1568 (?) — Atlas of the world, by Fernao Vaz Dourado. Biblioteca 
Nacional, Lisbon. Cartografia, II, 68-77. 

1568 — Atlas of the world, by Fernao Vaz Dourado. Duke of Alba, 
Madrid. Cartografia, II, 28-41. 

I 57 ° — Atlas of the world, by Fernao Vaz Dourado. Huntington 
Library, San Marino (Calfornia). Cartografia, II, 60-4. 

1571 — Atlas of the world, by Fernao Vaz Dourado. Torre do Tombo, 
Lisbon. Cartografia , II, 41-54. 



MAPS 


532 

1573 (?) — Atlas of the world, by Fernao Vaz Dourado. British 
Museum. Cartografia, II, 64-8. 

1580 — Atlas of the world, by Fernao Vaz Dourado. Staatsbibliothek, 
Munich. Cartografia , II, 55-9. 

1615-23 — Anonymous Portuguese atlas of the world, so-called de la 
Duchesse de Berry’. Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris. Cartografia, 
II, 86-95. 

1635 — Nine maps with Africa, from the Cape of Good Hope, Red 
Sea, Persian Gulf, India, Malaysia and China Sea, by Pedro 
Berthelot. In Livro do Estado da India, MS. Sloane 197, British 
Museum. Berthelot was a Norman, born at Honfleur in Dec. 
1600. He embarked for the Far East in 1619 and entered the 
Portuguese service perhaps in 1626 in Malacca. Later he went to 
Goa and was appointed Pilot and Cosmographer-major of India. 
Due to the influence of his countryman Father F. Philippe, in 
Goa, he became a Carmelite under the name of P. Denis de la 
Nativite. In 1638 he was sent to Achin, in Sumatra, with a Por- 
tuguese embassy, and was murdered with four Portuguese by 
the natives. Charles Breard, Histoire de Pierre Berthelot, Pilot et 
Cosmographe du Roi de Portugal aux Indes Orientales, Carme di- 
chausse. Paris 1889. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 


Abendanon, E. C. Sur la signification du nom de Vile Celebes. In La 
Geographic , vol. xxxvn, No. 4. Paris, Avril 1922. 

Afonso, Mestre. Ytinerario da viagem que fez da Imdia por terra a 
estes Reinos de Portugal. Edited by A. Baiao. Coimbra, 1923 . 
Albuquerque, (Braz) Afonso de. Commentaries de Afonso Dal- 
boquerque. 4 pt. Lisboa, 1557. Translated and edited by W. de 
Gray Birch. Hakluyt Society, 1875-83. 

Albuquerque, Afonsode. Cartas de Afonso de Albuquerque. Edited 
by the Academia das CiSncias de Lisboa. 7 vols. 1884-1935. 
Alguns Documentos do Archivo Nacional da Torre do Tombo 
acerca das navegapdes e conquistas portuguezas. Edited by Jos6 
Ramos-Coelho. Lisboa, 1892. 

Andrada, Francisco de. Chronica do muyto alto e muyto poderoso 
Rey destes Reynos de Portugal Dom Joao 0 III deste nome. 4 pt. 
Lisboa, 1613. 

Axelson, Eric. South-East Africa 1488-1530. London, 1940. 
Ayres, Christovam. Femao Mendes Pinto, Subsidios para a sua 
biographia e para 0 estudo da sua obra. Lisboa, 1904. 

Femao Mendes Pinto e ojapao. Lisboa, 1906. 

Azevedo, J. Lucio de. ftpocas de Portugal Economico. Lisboa, 1929. 
Baiao, Antonio. Itinerarios da India a Portugal por terra. (Antonio 
Tenreiro e Mestre Afonso). Coimbra, 1923. 

Balfour, E. The Cyclopaedia of India. 3rd ed. London, 1885. 
Barbosa, Duarte. Livro. Lisboa, 1821. See Dames. 

Barros, Joao de. Asia. Decadas I-IV. Lisboa, 1552, 1553, 1563; 
Madrid, 1615. 

Birch, Walter de Gr a Albuquerque (Braz) Afonso de. 

Blake, John William. Europeans in West Africa, 1450-1560. 
Hakluyt Society, 1942. 

Bluteau, D. Rafael. Vocabulario Portuguez e Latino. 10 vols. 
Lisboa, 1712-28. 

Bocarro, Ant6nio. Decada 13 da Historia da India (First half of the 
seventeenth century). Lisboa, 1876. 

Botelho, Simao. Tombo do Estado da India. 1554. In Collecpao de 
Monumentos Ineditos, tomo v. Lisboa, 1868. 

Bowrey, Thomas. A Geographical Account of Countries Round the 
Bay of Bengal, 1669 to 1679. Edited by Sir R. C. Temple, Bart. 
Hakluyt Society, 1903. 

Bowring, Sir John. The Kingdom and People of Siam. 2 vols. 
London, 1857. 

Boxer, Charles Ralph. Subsidios para a Historia dos Portugueses no 
Japao (1542-1647). In Boletim da Agenda Geral das Colonias, Nos. 
23-32. Lisboa, 1927-8. 

Some aspects of Portuguese influence in Japan, 1542-1640. In The 

Transactions of the Japan Society, vol. xxxm. London, 1936. 

533 



534 BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Boxer, Charles Ralph: Notes on Early European Military Influence 
in Japan. In The Transactions of the Japan Society , vol. XXXIII. 
London, 1936. 

Macao, Three Hundred Years Ago. In T'ien Hsia Monthly, vol. VI, 

No. 4. Shanghai, 1938. 

Braga, Jack M. The ‘ Tamao ' of the Portuguese Pioneers. In T’ien 
Hsia Monthly, vol. vm, No. 5. Shanghai, May, 1939. 

Brandao, Joao. Tratado da majestade, grandeza e abastanpa de Lis- 
boa, na 2 a metade do seculo XVI. ( Estatistica de Lisboa de 1552). 
Edited by Anselmo Braamcamp Freire and Gomes de Brito. 
Lisboa, 1923. 

Bruce, John. Annals of the Honorable East-India Company, 3 vols. 
London, 1810. 

Burkill, I. H. A Dictionary of the Economic Products of the Malay 
Peninsula. 2 vols. London, 1935. 

Burnell, A. C. See Yule. 

CamSes, Luis de. Os Lusiadas. Lisboa, 1572. 

Campbell, Donald Maclaine. Java: Past & Present. London, 

1915- 

Campos, J. J. A. History of the Portuguese in Bengal. Calcutta, 1919. 

Early Portuguese Accounts of Thailand. Reprint from The Journal 

of The Thailand Research Society, vol. xxxii, Parti . 1940. 

Cartas. See Albuquerque, Afonso de. 

Castanheda, Fernao Lopes de. Historia do descobrimento Gf con- 
quista da India pelos Portugueses. Livro I, Coimbra, 1551; Livros 
II, III, 1552; Livros IV, V, VI, VII, 1554. Livro VIII, 1561; Livro 
IX, The Hague, 1929 and Coimbra, 1933. 

Castilho, Julio de. Lisboa Antiga. 13 vols. Lisboa, 1879-1904. 
Castro, D. Joao de. Primeiro Roteiro da Costa da India; desde Goa 
ate Dio (1538-9)- Edited by Diogo Kopke. Porto, 1843. 

Roteiro em que se contem a viagem que fizeram os Portuguezes no 

anno de 1541, partindo da nobre cidade de Goa atee Soez, que he 
no fim, e stremidade do Mar Roxo. Edited by Antonio Nunes de 
Carvalho. Paris, 1833. 

Chang, T ’ien-tse. Sino-Portuguese Trade from 1514 to 1644. 
Leyden, 1934. 

Chassigneux, Edmond. Rica de Oro et Rica de Plata, in T’oung 
Pao, vol. xxx. Leide, 1933. 

Chung kuo ku chin ti ming ta tz’u tien (General Dictionary of the 
ancient and modem PlaceNames of China). Shanghai, 1931. 
ComentArios, See Albuquerque. 

Cordier, Henri. L’arrivee des Portugais en Chine. In T’oung Pao, 
vol. xii. Leide, 1911. See Yule. 

Corner, E. J. H. Wayside Trees of Malaya. 2 vols. Singapore, 1940. 
Correa, Francisco Antonio. Historia Economica de Portugal. 2 
vols. Lisboa, 1929. 

Correia, Gaspar. Lendas da India (Middle sixteenth century). 

4 vols. Lisboa, 1858-60. 

Cortesao, AntonioAugusto. Subsidios para um Dicciondrio Com- 
pleto ( Histdrico-Etymoldgico ) da Lingua Portuguesa. Coimbra, 1900. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 535 

Cortesao, Armando. Cartografia e Cartografos Portugueses dos 
Seculos XV e XVI. 2 vols. Lisboa, 1935 . 

The first account of the Far East in the sixteenth century — The 

name 'Japan* in 1513. In Comptes Rendus du Congres International 
de Geographie. Amsterdam 1938. Tome 11, Section iv, pp. 146-52. 
Leiden, 1939. 

O Descobrimento da Australasia e a ‘ Questao das Molucas ’, in 

Histdria da Expansao Portuguesa no Mundo, vol. 11, pp. 129—50. 

A Expansao Portuguesa atraves do Pacifico ( Australasia , Macau, 

Japao), Ibidem, pp. 151-73. Lisboa, 1939. 

A ‘ Cidade de Bengala ’ do Seculo XVI, and Os Portugueses em 

Bengala. In Boletim da Sociedade de Geografia de Lisboa, July- 
October, 1944. 

The ‘ City of Bengal ’ in Early Reports. In Journal of the Royal 

Asiatic Society of Bengal, vol. xi, Letters No. 1. Calcutta, 1945. 

Primeira Embaixada Europeia a China. O Boticario e Embaixador 

Tome Pires e a sua ‘ Suma Oriental .’ Lisboa, 1945. 

(In collaboration with Henry Thomas): The Discovery of Abys- 
sinia by the Portuguese in 1520. London, 1938; Carta das Novas 
que Vieram a El Rei Nosso Senhor do Descobrimento do Preste 
Joao. ( Lisboa , 1521). Lisboa, 1938. 

Costa, A. Fontoura da. Deambulations of the Rhinoceros ( Ganda ) 
of Muzafar, King of Cambaia,from 1514 to 1516. Lisboa, 1937. 

A Intrigante penultima pagina do ‘ Regimento de Munich ’. In 

Anais do Club Militar Naval. Lisboa, 1937. 

La lieue marine des Portugais aux XV e et XV I e siecles. In Comptes 

Rendus du Congres International de Geographie Amsterdam 1938. 
Tome 11, pp. 3-12. Leiden, 1938. 

Coutinho, D. Antonio Pereira. A Flora de Portugal. Lisboa, 

1913* 

Couto, Diogodo. Asia. Decadas IV -XII. Lisboa, 1602, 1612, 1614, 
1616, 1645, 1673, 1736. 

Crawfurd, John. History of the Indian Archipelago. 3 vols. Edin- 
burgh, 1849. 

A Descriptive Dictionary of the Indian Islands & Adjacent 

Countries. London, 1856. 

Crooke, William. See Yule. 

Cunningham, Alexander. The Ancient Geography of India. 
London, 1871. 

Dahlgren, E.W. Les debuts de la Cartographic du Japan. In Archives 
D' Etudes. vol. iv. Upsala, 191 1 . 

Dalgado, Sebastiao Rodolfo. Glossario Luso-Asiatico, 2 vols. 
Coimbra, 1919, 1921. 

Dames, Mansel Longworth. The Book of Duarte Barbosa, 2 vols. 
Hakluyt Society, 1918, 1921. 

Danvers, F. C. The Portuguese in India, 2 vols. London, 1894. 

Dennys, N. B. A Descriptive Dictionary of British Malaya. London, 
1894. 

Denuce, Jean. Les lies Lequios ( Formose et Liu-Kiu ) et Ophir. In 
Bulletin de la Societe Royale Beige de Geographie, xxxi. 1907. 



536 BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Denuce, Jean. Les origines de la cartographic portugaise et les cartes 

des Reinel. Gand, 1908. _ . 

Magellan. La question des Moluques et la premiere circumnavigation 

du globe. Bruxelles, 191 1 . 

Pigafetta. Relation du premier voyage autour du monde par Ma- 
gellan. 1519-22. Anvers, 1923. 

D’Rozario. A Dictionary of the principal languages spoken in the 
Bengal Presidency , viz. English, Bangali , and Hindustani. Calcutta, 
1837. 

Elliot, Sir H. M. and John Dowson. The History of India, as 
told by its own Historians, vols, i-vi. London, 1867-75 . 

Encyclopaedia Britannica, The. 1929 edition. 

Encyclopaedia of Islam, The. Leyden — London, 1913-38. 

Eredia, Emanuel Godinho de. Declarapam de Malaca e India 
Meridional com o Cathay. 1613. Edited from MS, with French 
version by Leon Janssen. Bruxelles, 1882. 

Ferguson, Donald. Letters from Portuguese Captives in Canton, 
Written in 1534 and 1536. (Reprinted from the Indian Antiquary.) 
Bombay, 1902. 

The Discovery of Ceylon by the Portuguese in 1506. In Journal of 

the Royal Asiatic Society, Ceylon Branch, vol. xix, pp. 284-400. 
Colombo, 1908. 

History of Ceylon from the earliest times to 1600 A.D. as related 

by Joao de Barr os and Diogo do Couto. Reprinted from Journal No. 
60, vol. xx, 1908, of the Royal Asiatic Society, Ceylon Branch. 
Colombo, 1909. 

Ferrand, Gabriel. Relations de voyages et textes geographiques 
arabes, persons et turks relatifs a V Extreme-Orient du VIII e au 
XVIII e siecles. 2 tomes. Paris, 1913-14. 

Malaka, le Malayu et Malayur. In Journal Asiatique, Onzi&me 

Serie, Tomes xi etxn. Paris, 1918. 

Les Poids, Mesures et Monnaies des Mers du Sud aux XV I e et 

XVII e Siecles. Paris, 1921. 

Ficalho, Conde de. Coloquios dos simples e drogas da India por 
Garcia da Orta, 2 vols. Lisboa, 1891-2. 

Fournereau, Lucien. Le Siam Ancien. In Annales du Musee 
Guimet. Paris, 1895. 

Freitas, Jordao A. de. O 2 0 Visconde de Santarem e os seus Atlas 
Geogrdficos. Lisboa, 1909. 

Fernao Mendes Pinto. In Historia da Literatura Portuguesa Ilus - 

trada, vol. in, pp. 53-64. Lisboa, 1932. 

Galvao, Antonio. Tratado . . . dos diversos & desuayrados caminhos, 
por donde ... a pimenta & especearea veyo da India . . . & assi de 
todos os descobrimentos antigos & modemos, que sao feitos ate a era 
de mil & quinhentos & cincoenta. [Lisboa] 1563. 

Hakluyt Society edition by Admiral C. R. D. Bethune. London, 

1862. 

Gandar, Dominique. Le Canal Imperial. In V arietes Sinologiques, 
No. 4. Shanghai, 1894. 

Gazetteer of India, The Imperial. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 537 

Gerini, G. E. Historical Retrospect ofjunkceylon Island. Reprint from 
the journal of the Siam Society. Bangkok, 1905. 

Giles, Herbert A. A Chinese-English Dictionary. (2nd edition.) 
London, 1912. 

Gois, Damiaode. Chronica do Felicissimo Rei Dom Emanuel. Partes 
Primeira & Segunda, Lisboa 1566; Partes Terceira & Quarta, 1567. 

Gray, Albert. The Voyage of Francois Pyrard of Laval to the East 
Indies , the Maldives, the Moluccas and Brazil. 3 vols. Hakluyt 
Society, 1887, 1888, 1890. 

Groeneveldt, W. P. Notes on the Malay Archipelago and Malacca , 
compiled from Chinese sources . Batavia, 1877. 

Guerre 1 ro, Fernao. Relafao Anual das Coisas que fizeram os 
Padres da Companhia de Jesus ... 5 vols. Evora, 1603; Lisboa, 
1605, 1607, 1609, 1611. 

Halde, J ean Baptist du. Description de VEmpire de Chine. 4 tomes. 
Paris, 1735. 

Hamy, E. T. L' oeuvre geographique des Reinel et la decouverte des 
Moluques (Memoire presente h la Section de geographic du Comi- 
te des travaux historiques le 7 fevrier 1891 et imp rime au Bulletin 
de geographic historique et descriptive cette meme annee (p. 117- 
49)). In Etudes Historiques et Geographiques . Paris, 1896. 

Hobson-J obson. See Yule. 

Indian Antiquary, The. Bombay. 

Iyer, L. K. Anantha Krishna. The Cochin Tribes and Castes. 2 
vols. Madras, 1909, 1912. 

Lagoa, Visconde de. Fernao de Magalha.es (A sua vida e a sua 
viagem). Lisboa, 1938. 

Grandes e Humildes na Epopeia Portuguesa do Oriente ( Seculos XV, 

XVI, e XVII). vol. 1. Lisboa, 1942. 

Laval, Franqois Pyrard of. See Gray, Albert. 

Leite, Duarte. O mais antigo mapa do Brasil. In Historia da 
Colonizafdo Portuguesa do Brasil, vol. 11, pp. 221-81. Pdrto, 
1923. 

Lembranqas de Cousas da India em 1525. In Collecfao de Monu- 
mentos Ineditos, tomo v. Lisboa, 1868. 

Leyden, John. The Sajarah Malayu: Malay Annals. London, 
1821. 

Linschoten. The Voyage of John Huyghen van-Linschoten to the East 
Indies. 2 vols. By A. C. Burnell and P. A. Tiele. Hakluyt Society, 
1884. 

LivrodeMarinharia. Sixteenth century codex, edited by Jacinto 
Ignacio de Brito Rebello. Lisboa, 1903 . 

Lobo,A.deSousaSilvaCosta. Historia da Sociedade em Portugal 
no Seculo XV. Lisboa, 1903. 

Loeb.EdwinM. Sumatra : Its History and People. Wien, 1935. 

Lopes, David. Historia dos Portugueses no Malabar [1498-1583] P° 
Zinadim. Lisboa, 1898. 

Luiz, D. Francisco deS. See Saraiva, Cardeal. 

Mac Leod, N. Atlas behoorende bij De Ooost-Indische Compagnieals 
Zeemogendheid in Azie. Rijswijk. 



538 bibliography 

Machado, Diogo Barbosa. Bibliotheca Lusitana. 4 vols. Lisboa, 

I74L 1747, 1752, 1759- . , . . „ . 

Madrolle, Claude. Hai-nan et la cdte continentale voisine. raris, 

1900. 

Mccrindle, J. W. Ancient India as described by Megasthenes and 
Arrian. Calcutta, 1926. 

Major, Richard Henry. Introduction to The History of the Great 
and Mighty Kingdom of China and the Situation Thereof . Compiled 
by the Padre Juan Gonzalez de Mendoza. Hakluyt Society, 1853. 

Marsden, William. The History of Sumatra. 3rd. ed. London, 1811. 
(isted. 1783). 

A Dictionary of the Malayan Language , etc. London, 1812. 

Mills, J. V Malaya in the Wu-Pei-Chih Charts. In Journal of the 
Malayan Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, vol. xv, Part m. 
Singapore, December 1937. 

Mosto, Andrea da. II Primo Viaggio Intorno al Globo di Antonio 
Pigafetta e le sue Regole sull' Arte del Navigare. In Raccolta Colom- 
biana, parte v, vol. hi. Roma, 1894. 

Moule, A. C. Hang-chou to Shang-tu A.D. 1276. In T’oung Pao, vol. 
xvi, pp. 391-419. Leide, 1915. 

A note on the Chinese Atlas in the Magliabecchian Library. 

In The Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, pp. 393-5. London, 
1919. 

Some Foreign Birds and Beasts in Chinese Books. In The Journal of 

the Royal Asiatic Society, pp. 247-61 . London, 1925 . 

Nunes, Ant6nio. O lyvro dos pesos da Ymdia, e assy medidas e 
mohedas. Escripto em 1554 por Amtonio Nunez. In Collecpao de 
Monumentos Ineditos, tomo v. Lisboa, 1868. 

Orta, Garcia d’. Coloquios dos simples e drogas e cousas medipinais da 
India . . . Goa, 1563. Second edition by Conde de Ficalho. Lisboa, 
1872. English translation by Sir Clements Markham. London, 
I 9 I 3- 

Osorio, D. Jeronymo. De Rebus Emmanuelis Regis Lusitaniae In- 
victissimi Virtute et Auspicio Gestis Libri Duodecim. Olysippone, 
I57 1 - 

Parker, E. H. The Island of Sumatra. In The Imperial Asiatic Quar- 
terly Review, No. 17, pp. 127-44. Woking, 1900. 

Pelliot, Paul. Un ouvrage sur les premiers temps de Macao. In 
T’oung Pao, vol. xxxi. Leide, 1935. 

Pereira, Francisco Maria Esteves. .SeePoLO. 

Phillips, George. The Seaports of India and Ceylon, described by 
Chinese voyagers of the fifteenth century, together with an account of 
Chinese navigation. In Journal of China Branch of the Royal Asiatic 
Society for the year 1885. Vol. xx, pp. 207-26; vol. xxi, pp. 30-42. 
Shanghai, 1886. 

Pieris, P. E. Ceylon: The Portuguese Era, Being a History for the Period 
i 5°5-i658. 2 vols. Colombo, 1913, 1914. 

Pinto, Fernao MENDES.Peregmwifam. Lisboa, 1614. 

Playfair, G. M. H. The Cities and Towns of China. 2nd ed. Shang- 
hai, 1910. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 


539 

Polo, Marco. O Livro de Marco Paulo. Second Edition by F. M. 
Esteves Pereira. Lisboa, 1922 (1st ed. Lisboa, 1502). See Yule. 

Raffles, Sir Thomas Stamford. The History of Java. 2 vols. Sec. 
ed. London, 1830. 

Ramusio, Giovanni Battista. Primo Volume delle Navigationi 
et Viaggi nel qual si contiene la descrittione dell' Africa e del Paese 
del Prete Ianni, con varii viaggi , del Mar Rosso a Calicut, et infin 
all' Isole Molucche . . .et la Navigatione attorno il Mondo. Venetia, 
I 5 SO. 

Remusat, Abel. Nouveaux Melanges Asiatiques. 2 vols. Paris, 
1829. 

Resende, Garcia de. Livro das Obras . . . Miscellanea e trouas . . . 
Evora, 1554. 

Resende, Pedro Barreto de. Livro do Estado da India. (1634-46). 
MS Sloane 197. British Museum. 

Ricci, P. Matteo. Opere Storiche. Edited by P. Pietro Tacchi Ven- 
turi S.I. Macerata, 1911. 

Robertson, James Alexander. Magellan’s Voyage Around the 
World. Cleveland, 1906. 

Santarem, Visconde de. Estudos de Cartographia Antiga. 2 vols. 
Lisboa, 1919. see Freitas. 

Santos, Fr. Joao dos. Ethiopia Oriental e varia historia de cousas 
notaveis do Oriente. Evora, 1609. 

Saraiva, Cardeal, (D. Francisco de S. Luiz). Obras completas. 
10 vols. Lisboa, 1872-83. 

Schlegel, G. Geographical Notes, XV — Malacca (Reprinted from 
the T’oung-Pao). Leyden, 1899. 

Geographical Notes, X VI — The Old States in the Island of Suma- 
tra (Reprinted from the T'oung-Pao). Leyden, 1901 . 

Schnitger, F. M. Forgotten Kingdoms in Sumatra. Leiden, 1939. 

Schurhammer, George. Fernao Mendez Pinto und seine ‘ Pere - 
grinafam'. Sonderbruck aus ‘Asia Major’, vol. ill. Leipzig, 1927. 

S ingam, S. Durai Raja. Port Weld to Kuantan (A Study of Malayan 
Place-names). Kuala Lumpur, 1939. 

Sousa, Francisco de. Oriente conquistado ajesu Christo pelos Pa- 
dres da Companhia de Jesus daprovincia de Goa. Lisboa, 1710. 

Sousa, Manuel de Faria e. Asia Portuguesa. 3 tomos. Lisboa, 
1666, 1674, 1675. 

Stewart, Charles. The History of Bengal. London, 1813. 

Sykes, Sir Percy. A History of Persia, 2 vols. 3rd ed. London, 1930. 

Temple, Sir Richard Carnac. See Bowrey and Varthema. 

Tenreiro, Ant6nio. Itinerario em que se contem como da India veo 
por terra a estes Reynos de Portugal. Coimbra, 1923. (1st ed. 
Coimbra, 1 5 60) . See B A 1 A o . 

Thomas, Henry. In collaboration with A. Cortesao. The Discovery 
of Abyssinia by the Portuguese in 1520. London, 1938. 

Carta das Novas que Vieram ' a El Rei Nosso Senhor do Descobri- 

mento do Preste Joao {Lisboa, 1521). Lisboa, 1938. 

Thurston, Edgar. Castes and Tribes of Southern India. 7 vols. 
Madras, 1909. 



54© BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Tomaschek, Wilhelm. Die Topographischen Capital des Indischen 
Seespiegels Mohit. Wien, 1897. 

Varthema, Ludovico di. The Travels of Ludovico di Varthema. By 
J. W. Jones and G. P. Badger. Hakluyt Society, 1863. 

The Itinerary of Ludovico di Varthema of Bologna , from 1502 to 

1508. By Sir Richard Carnac Temple, London, 1928. 

V erbeck, Dr. R. D. M. Oudheidkundige Kaart van Java. 

Veth, P. j.Java, Geographisch, Ethnologisch, Historisch. 4 vols. 2nd ed. 
Haarlem, 1896. 

Viterbo, Fr. Joaquim de Sancta Rosa de. Elucidario das pala- 
vras, termos e phrases, que em Portugal antiguamente se usaram. 
Lisboa, 1798-9. 

Viterbo, Francisco Marques de Sousa. Trabalhos Nauticos dos 
Portuguezes nos Seculos XVI e XVII. Lisboa, 1890-1900. 

Voretzsch, E. A. Documento acerca da primeira embaixada portuguesa 
a China. In Boletim da Sociedade Luso-Japonesa, No. 1. Toquio, 
W29- 

Watt, Sir George. The Commercial Products of India. London, 
1908. 

Whitworth, George Clifford. An Anglo-Indian Dictionary. 
London, 1885. 

Wilkinson, R. J. The Malacca Sultanate, in Journal of the Malayan 
Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, vol. xm, part 11. Singapore, 
October, 1935. 

Winstedt, R. O. A History of Malaya. Singapore, 1935. 

Wood, W. A. R. A History of Siam from the earliest times to the year 
A.D. 1781. London, 1926. 

Yule, Sir Henry. Cathay and the Way Thither. 4 vols. New edition, 
by Henri Cordier. Hakluyt Society, 1913-16. (1st ed. 1866). 

The Book of Ser Marco Polo. 2 vols. Second edition by Henri 

Cordier. London, i9i3.(isted. 1871). 

Hobson-Jobson. A Glossary of Colloquial Anglo-Indian Words . . . 

By Sir H. Yule and A. C. Burnell. Second edition by William 
Crooke. London, 1903. (1st ed. 1886). 



INDEX 


Abarute, 125 

Abd-al-Kuri(Itheos de Canacanim), 
520 

Abendanon, E. C., xciii, 222, 533 
Abreu, Antdnio de, xix, lxxix- 
lxxxiv, 204, 210-2, 215 

Abu Bakr, 24 

Abyssinia (Abixia), lxxxvi, lxxxix, 
xciv, 7, 8, 14, 18, 53, 294, 515, 5i7 
Abyssians, 7, 8, 14, 34, 46, 268; in 
Bengal, 88; in the Deccan, 51 
Acacia catechu Wild, 44, see 
Catechu 

Achin or Atjey (Achey), 101, 135-7, 
138, 147, 163, 532 
Acoala Cagam, see Kuala Kesang 
Acoala Penajy, 259, 260, 279 
Acorus calamus Linn., 516 
Acre, 525 

Adam’s Bridge, 76 
Aden, lxxxv, 8, 11, 13-14, 15-8, 
20-1, 28, 42-3, 46, 53-4, 57, 93, 
245, 268-70, 272, 291-2, 513-4. 
5 17 

Adil Khan (Idalcam), 50-2, 61 
Adirampatnam (Adarampatana), 
271 

Adunare, lxxxi, 526 
Aegean Sea, 525 

Aeilabu (Kuala Ayer Lebu), 135-6, 
139, 140-1 

Affronts, in Malabar, 69-70; in Mal- 
acca, 93 

Afghanistan, 33 
Afiam or Anfiao, see Opium 
Afonso, Mestre, 28, 533 
Afonso, Prince, xi, xxi, xxiii, xxvii, 
lxii 

Afonso V., King of Portugal, 529 
Africa, 4, 7; in F. Rodrigues’ Maps, 
xc, xci, xciii, 519-20 
Agacim, Agacy, see Grisee 
Agagy (Agashi), 34, 38, 39 
Agallochum, 29, 113, 517, see 
Calambac 


Agenb (Al-’Adjam) = Persia, lxv, 22 
Agracij or Agacij, see Grisee 
Agujlla, 152, 517; see Calambac, 
Lignaloes, Agallochum 
Ahasuerus, 23 
Ahmad (Amet), King, 254 
Ahmadabad (Medadaue), 34-5 
Ai or Aij Island (Pulo Aee), 205-6 
Aidin, 10 

Aires, Cristdvao, lx, 106, 109, 533 
Aja Capetit (Oya Kampengpet), 109 
Akyab, 96 

Alacras, Hill of the, 237 
Al-’Adjam, see Agenb 
Alang-alang ( Imperata cylindrica 
Beauv.), xcii 

Alang Tiga, 153-4 , see Calantiga 
Alauddin (Alaoadin), King of Mal- 
acca, 194, 250-2 

Alauddin II, King of Bengal, 89, 95 
Alba, Duke of, 531 
Albergaria, Lopo Soares de, xxvii- 
xxix, xlii, xlvi, 1, lxii 
Albina Point (Cabo das Pallmas), 
520 

Albuquerque, Afonso de, xviii-xxi, 
xxiii-xxviii, lii, lxii, lxxiii, lxxviii- 
lxxx, lxxxiv-lxxxvii, xciv, xcvi, 2, 
13. 34, 53, 61, 94, no, 113, I2 8, 
152, 170, 183, 188, 195, 21 1, 229, 
258, 262, 287-9, 291-2, 521, 524, 
533; Assault on Aden, 17; Death 
of, xxvii; Expedition to Malacca, 
278-81; Expedition to the Red 
Sea, lxxxiv-lxxxvi, 291-2; Seizure 
of Malacca, xciv; Shipwreck near 
Pase, 146 

Albuquerque, (Braz) Afonso de, son 
of Afonso de Albuquerque, 229, 
533, see Comentarios 
Albuquerque, Jorge de, xx, xxvi, 
xxvii, xliii, xliv, lxxxii, 172, 219, 
287-9 

Alc&gova, Simao de, xxix-xxxi 
Alexander, Emperor, 24 


54i 



INDEX 


542 

Alexandria, 7, 12, 219, 514-5 
Alexandrina (Alum), 20 
Alforva, 46 
Ali, 18, 24-6 
Alicano, see Alutgana 
Aliga, see Liga 
Alimaria, Monte da (St. Paul’s 
Hill), 237 
Aliocacer, 515 
Alipivri, 46 
Aljofar, see Pearls 
Allur, 91 

Almadia, lxxxvi, 20 
Almanack, Ixxxix, 298-9, 313-8 
Almangor, Raja, King of Tidore, 
214, 217-8 
Almea, 517 
Almedina, see Medina 
Almeida, Antdnio de, xli 
Almeida, Cristdvao de, xxxv 
Almeida, D. Francisco de, 3 
Alocasia macrorrhiza Schott, xciii 
Aloes, 44, 514-15, 518, see Soco- 
trine Aloes 

Aloes- wood, x 13 , see Calambac 
Alor (Malua), lxxxi, lxxxiv, 200-2, 
526 

Alphonso X, King of Spain, 297 
Alpinia galanga Willd., 156 
Alpoim, Pero de, lxxix 
Alum, 20, 29, 44, 125, 263, 272, 277 
Alutgama (Alicano), 85 
Alvares, Jorge (captain of a ship. The 
first Portuguese to go to China, in 
1513), xxxviii, xl, xlvi, xlvii, liii, 
120, 283 

Alvares, Jorge (Tom6 Pires’ com- 
panion), xxxv 

Alvim, Joao Lopes de, xxv, xxvi, 
xciv, xcv, 151, 172, 521 
A Maseira, see Masirah 
Amazons, lxxvi, 32-3, 37, 163, 514 
Amballor, Caho, 528 
Ambelas, see Temblas Island 
Amber, 21, 515 

Amboina (Ambom or Ambon), 
lxxv, lxxxii, lxxxiii, xc, xcii, 209, 
210-12, 215-21, 523 
Ambrosiana, Biblioteca, 201-2 
Ameos, 46 
Amjane, 201, 527 


Ammi majus, 46 
Amocos, see Amuck 
Amoy, 129 

Amqm or Amquem, 126, 130 
Amuck (Amoco or Amoquo), 13 1, 
176, 266 

Anaimalai (Ana malee), 512 
Anatimao de Raja, 1 89 
Ancara, 295 

An-ch’a-shih (Anchaci), xli 
Ancoll, 54-5 

Andalaz, Andalas, Andallos or Am- 
dallor, 135-6, 155, *59. 160, 171 
Andaman Islands, 522 
Andarguery, see Indragiri 
Andrada, Francisco de, lxi, 533 
Andrade, Femao Peres de, xxv, 
xxvii, xix-xxxvi, xxxix, xlii, xlvi, 
li, lxxx, lxxxii, lxxxiv, 152, 262 
Andrade, Simao de, xxix, xxxvi- 
xl, lxx, lxxxvii, 129 
Andropogum Sorghum Linn., 44 
Anfiao or Afiam, see Opium 
Anjano, see Lombok 
Anjediva (Anjadiua), 55, 56, 60-1 
Ankola, 55 
Annam, 302 
Anno Bom Island, 520 
Anselm, Friar, 5 
Antimony, 29 
Anunciada (Ship), 152 
Aquesedo, liv 

Aquilaria Agallocha Roxb., 1 13 
Ara, see Herat 

Arab MSS of 1462 and 1489, 128, 

524 

Arabia, lxiv, lxx, lxxii, 2, 4, 21, 24, 
43 , 520; Deserta, 9, 11, 14-8 (see 
p. 14, note 3), 514; Felix, 7, 8, 
13-4, 514-6.; Petrea, 8, 18-9 (see 
p. 14, note 3), 58, 514 
Arabian Sea, 3, 8, see Red Sea 
Arabs, 8, 22, 34, 46, 52, 88, 104, 138, 
142, 161, 174, 182, 200, 240, 255, 
270, 514-5 
Arafat (Arefet), 1 1 
Arakan (Racam or Racao), lxiv, 2, 
89, 94, 95-7. 100, 1 10- 1, 268, 273, 
514, 516 

Aram aram, 201-2, 523, 527 
Araujo, Manuel de, xxx 



INDEX 


543 


Araujo, Rui de, xxi, xxiv, xxv, 128, 
236, 258, 277, 280-2, 287, 512 
Arcat or Arqat, 135, 148, 149, 154, 
164, 228, 268 

Areca, 52, 57-9, 82-3, 114, 170, 516 
Areca catechu Linn., 57 
Arefet, see Arafat 
Arel, Arees, 81 
Argengij (PArgandi), 33 
Aria D&mar, 185 
Aijamom, see Armagon 
Armagon Shoal (Arjamom), 91 
Armeebibliothek, Munich, 530 
Armenia, 21, 30, 515 
Armenians, 26-7, 29, 46, 268-9 
Armory, Armour, 30, 34 
Armourers, 130 

Arms, 13, 19, 33-4. 77 , 93, ”S, 130, 
174, 179, 269, see Weapons 
Aroa Islands, 147 
Arqua, 268 
Arquico, see Harkiko 
Arrack, 107, see Oraqua 
Arratel (pi. Arrateis or Arrates), 86, 
99, 101, 1x3, 144, 181,277, 278 
Arroba, 101, 277, 278 
Arsenic, 13 , see Azemef 
Artemisia abrotanum, 44 
Artemisia indica, 44 
Artemisia variabilis Ten., 44 
Artocarpus Gomeziana Wall., 137 
Aru (Banda Sea), lxxxi, lxxxiii, 118, 
209 

Aru (Sumatra), 135-6, 145-6, 147-8, 
228, 238, 244-5, 248, 251, 254, 
261,268, 282-3,513 
Ascension Island, 290, 520 
Asiatic Petroleum Co. (N.C.), Ltd. 
lviii 

Asturmalec, 41 
Atalaia (Boat), xxvi 
Athens, 4 

Atlas of c. 1615-23, 145, 532 
Atobalacho, 169 

Audela, Rajah, King of Kampar, 
151, 281, 289 
Ava, 96, hi 

Avelana Indiae (Areca), 57, 82, 86, 
S l6 

Avila, Joao de, 512 
Axelson, Eric, 533 


Aydumea (? Aidin), 10 
Aynam, see Hainan 
Ayuthia (Odia), 2, 5, 17, 65, 103, 
104, 106, 109 
Azamor, 137, 263 
Azernefe, 13, 108 
Azevedo, J. Lticio de, 100, 533 
Azhikkal, see Baliapatam 
Aziche, 44, see Vitriol 
Azinhavre, 44, 518, see Aloes 
Azores, lxxxiii, lxxxvii, 290, 520, 529 

Babylon, 21 
Ba^alor, see Basrur 
Bacanor, see Barkur 
Baccaurea Griffithii, 137 
Baccaurea malayana King., 137 
Baccaurea Motleyana Muell.-Arg., 
137 

Bachian (Pacham), xxi, 213, 216, 
218-9, 221 
Badami, 50 
Badger, G. P.,539 
Baganga, 100 

Bahar, lxxiii, 82, 101, 124, 144, 181, 
208,213,277-8 

Bahrein (Baharem), 19, 20, 517, 520 
Baiao, Antdnio, 533 
Baindur River, 61 
Baira Vera (? Brahmawar), 60, 61, 
62 

Bairacono, 74-5 
Baixos de Chilam, see Chilam 
Bajapur, 50 
Bajus, see Bugis 
Bala Hacem, 78 
Balacho, 169, 204, 216 
Balais (Rubies), 516 
Balambangan, 100, 522 
Balbi, Gaspar, 97 
Balea Patanam, see Baliapatam 
Balecy, 247 
Balfour, E., 67, 533 
Bali (Baly), lxxxi, 200-2, 305, 523, 
528 

Baliapatam (Balea Patanam), 74, 75, 
77 

Balimgao, see Weligama 
Baloches, 3 1 
Bamboos, 49 

Bamcha or Banqa, 105, 106, 1 10 



INDEX 


544 

Banca, see Banka 
Banda (Bamdam), Archipelago, 
lxxv, lxxviii-lxxxiv, xci, xcii, xciv, 
46, 47, 56, 136, 193, r 94, 200, 203, 
204, 205-9, 211 , 212, 214, 215, 220, 
222, 226, 228, 265, 268, 274, 283, 
286, 523, 526 
Banda (Near Goa), 54, 55 
Banda Hilir (Iler), 259 
Bandadkar (Bangar), 73, 74, 77 
Bandar (?Bandarpitiak), 164 
Bandon, 106 

Bang-taphang or Bang Sabhan, 106 

Bangkok, 105, 106 

BangPIassoy, 106 

Banggai (Bemgaia), 216, 221 

Banggi, 216 

Banguey, 100, 522 

Banians, 39, 41, 85 

Banjaras, 95 

Banjol, 164 

Banka (Banca), 136, 155, 157-8, 188, 
231, 268, 521-2 

B&nkot, 49 

Banqa, no, see Bamcha 
Bantam, 166, 170, 172 
Bantan, Cape, 302 
Barakat II (Xecbarqate), 1 1 
Barbas Cape (Cabo das Barbas), 519 
Barbora, see Berbera 
Barbosa, Duarte, xviii, lxv-lxvii, 
lxxiii, lxxvii, 31, 34, 36, 38-40, 44, 
49, 53-5, 60, 64, 70, 72, 74-6, 78, 
82, 90, 102, 109, 1 17, 132, 136, 
142, 147, 152, 165, 200-1, 308, 
213-4, 2x6, 218, 222, 229, 271, 
277, 533 

Barking Deer or Muntjack, 236 
Barkur (Bacanor), 60, 61, 514 
Barley, 11, 21, 33,44 
Baroda(Varodrra), 35 
Baros (Barns or Baruez), xxvi, 135-6, 
160, 161-2, 163, see Panchur 
Barros, Joao de, xx, xxiii, xxiv, xxix- 
xxxix, xlii, xlvii-xlix, li, lii, liv, lx, 
lxxviii-lxxx, lxxxii, lxxxiii, lxxxv, 
22, 31, 38, 49, 50, 55-6, 74-6, 78, 
80, 85-6, 89, 91-2, 94, 103, 105-6, 
1 10, x 12, 122, 135-6, 141, 145, 147, 
152, 154-5, 158, 160, 163, 167-8, 
170-2, 205, 214-15, 221, 223-4, 


229, 232, 234, 254, 258, 266, 271- 
2, 279, 281-2, 287-9, 521, 533, 536 
Baruaz, see Bruas 
Baruez (Cambay), see Bharoch 
Baruez (Sumatra), see Baros 
Basrur (Bafalor), 60, 61, 514 
Bassein (Baxa), 38 
Bassein (Pesmim), 97 
Bata, 135, 142, 145-6, 268 
Bataks or Battas, 145 
Batampina (Yangtze Kiang), lv 
Batara Browijaya (Batara Vojyaya 
or Vigiaja), King of Java, 174, 185, 
23° 

Batara (or Biatara) Curipan, King 
of Java, 230 
Batara Raja Quda, 179 
Batara Tamarill or Tumarill, King 
of Java, 230-2, 239, 240 
Bataram Matara, King of Java, 230 
Bataram Sinagara, 230 
Batavia, lxxxiv, 168, 17 1, 172, see 
Calapa 

Baticala, see Bhatkal 
Bato Chyna, Bato Ymbo or Bato- 
china do Moro, 221, see Gillolo 
Batojmbey, 200-2 
Batticaloa, 85 

Batu Tara (Batutara), lxxxii, lxxxiii, 
204 

Baxa, see Bassein 
Bdellium, 515 

Beads, 8, 133, 207; Red, 112, 123, 
133, see Glass beads 
Beatilha, 17, 21, 30, 53, 92 
Beejanugger, 63, see Narsinga 
Beguines, 87, 167, 177 
Beirame, 92 

Beit el Fakih (Beitall Faquj), 15 
Beituaas, see Vettuvans 
Belem (Ship), xxiii 
Bellary, 63 

Belleric myrobalans, 83 
Bells, etc. in Pegu, 102, 104 
Bells, Fruseleira, 180 
Bells music, 177 
Bely Ancoro, see Veleankode 
Bern Acorala, Sultan of Temate, 214 
Bemdara, 167, 193-4, 235. 244 , 249, 
252, 254-8, 262, 264, 265, 267, 
270, 273-4, 280-1, 283, 285, 287-8 



INDEX 


545 


Bemgaya or Bemgaia, see Banggai 
Bemu (Bemuaor), 209, 210 
Bendahara, see Bemdara 
Beneditos, 177 

Bengal (Bengala), xxix, xxx, lxiv, 
lxx, lxxii, lxxiii, 2, 4, 5, 8, 9, 13, 17, 
42. 45, 63-6, 84-5, 87, 88-95, 96-7, 
100, 104, 109, hi, 130, 133, 139, 
140, 143-4, 174, 186, 207, 216, 
224, 244-5, 268, 270, 273, 284-5, 
513-4, 522; Bay of, xcvi, 65, 98, 
522; City of Bengal (Gour)., 90, 
523; King’s succession by murder, 
88, 143 

Bengalees, 88, 104, 142-4, 161, 174, 
182, 192, 209, 240, 255, 265, 283 
Benua Quilim or Bonuaquelim, 64, 
9i, 92. 97, 139, 156, 174, 207, 216, 
265, 271-3 

Benzoin, 13, 17, 30, 98, 101, 108, 
hi, 136, 140, 143-4, 148, 156, 
1 60-1, 163, 226-7, 270, 277, 517, 
see Storax, True 

Berbera (Barbora), 8, 11, 14, 16, 19, 
43, 292 

Berbers, 14 

Ber^o (Piece of cannon), 190 
Berela, see Varella, Cape 
Berella, 154, see Pulo Berhala 
Bernam (Vernam), 248, 261 
Bertam, see Bretam 
Bertam Ulm, 234 
Bertangi, see Bretangi 
Berthelot, Pierre, 105-6, 112, 132, 
145-6, 149, 153, 160, 162-3, 170, 

172, 205, 31 I, 2l6, 220, 223-6, 

260-1,533 

Bespi^a or Vispice, 86 
Besse S.J., L., lxi 
Besuki, 198 

Betel, 52-3, 57-9, 82, 86, 103, 114, 
219, 266, 516; Goa betel, 57, 516; 
Tom6 Pires mistakes it with 
Folio Indio, 54, 516 
Bethune, Charles R. D., lxxxiii, 536 
Betunes, see Vettuvans 
Bhaja, 50 
Bharia, 49 

Bharoch or Broach (Baruez), 35,38 
Bhatkal (Baticala), xxiii, lxx, lxxi, 4, 
5,42, 58,60-2, 63, 514 


Biar, 135, 138 

Biatara Caripanan £uda, 230 
Bibi Rane, 33 

Biblioteca Nacional, Lisbon, lxiv, 
53i 

Biblioteca del Re, Turin, 530 
Biblioteca Extense, 529 
Biblioteca Laurenziana, 529 
Biblioteca da Academia das Cien- 
cias, Lisbon, 531 

Biblioth&que de la Chambre des 
Deputes, Paris, v, xiv 
Biblioth&que Nationale, Paris, 

xiii, xx, xlv, 202-2, 299, 529-30 
Bichenegher, Bidjanagar or Bij- 
anagher, 63 , see Narsinga 
Bidar (Bider), 49, 51 
Bietam, see Bretam 
Bijapur (Visapor), 49 
Bilinjao, see Vilinjam 
Billiton (Bylitam), 223, 225 
Bima (Byma), 134, 200-3, 204, 206, 
208, 220, 228, 268, 513 
Binh-Thuan, 112 

Bintang (Bynta or Bimtam), xliv, 
1ST, 244, 264, 281, 285, 288-9 
Birch, W. de Gray, 533 
Birds of paradise, 1 18, 209, 270 
Bisagudo, Simao Afonso, Ixxix 
Bisnaga or Bisnagar, 63, 65, see 
Narsinga 

Bizanaguar, see Vijayanagar 
Black Horse Square, xxii 
Black Sea, xci, xciii, 305, 525 
Blacksmiths, 86 

Black wood from Singapore, 1 23-4 
Blackwood Harbour, 91 
Blake, John William, lxxxvii, 533 
Blambangan (Bulambuam), lxxiv, 
166, 173-4, 179* 182, 196-7, 198 
Blang Raya, 1 38 
Bloodhounds, 191 
Blow-pipes, 233 

Blubarra Point (Cabo Fermosro), 
520 

Bluteau, D. Rafael, 533 
Boa Paz, 520 

Bocarro, Antdnio, 89, 99, 107, 533 
Bodleian Library, xv 
Bofeta, 93, 169 
Bombay, 33-4, 39, 50 


x 


H.C.S.II 



INDEX 


546 

Bombo, i.e. Lombo, see Lombok 
Bomtar, see Lontar 
Bongo or Buus (? Banjol), 164 
Bongon, 100, 522 
Bonuaquelim, see Benua Quilim 
Book of Francisco Rodrigues, 
290-322; Ascertaining de latitude, 
lxxxviii, 295—8; Date of the Book, 
xciii-xcv; Maps, lxxxix-xci, xciv- 
xcvi, 519-26; Navigate by sha- 
dows, lxxxix, 304-5; Panoramic 
drawings, xci-xciii, xcv, xcvi, 526- 
8; Paris Codex, xiii-xviii, lxviii, 
lxxxviii; Route to China, lxxxix, 
xcv, xcvi, 301-3; Rules of the 
leagues, lxxxix, 299-301; Rule of 
the sun’s declination, lxxxix, 303- 
4; Tables of the sun’s declination, 
lxxxix, 298-9, 313-8; Value of 
Rodrigues’ work, xcv-xcvi; Voy- 
age to Dahlak, lxxxix, xcv, xcvi, 
292-5 

Boqua China (Bukit China). 237 
Bore (Macareo), 151 
Borneo (Burney), lxx, lxxii, 100, 
103, 128-9, 132-3, 200, 220, 223-6, 
5 i 4 . 522 

Borralho, Simao, 128, 131 
Bosporus, 525 

Botelho, Jorge, xxx, xxxvi, xxxviii, 
xlii, lxxx, 521 
Botelho, Simao, 533 
Botim, Luis, lxxix 
Bowrey, Thomas, 138, 533 
Bowring, Sir John, 106, 533 
Boxer, Charles Ralph, vi, xii, 128, 
533-4 

Braga, Jack M., 121, 533 
Brahmans, 39-42, 52, 59. 63, 66-8, 
70-4, 78-81 

Brahma war, see Baira Vera 
Braja, 101 
Brambles, 190 
Brandao, Diogo, lxxxii, 215 
Brandao, Joao, xxii, 534 
Brasill, J do, 519 
Brass, 133 
Brava (Braua), 14 
Brazil, lxxviii, xc, xciii, 290, 517 
Brazil-wood, 43, 108, 123-4, 203, 
277 i 


Breard, Charles, 532 
Breath snakes, see Cobras de bafo 
Brema, see Burma 
Bretam or Bietam, 233-41 235-40, 
246-7, 251, 280-1 
Bretangi, 169, 207, 224, 227 
Brinjarries, 95 

British Museum, xii, 524, 53°-2 
British Museum (Natural History), 
xii, xciii, 236 

Brito, Cristovao de, xxiii, xxiv, 512 
Brito, Jorge de, xxix, xxx 
Brito, Jos6 Joaquim Gomes de, 534 
Brito, Rui de, xx, xxv, 132, 521 
Brocade, 108, in, 125-6, 272 
Broeh or Bruas (Island), 138 
Bruas (Baruaz), 107, 139, 144, 261 
Bruce, John, 534 

Brunei (Burney or Burnee), 132, 
224, 266, 268, 275, 283 
Buaya, 136, 153, 156-7 
Budoia, Francisco de, xxxv, xl 
Buffaloes, 180 

Bugis (Bajus), 147, 189, 226-7, 233 

Buitenzorg, 168 

Bukit China (Boqua China), 237 

Bukit Piatu, 237 

Bulambuam, see Blambangan 

Bullocks, 168 

Bulrush, 44 

Bunta, 138 

Burkill, I. H., xciii, 44, 46, 1 13, 118, 
137,145,534 

Burma (Brema), lxxii, 94, 96, 99, 
100, 109-n, 145, 522 
Burn, Sir Richard, xii 
Burnee, see Brunei 
Burnell, A. C., 534, 537 
Burney, see Borneo and Brunei 
Burning of widows, see Suttee 
Buru (Burro or Buro), lxxxi-lxxxiii, 
44, 204, 209, 21 1 
Buton (Butum) Island, 220, 226 
Butter, 29, 43-4, 98 
Buzeo, 94, see Cowry 
Bylitam or Bilitam, see Billiton 
Byma, see Bima 

Cabaio or Sabaio, 50-1, 53-4, 60 
Cabal, Cabaes, 264, 266 
Cabilas, 14, 19, 31, 206 



INDEX 


547 


Cabral, Pedro Alvares, 299 
Cagam, see Kasang 
Qacampom, see Sekampung 
Cacho, 43, 47, see Catechu 
Caguto, 86, 207-8 
Caesalpinia Brasiliensii Linn. , 108 
Caesalpinia echinata Lam., 108 
Caesalpinia SappanLinw., 108 
Cafres, 142, 158, 159, 190, 208, 249 
Cagar, see Sagar 
Cahon, 93, 94 
Caile, see Old Kayal 
Caimaes, see Kaimals 
Cairo, lxviii, 1, 7, 9-12, 14, 16-8, 21, 
29, 41, 43, 46, 268-9, 513, 515, 
525 

Caixas, 1 14, see Cash 
Caizar, 62 
Cajeput, 44 
Cajongam, 189 
Calahate, see Kalhat 
Calaim (Calay), 93, 94, 99, 100, 
170, 260-1, 274, 275, 276 
Calaluz, 194, 195-7, 200, 282 
Calambac, 113, 118, 272, 275, see 
Lignaloes and Garo 
£alamgor, see Selangor 
Calamo aromatico (Zedoary), 516 
Calamom, see Celammon 
Calamus Linn., 146 
Calantiga (Alang Tiga), 153-4, 157 
Calapa (Batavia), 166, 168, 171, 172 
Calaparaoo, 27 1 
Caldea, see Chaldea 
Calecota or Casecota, 91 
Calee, see Galle 
Caletis, see Chaliyans 
Calicate, see Kilakari 
Calico, S3, 58 

Calicut, 17, 74-5, 78-9. 80, 83-5, 
131, 191, 271-2 

Calicut Creek or Kallayi River, 75 
Calimere Point, 271 
Caliph, Caliphate, 18, 25 
Cali tore, see Kalutara 
Callnansey, 105, 106, no 
Calvo, Diogo, xxxviii, xl, xli, xlvii, 1 
Calvo, Vasco, xx, xxxviii, xl, xli, xlv, 
xlix, li, liii, liv, 117, 129; Letters of 
1524, xx, xlv-xlviii 
Camaram (Red Sea), see Kamaran 


Camaram (Java), see Samarang 
Camaran (Arabia), 15 
Qamarcante, see Samarkand 
Cambalech, Cambalu or Cambaluc 
(Peking), 117 

Cambara (Peking), 117, 119 
Cambay (Cambaia), lxiv, lxviii, lxx- 
lxxii, 2, 4, 8, 9, 13-4, 16-8, 20-1, 
30-2, 33-47, 48, 54, 57-9, 62, 66, 
70, 82-3, 87, 123, 133, 139, 169, 
244-5, 269-70, 275, 291, 512-6, 
520 

Cambodia (Camboja), lxiv, 2, 4, 

107- 8, iio - i , 112, 268, 516 
Camlet (Chamalotes), 13, 29, 43, 

108- 9, u8; Scarlet, 123 
Camoens, Luis de, xviii, 78, 102, 

1 12. 534 

(^amotora, see Sumatra 
Campar, see Kampar 
Campbell, Donald Maclaine, 174, 
185, 190, 534 

Camphor, 29, 93, 108, 123, 125-6, 
132, 1 60-1; Edible, 136, 146, 148, 
161,272, 276, 514 

Campocan, Campoquan or Cam- 
pom, 13s, 150, 151-2, 156 
Campos, Joachim Joseph A., 106, 

109 . 534 

Camta, in Java, 166 
Cana, see Sana 

Canacanim, see Palinarus Shoal 
Canacos or Canaquas, see Kaniyans 
Canada, 101, 181 
Cananor, see Cannanore 
Canaries, 290, 520 
Canarijs or Canarins, see Kanarese 
Canga, 96-7, 99, 100 
Cancheufu prison, see Kuang- 
chou-fu 

£ancy, see Shensi 
Canisius, Henricus, 5 
Canjares, 72 
Canjtam, 196, 197, 198 
Cannanore (Cananor), xxiii, xxiv, 
xxvii, lxii, lxxxv, 67, 74-5, 77, 78, 
83, 162, 271, 512 
Cannibalism, 145 
Cansi, see Kwang-si 
Cantino Map (so-called), 85, 94, 
109, 1 12-3, 120, 138, 519, 529 



INDEX 


548 

Canton (Quamtom), xx, xxxi-xlix, 
li-liii, lxii, lxiii, lxx, 115, 117-9, 
120-1, 122-4, I2 7, 129-30 
Canton River, xxx, lxxxvii, lxxxix, 
xci, xciv, xcv, 120, 121, 122, 302, 
523 

Capacity, Measures of, see Measures 
Cape of Good Hope, lxxviii, 3, 7, 
282, 290 

Cape Verde Islands, 290, 520 
£apee, see Sapeh 
Capelanguam, 96, 516 
Capemtit, see Kampengpet 
Capitam, 156 
Capocam, see Campocan 
Capocar, see Kappatta 
Caraci, Giuseppe, 530 
Carapatanam, see Kharepatan, in 
Deccan 

Carapatani, see Kharepatan, in 
Cambay 

Carapeteiro, 190 

Caratiga, see Calantiga 

Caravam, 172 

Cardamon, 180 

Carecall, see Karikal 

Carjmom or Caryman, see Karimun 

Carletti, Francesco, 127 

Car mania, 525 

Carnao, see Krawang, Cape 

Camelians, 16, 18, 43, 123, 277 

Carpenters, 72, 86 

Carpets, 13, 29, 93, 108 

Carpobalsamum, 515 

Carrots, 92 

Cartographers, 201-2, 226, 271, 
S29-32 

Carvalho, Antdnio Nunes de, 534 

Caryophyllus aromaticus Linn., 
219 

Casa da India, lxix 
Casa da Mina e India, xxiii, lxv 
Cash (Caixas), 114, 17°, *79, *8i, 
203, 206-7, 270, 275 
Cassia cinnamon or Cassia lignea, 

54. 5i 6 

Cassia fistula, 108, 180, 512-3 
Cast iron, 125 

Castanheda, Fernao Lopes de, xviii, 
xx, xxi, xxiii, xxiv, xxvi-xxix, xxxii 
xxxiii, xxxv, xlix, liv, lx, lxxviii, 


lxxx, lxxxiii, lxxxiv, 61, 78, 80, 85, 
94, 97-9, x 10, 122, 142, 145, I5 I_2 > 
165, 212, 221, 223-4, 229, 235, 
279, 281-2, 287-9, 521, 534 
Castes of Malabar, 72 
Castilho, Jxilio de, xxii, 534 
Castor-oil, 69 

Castro, D. Joao de, xviii, lxxvii, 17, 
39, 49,55,66, 291,534 
Cat’s-eyes, 516 

Catalan Map (1375-81), 58, 120, 528 
Cate (100,000), 260, 270 
Cate (Borneo), 132, 223, 225 
Cate or Catty, 94, 99, 101, 104, 124, 
132, 144, 181, 263,275-7 
Catechu, 43-4, 47, 114, 123, 169, 
270 

Catur, 73 

Caturna, 100 

Caucasus, 37, 514 

Cauchy Chyna, see Cochin China 

Cauvarey River, 27 1 

Caxonias (Boxes), 130 

Caya Coulam, see Kayankulam 

Cayde, 169-70 

Cedayo, see Sidayu 

Ceilam, see Ceylon 

Ceira, see Ceram 

Ceitil, 36, 99, 125, 140, 144, 170, 
181,243,275 
Cejlam, 209, 210 
Celabao or Celauam, see Chilaw 
Celaguym gum or Celaguy guy, 

136, 150 

Celammon (Calamom), 205 
Celates, Archipelago, lxxix, 136, 
156, 241; People, 147, 148, 149, 
156-7, 227, 233-6, 238, 250, 262, 

264 

Celebes (Celebe), 44, 216, 220-1, 
222, 223, 226, 522 
Centurione, Luigi, 34 
Ceram or Cerang (Ceira), Ixxxi, 
lxxxiii, xcii, 208, 209-n, 212, 216, 
218, 221, 523 

Cerina De Raja, see Sri Nara Diraja 
Ceruse, 518 
Ceybam, see Jebel Tei'r 
Ceylon (Ceilam), Ixiv, lxxi, lxxii, 42, 
64, 66, 71, 76, 80-3, 84-7, 268, 272, 
2 79, 2 9L 516-7 



INDEX 


549 


Chaldea (Caldea), io 
Chaliyam (Chaliaa), 74, 75, 78 
Chaliyans (Caletis), 72 
Chaliyar or Chalium River, 75 
Chamalc Malec, 41 
Chamalotes, see Camlet 
Chambafal, Rice, 62 
Chamcheo or Chancheo, see Chang- 
chou 

Chamda or Chamdy, 166, 198 
Champa, lxiv, 108, no, 112-14, 
115, 118, 126, 183, 185, 265, 268, 
302 

Champana (Sampan), 155 
Champaner (Champanell), 35, 41, 
103 

Champara, Terra de, 302 
Chang, T’ien-tse, xxxi-xxxiv, xxxix, 
xli, xliii, 1 19, 122, 534 
Chang-chou (Chancheo or Chin- 
cheo), xxxiv, liii, 119, 126, 130, 
265 

Chantansay, no 

Chaquem Daraxa, see Muhammad 
Iskandar Shah 

Charnao, Ponta de, see Tanjong 
Pontang 

Chassigneux, Edmond, 128, 534 
Chatrias, see Kshatriyas 
Chaul or Cheul, 33, 48, 49, 51, 53-4, 
57, 61, 88, 268, 271-2, 512-3, 5x6 
Chautar, 92 
Chaym, Garcia, xx 
Chebulic myrobalans, 83, 132, 514 
Cheguaa, 243-4 
Cheguide, 166, 171 
Cheltenham, 201 
Chemano, see Chi Manuk 
Cheng Tsu, Ming Emperor, 117 
Cherimon (Chorobam), xxvi, 159, 
160, 166, 173, 182, 183, 189 
Cheruman Perumal, King, 78 
Chestnuts, 29 
Chettis, 62, 78, 214 
Chetwayi (Chetua), 73-6, 79, 83 
ChiAngke, 171 
Chi Durian, 17 1 

Chi Manuk (Chemano), 159, 160, 
166, 168, 173, 174, 182, 521 
Chi Sadane (Qidigi or Cheguide), 
171 


Chi Sangarung, 183 

Chiammay Lake, 302 

Chiang-su, see Kiangsu 

Chiaoa, see Siau 

Chifu, lv, lvi 

Chih, Chio or Chiao, 303 

Chilam or Chilao, Baixos de, 64, 76, 

85, 271, 5i3 

Chilaw (Celabao), 76, 85-6 
China, xxvii-lxv, lxix-lxxiii, xci, 
xciii-xcvi, 2-5, 8, 17, 44, 47, 93, 
99, 103-4, 106-8, 1 1 1-2, 114-5. 
116-28, 129-34, I 7°. 181, 186, 
203, 222-3, 232, 241-5, 274, 276, 
283-5, 287, 517, 522-3; Christian- 
ity in, 1 ; Emperor or King of, xxxi, 
xxxiii-xxxv, xxxvii-xl, xliii, xlix-li, 
lxii, 114, 116, 118-9, 179; First 
Portuguese to, xxxviii, 120, 283; 
F. Rodrigues’ ‘Route to China’, 
lxxxix, 301-2 
China (Porcelain), 98-9 
China Wall, 302 
Chincheo, see Chang-chou 
Chinese, xxxvii,lxxviii, lxxix, 103-4, 
116, 130, 174, 179, 182, 185, 192, 
242-6, 248-50, 265, 268, 283, 512, 
514; Like Germans, 1 16; Women, 
117 

Chinese Fleet, xxx, xxxi, xliii, 122-3 
Chinkiang, lvi, lvii 
Chinqele, see Singkel 
Chitakuli, 56 
Chitarum River, 171 
Chittagong, 90 
Ch’iungchou, 120 
Chombakulu (Combaa), 74-5, 78 
Chopsticks (First European de- 
scription), 1 16 
Chorobam, see Cherimon 
Choromandel, lxiv, 2, 63, 64, 66, 
77, 82-4, 86, 89, 91-2, 169, 271-2, 
5i3 

Chotomuj, see Cotinuo 
Christians, Abyssinia, 8; Arabia, 12; 
Armenia, 26-7, 268; Cambay, 39; 
China, 1 ; Cimtura, 12; Malabar, 
73; Renegade, 34 
Ch’iian-chou, 119 
Chukiang (Canton River), 121 
Chultram Point, 76 



INDEX 


550 

Chumpim or Compim (Tsung- 
ping), xxxiii 

Chung-chou Island, 123 
Chunghing, lvii 
Ciac, see Siak 

Cidade de Bemgalla, see Bengal, 
City of 

Cidade da China, xci, 523, see 
Peking 

Cidade Dorixa, see Orissa, City of 

Cimbava, see Sumbawa 

Cimtacora, 54-6 

Cimtura, Christians of the, 1 2 

Qinam (PJizam), 15 

Cindy, 38, see Sind 

Cinjojum, 260-1 

Cinnamomum TamalaFn'es., 54 
Cinnamon, 21, 85-7, 516-7 
Cirj (Betel), 266 
Citor, 200-2 
Citrine myrobalans, 83 
Clam, see Klang 
Clamtam, see Kelantam 
Cloths, 13, 17, 21, 29, 30, 43, 46, 53, 
58, 78, 86, 92-3, 96, 98, 107, 123, 
131, 148, 161, 169, 180, 206-8, 
216, 220, 224, 269-70. Bengal, 
1 1 1-2, 1 14, 130, 133, 180, 207, 
224, 227; Bonuaquelim, 207; Cam- 
bay, 8, 16, 29, 43, 86, 163, 169, 
180, 204, 208, 216, 227; Ceylon, 
180; China, 125-6; Deccan, 53; 
Goa, 58; Gujarat, 152-3, 156, 207, 
Java, 180; Kling, 108, 114, 133, 
152-3, 156, 169, 180, 225, 227, 
272; Madura, 227; Moluccas, 216; 
Siam, 108 

Cloths (Sorts), see Atobalacho, Bala- 
cho, Beatilha, Bierame, Bofeta, 
Bretangi, Brocade, Ca£uto, Calico, 
Camlet, Cayde, Chautar, Cora- 
fones, Cotobalacho, Cotonias, Da- 
mask, Enrolado, Enrolado de la- 
drilho, Lamedares, Loos, Maindis, 
Mantaz, Muslin, Panchavelizes, 
Patola, Purava, ? Sabones, Sarasa, 
Satin, Scarlet-in-grain, Silken, 
Sinabafo, Sinhava, Tafessira, 
Taffeta, ? Taforio, Tiricandie, 
Topitis, Turia, Vispice, Woollen, 
Xaas 


Clove Islands (Moluccas), lxxviii, 
lxxxi, 21 1, 213 

Cloves, 16, 21, 43, 86, 93, 99, IO °> 
112, 114, 123, 159, 2 °4> 2 °7, 213-S, 
216, 217—8, 219, 221, 241, 257, 
270, 272, 277, 281, 521 

Cobras de bafo, 72 
Cobras de capelo, 72-3 
Cocanada, 91 

Cochin, xix, xxiv-xxix, lxii, lxx, 
lxxiii, lxxviii, 70, 74, 76, 79-80, 83, 
86, 97, 144, 168, 175, 271-2, 278-9 
Cochin China (Cauchy Chyna), 
xxvi, xxix, xxx, lxiv, lxix, 2, 108, 
109, no, 1 12-3, 114-15, 118-9, 
126, 203, 268, 275, 302, 517 
Coconut, 82 
Coconut oil, 69, 82-3 
Coconut palm, xcii, 82-3, 107 
Coconut water (Lanha), 69, 513 
Qocotora, see Sokotra 
Cocunam, 167 
Codaudam, 41 
Coelho, Alvaro, 215 
Coelho, Duarte, xxix, xxx, xxxiv, 
xxxvi, xl, xliii 
Coelho, Jos6 Ramos-, 533 
Coffers, Gilt, 130 

Coinage, 13, 20, 21, 36, 58, 77, 86, 
93-5, 96-7, 99-100, 104, ns, 140, 
144,170,181,275 

Coins, see Can£a, Cahon Calaim, 
Cash, Caturna, Ceitil, Cruzado, 
Dinar, Drama, Fanao, Madaforxa, 
Mastamude, Orao, Pagode, Par- 
dao, Pon, Quarto, Tanga, Tanqat, 
Vintem, Xerafim 
Coir, 82, 83-4, 136 
Coition in Malabar, 69 
Cojatar, see Kwaja Attar 
Coleroon River, 271 
Colla Bay, 55 

Collection of Voyages and Tra- 
vels, A, 172 

Collingridge de Tourcey, George, 
xciii 

Colombo (Columbo), 85-7 
Qolor, see Sulu 
Columbus, Christopher, lxxx 
Combaa, see Chombakulu 
Comber, see Komber 



INDEX 


55 1 


Combula, see Kumbla 
‘Comentarios de Afonso de Albu- 
querque’, lvi, lxxviii-lxxx, Ixxxv, 
lxxxvii, 97, no, 117, 155, 170, 
211, 229, 234, 244, 2SO-I, 266, 
279, 281-2, 524, 533-4 
Comorin, lxix, lxxi, 66, 73-4, 76, 
80, 81, 84-5,291,513,520 
Comoro Islands, 290, 520 
Companies, Ship, 46, 269 
Concam or Conquao (Tsung-kuan), 
xxxiii 

Concusa, no 
Congreve, William, li 
Conjmjij, 271, see Pondicherry 
Constantinople, 22, 525 
Coondapur or Kundapur, 60-1 
Coos or Cous, 89, 513 
Coote, Ch. H., xciii 
Copper, 13, 43, 86, 93, 96-9, 108, 
125, 130-1, 180, 269, 272, 277, 

525 

Copperas, 20, 29, 44 
Copymy or Coximim, see Cosmin 
Coraqones, Cloths, 207, 208 
Coraqoni, see Khorasan 
Coral, 269, 275 

Cordier, Henri, li-liii, 75, 138, 534 
Comer, E. J. H., 137, 145, 534 
Correa, Francisco Antdnio, 277, 
534 

Correia, Antdnio, xxxvi 
Correia, Gaspar, xviii, xx, xxi, 
xxiii, xxiv, xxvii, xxix-xxxi, xxxiv, 
xxxv, xxxviii, xlix, lii, lx, lxxix, 
lxxx, Ixxxiv, Ixxxv, lxxxvii, 75, 78, 
80, 98, 122, 152, 229, 279, 281-2, 

534 

Corrientes, Cape, 520 
Corsairs, 31, 122, 227-8, 250, 264, 
see Pirates and Sea robbers 
Cortesao, Antdnio Augusto, 534 
Cortesao, Eduardo Luis, xii 
Corveiro, Cape, 520 
Cosmin (Copymy i.e. Coxymy, or 
Coximim), 97-8, 10 1 
Costa, Abel Fontoura da, lxviii, 
lxxxix, 296-301, 304, 519, 529, 

535 

Costus, 44 
Cota, see Kottayam 


Cota fanao, 77 

Cotinuo or Chotomuj, 105, 106, no 
Cotobalachos, 204, 216 
Cotonias, 169 
Cotton, 44, 90, 136, 156-9 
Cotton material, 43 
Coty Coulam, see Kattakulam 
Coulam, see Quilon 
Coulam-Pamdaranj, see Kollam- 
Pantalayini 

Coutinho, D. Antonio Pereira, 44, 
535 

Coutinho, Martim Afonso de Melo, 
xlii, xliii, xlvi, xlviii 
Couto, Diogo do, xxviii, lx, 22, 76, 
85-6, 103, 138, 198, 229, 535, 536 
Cowry or Kauri, 93-5, 96-7, 100, 
104, 108, 225 
Cows, 169, 180 
Coxymy, see Cosmin 
Cramganor, see Kranganur 
Crawfurd, John, 128, 131, 147, 168, 
171-2, 183, 185, 190, 211, 224, 
535 

Cresques, Abraham, 529 
Cresques, Jafuda, 529 
Crimea, 525 
Crodi (? Kotri), 33 
Crone, Gerald Roe, xii 
Crooke, William, 126, 535 
Cruz, Alonso de Santa, 202 
Cruzado, 17, 86, 92, 94, 99, 100, 
113, 131-2, 140, 144, 152, 170, 181, 
186, 208, 214, 263, 270, 272, 274- 
6, 284, 512 
Crystal, 8 
Cuaij, see Haruku 
Cuama River, 94 
Cuaquem, see Suakin 
Cubeb, 16, 159, 180, 191 
Cu9uf, Raja, King of Bachian, 218 
Cucumbers, 92 
Cuddalore, 271 
Quencynjgujs River, 164 
Cuiavem see Kusavans 
Cultarey (? Nellore), 64, 91 
Cumboo, 44 
£umda, see Sunda 
Cumderi, 275 
Cumin, 46 

Cuminum Cyminum Linn . , 46 



INDEX 


552 

Cunci Teras (PSungidaras), 164 
Cunebet£ Lake, 302 
Cunjmeyra (Pondicherry), 64, 271, 
5i3 

Cunningham, Alexander, 33, 535 
Cupall Mullc, see Kutb-ul-Mulk 
Cupom, 275 
Curia Deva, 214 
Curia Muria, see Kuria Muria 
Curiaraja, or Curia Raja, xxx, 134 
Curiate, see Quryat 
Qurrate, see Surat 
Currency, see Coinage and Coins 
£urubaia, see Surabaya 
Cury, see Cowry 
Cutch, 44, see Catechu 
Cutell Mamaluqo, see Kutb-ul- 
Mulk 

Cuttack, 91, 523 
Cymbopogum Schoenanthus 

Spreng, 514 
Cyrus, 23 

Dabhol (Dabull), 48-9, 52-3, 88, 
268, 271-2 

Dabiam, see Jebel Manhali 
Dacanis, 63 

Dachim, Dachem or Datchim, 101, 
277-8 

Dagon (Dogo), 97, 98, 10 1-2 
Daha or Daya, 190-1 
Dahanu (Dionj), 34, 38, 39 
Dahlak (Dalaca), lxxxiv-lxxxvi, 
xciv, xcv, 8, 9, 13-4, 16-7, 292-5, 
517; F. Rodrigues’ rutter to Dah- 
lak, lxxxix, xcv, xcvi, 292-5 
Dahlak Kebir, 295 
Dahlgren, E. W., 131, 524, 535 
Daibul, see Dewal 
Daio, see Dayo 
Dala, 95 

Dalaca or Dalaqa, see Dahlak 
Dalgado, Sebastiao Rodolfo, xxxiii, 
49, 59, 60, 62, 64, 68, 70-2, 77, 86, 
93, 100, 109, hi, 1 14, 137, 140, 
169, 264, 275-6, 283, 516, 535 
Daman (Damana), 34, 39 
Damascus (Damasquo), 10, 43, 515 
Damask, 93, 98, in, 125-6, 130, 
270, 272 

Damdriuar, see Devgarh 


Dames, Mansel Longworth, 31, 35, 
40, 44, 49, 54, 5 6 , 60, 72, 75, 81, 
85, 97, 1 1 3, *38, 175,201, 216, 224, 
535 

Damietta (Damjata), 7 
Damj, 62 

Dance, Dancers, Goa, 59; Java, 177; 

Malabar, 65, 72 
Dande (Danda), 48-9, 51 
Dandy, J. E., xii, xciii 
Danvers, Frederick Charles, 10, 535 
Daquem, see Deccan 
Daria Tima de Raja, 179 
Darius, 23 

Darrama, Ponta, see Ramas, Cape 
Daru, see Aru 
Dasht River, 3 1 
Dasturcan (Dastur Khan), 34 
Dates, 45 

Dato Sri Nara Diraja, 194 
Datura Stramonium Linn., 69 
Ddvila, Joao, xxiv 
Daya (Java), see Daha 
Daya (Sumatra), 135-6, 163 
Dayo or Daio (Sunda), 166, 168, 

172-3, 175 

Deccan (Daquem), lxxii, 20-1, 33, 
35-6, 42, 45-6, 48-54, 57-8, 62, 
64, 268, 270, 514 
Deer, 180, 236, 260 
Delhi (Delij), 21,29, 31-3,36-7, 48, 
63-4, 9°, 514-6 
Deli River, 147-8 
Demak (Demaa), 151-2, 154-5, 
159, 160, 166, 176, 183, 184, 185- 
6, 188, 195 

Dennys, N. B., 101, 535 
Denuce, Jean, 128, 201, 224, 524, 
53°, 535 

Destombes, Marcel, 530 
Devgarh (Damdriuar), 54-5 
Dewal or Daibul (Diul), 38, 513 
Dewundara, Devundara or De- 
winuwara (Tenavarque), 85-6 
Dhadar River, 39 
Dhar, 37 

Dharmapatna, see Durmapatan 
Dhofar (Tufar), 78, 513 
Dhu-l-leurash, 295 
Diamonds, 86, 89, 108, 115, 223-5; 

In privy parts, 104 



INDEX 


Dias, Tomas, 113 
Dinar, 140 
Dindings, 107 
Dionj, see Dahanu 
Dni, 35,38,41.53,84, 520 
Diul, see Dewal 
Diul-Sind, 38 

Diva or Diua, 53, 82, see Maldives 

Djangan, 196 

Djember or Jamber, 198 

Dobad, 138 

Dogo, see Dagon 

Dondra Head, 86 

Dourado, Fernao Vaz, 105, 107, 
1 13, 1 19, 129-31, 133, 138, 149- 
50, 159, 168, 172, 198, 201, 202, 
208-10, 212, 222-4, 226, 261, 271, 

531-2 

Dowson, John, 536 
Draftsmen, 130 
Dragon's-blood, 16 
Dram, 93, 170, 275, 277 
Drama (Coin), 140, 144, 275 
D’Rozario, 95, 536 
Du$ao, 232, 260 
Durians, 137, 260 
Durmapatan (Tarmapatam), 74-5, 
77 

Eagle- wood, 113, see Calambac 
Eanes, Gon?alo, xxiv 
Edetrias, hi 

Egypt (Egipto), lxvi, lxxii, 7, 9-10, 
11, 19, 5 1 5, see Sultan of Egypt 
El Qoseir (La9ari or Lo9ari), 14, 17, 
5i5 

Elephantiasis, 68-9 
Elephants, 33, 40-1, 52, 64, 80, 
85-7, 89, 90, 96, 102, hi, 167, 178, 
191, 200, 236, 245, 250, 260, 265 
Elephants’ tusks, 1 12, 123, 515 
Elliot, SirH. M.,536 
Elpaputi Bay, 210 
Emblic myrobalans, 83 
Embr&ndiris, 68 
Emeralds, 86 

Empoli, Giovanni da, see Impoli, 
Joannes 

Enciso, Fernandez, 299 
Encyclopaedia Britannica, lxi, lxv, 
536 


553 

Encyclopaedia of Islam, The, 536 
Engano Island, 162 
England (Imgratera), 519 
English, Called Cafres, 142 
English Bazar, 90 
Enrolado, 93, 98, 133, 169 
Enrolado de ladrilho (Chequered), 
125, 133, 169, 180, 207, 216 
Entufash, lxxxv 

Eredia, Emanuel Godinho de, 98, 
105, 1 13, 137, 145, 149-50, J 6o, 
162-3, 187, 201-2, 226, 229, 234, 
237, 259, 536 

Erva lombrigueira, see Wormwood 

Esh-Shihr, see Sheher 

Esparto, 136 

Espera (Cannon), 152 

Espera (Ship), xxx 

Esquinanthus, 514 

Essex, Earl of, xv 

Esther, Book of, 23 

Ethiopia, 7, 8, see Abyssinia 

Eunuchs, 178 

Euphrates, lxvi, lxx, 4, 30 

Eurasians, 60 

Europe, In F. Rodrigues' maps, xci, 
519 , 525 

Falcao, Antdnio Lobo, xxix, xxx 
Falcao, Manuel, xxix 
Fanao, 77, 86, 94 
Fanshui, lvii 

Far East, In F. Rodrigues’ maps, 
xciii, xcv, xcvi, 521-5 
Fara^ola, 276-7 
Faria, Pedro de., xxxv 
Fartak (Fartaque), 8, 14, 19, 513 
Fatima, 24 
Favre, Abb6 P., 232 
Federici, Cesare de, 97 
Fenugreek or Fenugraec, 46 
Feodosia, 525 

Ferguson, Donald, xx, xli, xlii, xlvi, 
xlviii, li-liv, 85, 536 
Fermoso or Fremoso River, 243, 262 
Fermosro, Cabo, see Blubarra Point 
Fernandes, Domingos, lxxxvii 
Fernandes, Duarte, xxxv, xxxviii 
Fernandes, Isabel, xxii 
Fernandes, Joao, xix, xxii 
Fernando Po, Island, 520 



INDEX 


554 

Ferrand, Gabriel, 113, 128, 146-7, 
I S 5 > 158-9, 229, 231-2, 243-4, 

250, 524, 536 

Ferrara, Duke of, 529 
Ferro, Cabo do, 202, 526 
Fetid gums, 515 
Ficalho, Conde de, 46, 95, 536 
Fidalgo, Pero, 133 
Figs, 24, 92, 261 
Figueira do inferno, 69 
First India, lxx, 5, 54, 60, 65, 270 
Fishers, 72, 93, 238 
Fishing-nets, 13 1 
Fitch, Ralph, 97 
Flanders, 125 
Flemings, 20 
Fleurieu, Comte de, xiv, xv 
Flores Head (Cabo das Flores), 202, 
526 

Flores Island, lxxxi-lxxxiii, xcii, 
200-2, 523, 526 

Foguo, or Fogo, Jlha do, see Gunong 
Api (Banda) and Sangeang Island 

Folia malabathri, 54 
Folio Indo (Folium indum), 54, 
219, 516 

Foochow, 129-30 
Foqem or Foquem, see Fukien 
Formosa, 129, 525 
Fortresses, Portuguese, 66-7, 172, 
280-1 

Forts, Portuguese, 49, 60, 75 
Foumereau, Lucien, 106, 536 
Foz Inhatumbo, 520 
Franks, (Framges), 255, 257 
Frataa (Euphrates), 30 
Freire, Anselmo Braamcamp, 534 
Freire, Joao, xix 
Freitas, Jordao A. de, lxi, 536 
Freitas, Pero de, xlviii 
Fremoso River, see Fermoso 
French, 20 
Friesland (Frisa), 519 
Frol de la Mar (Ship), lxxix, 145, 
146 

Fruseleira or Freseleira, 13, 96-7, 
99, 102, 125, 180, 272 
Fukien (Foqem), xxiv, 119, 127, 

I29'30 

Fuseleira, see Fruseleira 
Fuzeiro, Alvaro, xxxvi 


Galangal, Greater or Java, 156, 513 
Galbanum, 515 
Galle (Calee), 85 
Gall-nuts, 108 

Galvao, Antonio, xviii, xxi, xxix, 
xxx, lx. lxxx-lxxxiii, 102, 105, 133, 
145, 201-2, 204-5, 210, 536 
Galvao, Duarte, 279 
Gama, D. Aires da, xxiii, xxiv, 512 
Gama, D. Estevao da, xlvi, xlvii 
Gama, D. Vasco da, xxiii, xlvi, 
lxxx, 96, 299 
Gam^a, see Canfa 
Gamda, 166, 180, 196-7 
Game-birds, 33 

Gamispola, 85, 134-6, 137-8, 160, 
162, 165, 291 

Gandar, Dominique, lvii, lix, 536 
Gandhar (Guendarj), 38-9 
Gangawali River, 60 
Ganges, hex, 4, 5, 63, 65, 90, 91, 522 
Ganta, 101, 181, 278 
Gar^opa, see Gersoppa 
Garlic, 98, 156, 287 
Garnett, W. J., lix 
Garo, Garu, Guaro or Gaharu, 113, 
118, 152, see Calambac 
Gaspar da India, 272 
Gastaldi, Giacomo, 13 1 
Genoese, 45, 525 

Genoese Pilot, Account of the, 
133-4 

Geresik, see Grisee 

Gerini, G. E., 109, 536 

Germans, Chinese are like, 116; 

Liukiuans are like, 129 
Germany, 127 

Gernez, D6sir£, xii, lxxxix, 301 
Gersoppa (Garfopa), 61-2 
Gezelius, Birger, 13 1 
Gibraltar, 5x9 

Gidom or Gidne, Tomas, see Wind- 
ham, Thomas 
Giles, Herbert A., lix, 536 
Giles, Lionel, xii, 118, 126 
Gilimao, see Lucipara 
Gillolo (Bato Ymbo), Island, 208, 
216, 221 

Gillolo (Jeilolo), Port, 221 
Ginger, 17, 21, 82-3, 92, 513 
Ginger-grass, 514 



INDEX 


555 


Gira£al, Rice, 62 
Glass, 13, 16, 269 

Glass beads, 8, 13, 16, 43, 133, 269 
Glassware, 269 

Goa (Guoa), xxiii, xxvii, xxix, lxx, 
lxxii, lxxxiv, lxxxv, 4, 13, 17, 20-1, 
42, 45, 48, 50, 52-3, 54-6o, 61-4, 
76-7, 88, 268, 271-2, 516, 532; T. 
Pires’ appreciation of, 53, 56-8; 
New Goa (Guoa Noua), 54-5; Old 
Goa (Guoa Velha), 54-5; Women 
of, 59 

Goats, 169, 180, 191, 261 
Godavari (Guadovarij), 91, 271 
Godinha, Maria, xxii 
Gogha (Guogua), 34, 38 
Gois, Damiao de, xxi, xxix-xxxi, 
xxxv, xxxvii, xxxviii, lxxviii, lxxxv, 
lxxxvii, 68, 122, 235, 254, 279, 

282, 287-9, 536 

Gold, 8, 16-7, 2i, 43-4, 93, 99, 1°°, 
104, 108, 1 12, 113, 114-5, 125, 
130-2, 134, 140, 144, 148-50, 
152-4, 156, 158-61, 169-70, 180-1, 
192, 203, 208-9, 216, 222-8, 245, 
250, 258, 262-4, 267, 270, 272, 
274, 285-6, 514; Coinage, 164-5; 
Mines, 164-5; Value in Malacca, 
275-6 

Golden glassware, 269 
Goldsmiths, 72 

Gomes, Joao, lxxxiv-lxxxvii, 292 
Gonsalves, Bartolomeu, 218 
Gonsalves, G., 1 
Goram or Gorong (Guram), 209 
Gores or Guores, lxxviii, 128-9, 524 
Gour or Gaur (City of Bengal), 90-1, 
523 

Gourds, Indian, 92 

Grand Canal (China), liv-lix, lxii, 

523 

Gray, Albert, 537 
Great Tawali, 218 
Gt. Waling or Ortata, 205 
Greece, 22, 43, 525 
Greyhounds, 178, 200, 236 
Grisee (Agracij or Agacy), xxvi, lxxx, 
lxxxiii, 45-6, 159-60, 166, 183-4, 
189-90, 192-5, 196, 214, 227-8, 

283, 528 

Groeneveldt, W. P., 138, 140-1, 537 


Gualla, 265-6 

Guardafui, lxxxv, 8, 13, 61, 290, 515 
Guaro, see Garo 
Guedes, Martim, xxv, xxx, xxxi 
Guendarj, see Gandhar 
Guerreiro, Fernao, 21 1, 537 
Guilan (Guilani), 22, 30, 34 
Guilans, 34, 42, 46 
Gujarat, 36, 45-6, 101, 107, 207, 
254, 269-70, 272, 279 
Gujarat Jogee, 36 

Gujaratees, 41, 42, 45-7, 66, 109, 
142, 144, 159-62, 165, 174, i 8 2, 
192, 255, 257, 265, 268, 270, 280, 
283; Like Italians, 41 
Gulbarga, see Kulbarga 
Gule Gule or Guli Guli, lxxxi- 
lxxxiii, 209, 210 
Gum-arabic, 515 

Gunong Api (Gumuap£), lxxxi, 
lxxxiii 

Gunong Api (Banda), 205-6 
Gunong Api (Sumbawa), see San- 
geang Island 

Gunong Ledang (Gulom Leydam), 
162-3, 236, 260 
Guoa, see Goa 

Guogua or Guogari, see Gogha 
Guores, see Gores 
Guram, see Goram 
Guste, 175, 179 

GustePate, 166, 174, 175-6, 178-80, 
186, 189-91, 196-8, 227, 229, 
282-3 

Gynandropsis gynandra Brig., 
xciii 

Hacabar, 24 
Haggi, 12 

HaiTao (Hi Taao) 122 
Hainan (Aynam), 119, 120, 126-7, 
302-3, 517, 523 
Hakluyt, Richard, lxxxiii 
Hakluyt Society, xi, xvi; Portu- 
guese books published, lxxvii 
Halde, Jean Baptist du, lvii, 537 
Halmaheira, see Gillolo, Island 
Hamilton, A., 224 
Hamy, E.-T., lxxxiii, xciii, 204, 210, 
537 

Hanafi (Anafij), 24 



INDEX 


556 

Hanbali (Hambarj), 24 
Hangchow, lvii 
Harkiko (Arquico), lxxxvi 
Harriers, 200 
Haruku or Oma (Qoay or Cuaij), 
210-12 

Hatiling Bay, 210 
Hats, 29 

Hellebore, 225, 233 
Henri ques, D. Sancho, xliii 
Herat (Ara), 33 
Hi Taao, see Hai Tao 
Hides, 44 

High India, lxx, 2, 5 
Hitu (Yta), 210-1 
Hiyang Mountain, 198 
Hodanan (? Kwaja Mukaddan), 50 
Holy Land, 5 
Holy Sepulchre, 10, 11 
Homem, Diogo, 55, 105-6, 120, 
129, 147, 150, 155 , 159, 161, 1 68, 
172, 201-2, 209, 221-4, 261, 271, 
53i 

Homem, Lopo, 31, 38, 49, 94, 105, 
107, 119-20, 122, 126, 129, 131, 
147 , iS°, IS 4 -S, iS9-6i, 168, 170, 
172, 200-2, 205, 209-1 1, 213, 222- 
4,226, 261,271,524, 53i 
Honawar or Honavar (Onor), 54, 
60, 61, 270 

Honey, 29, 44, 132, 136, 146, 148, 
151, 153, 156-8, 1 60-1, 183, 224, 
263, 517 

Honfleur, 532 

Honimoa or Saparua (Vull), 210-2 
Hooghly, see Ugli 
Hornbill, 118 

Horses, 8, 15, 17, 20-1, 29, 31-5, 40, 
43-4, 52-3, 62, 81, 89, 90, 1 1 1-3, 
1 15, 1 17, 160, 167, 173-4, 191, 
198, 200, 202-3, 227; Shod with 
copper shoes, 127 
Hos, Kingdom of, 516 
Hosten, H., lxi 
Hounds, 178, 191 
Hsia P’ei (Lower P’ei), lviii 
Hsin-an, 121 

Hsin-p ’ei-chou, lv, lvii, lxiii, see 
Sampitay 
Huai-yuan, xxxii 
Hucham, Port of, 123 


Hugli, 91 

Huns Murad Point, 291 
Huntington Library, California, 

53i 

Hyderabad, 50 
Hyeri, 74-5, 77 

IbnBatuta, 55, 120 

Ibu, Mount and River, 208 
Icatra, see Jacatra 
Idalhan or Idalcam, see Adil Khan 
Idrisi, Abu Abdallah Mohammed 
Ibn, 120 

Ilan&re or Iranary (Ceylon), 85 
Iler, 259, 282 
Ilhas Allagadas, 523 
Ilhas Primeiras, see Comoro Islands 
Imdi (Port), 38 
Imdia Alta, see High India 
Imdia Meyaa, see Middle India 
Imdia Primeira, see First India 
Imdia Segunda, see Second India 
Imperata cylindrica Beauv., xcii 
Impole, Joannes (Giovanni da 
Empoli), xxix, xxxii, xxxiv, 94 
Incense, 123, 270, 277, 513 
Indian corn, 44 

Indian or Eastern Archipelago, 

lxiv, lxv, lxvii, lxxii, lxxiii, xciii, 
xcv, xcvi, 135-228, 513 
Indian myrobalans, 83 
Indians (Name), 513 
Indigo, 43, 269 
Indo, 36, 37-8,513 
Indo-China, lxxii, 112 
Indragiri (Andarguery), no, 135-6, 
152, 153 , i54, 156, 164,243-6, 248, 
251, 253, 263, 268, 282 
Indus (Jmdus or Indy), lxx, 4, 37-8 
limes, C. A., 68 
Iranary or I lan dr e (Ceylon), 85 
Iravas or Yravas, 72 
Irawadi River, 94, 97-8 
Ireland (Irllamda), 519 
Iron, 17, 21, 62, 125, 156-7, 215-6; 
Cast, 125 

Iskandar Shah (Xaquem Darxa), 
see Muhammad Iskandar Shah 
Islam, 24 
Issaba, 303 
Italians, 41 



INDEX 


557 


Italy, 21,43,67, 515 
Ivory, 8, 86, 108, 208, 216, 515 
Iyer, L. K. Anantha Krishna, 71, 
537 

Jaaoa, see Java 
Jabongon, 100 
Jacatra or Jakatra, 168, 172 
Jacobites, 12 
Jaffa, 525 
Jaffna, 85 

Jaggery (Palm sugar), 82 
Jamber or Djember, 198 
Jambi (Jamby), 135-6, 153, 154 , 
157, 164, 185, 268 
Jambu-Ayer, 139 
Jampon, see Japan 
Janapanapatatiam, see Jaffna 
Jangoma, 109-11 
Janjira, 48 
Janssen, Leon, 536 
Janssonius, Joannes, 107 
Jao (Measure of distance), xcv, 301-3 
Jaoas, lxxxi 

Japan (Jampon), 1 , lxi, Ixiv, lxx, 
lxxii, lxxvi, 5, 47, 1x8, 128, 130, 
131, 222, 524 
Japanese, 128 

Japara, xciv, 151-2, 157, 159, 160, 

166, 170, 186, 187-9, 224, 521, 528 
Japura, 166, 183-4 

Jaty wood (Teak), 145 
Java (Jaaoa), xxiv— xxvi, lxxiii, lxxv, 
Ixxviii-lxxxiv, xciv, 45, 97, 102, 
no, 115, 118-9, 134. 136, 145, 
154-60, 166-79, 195, 201-4, 206-7, 
220, 224-7, 230-2, 239-46, 248, 
250, 253, 266, 268, 274-5, 282-5, 
287, 305 , 5 i 3 , 521-2, 528 
Javanese, 122-3, 142, 15 L 1 54 , 157 , 

167, 173, 175-80, 199-200, 206, 
214, 227, 229-30, 232, 237, 245, 
2 55, 265, 280, 282-3, 288 

Javanese map, lxxviii 
Javanese pilots, lxxix 
Jebel Manhali (Dabiam), 291 
Jebel Teir (Ceybam), 292, 295 
Jebongon, 522 
Jeilolo, see Gillolo 
Jelba, lxxxv 
Jelly Paud, 75 


Jerusalem, 8, 80, 525 
Jesters, 72 
Jesuits, 1 , lvii, lx, lxi 
Jewellers, 86 
Jews, 27 

Jidda (Juda), 9, n, 12-7, 18, 19, 269 
Jmdus, see Indus 
Jogee, 36 

John II, King of Portugal, xxi, xxvii, 
Ixii, 277 

John III, King of Portugal, xvi 

John the Writer, 57 

Johor River, 25 1 

Johore, State, 259 

Jones, J. W., 539 

Jowaur or Juar, 44 

Jrcam, see Rokan 

Jubilee, 12, 18 

Juda, see Jidda 

Judea, 9, 10, 19 

Juggurnaut, 92 

Jumaia, 227 

Junkseylon (Juncalom), 105 
Junquileu (PWei-ch’iieh-lou), lv- 
lvii, lix 

Jurupa Galacam Jmteram, 196 

Kabul, 33 
Kadalur Point, 75 
Kaffa, 525 
Kahan, see Cahon 
Kahwat Arafat, 1 1 
Kaimals (Caimaes), 70, 74, 79-81, 
82 

Kalhat (Calahate), 15 
Kali Brantas, 196-7 
Kali Mas, 196 
Kalinadi or Liga River, 55 
Kalinga (Talingo), 65, 66, 76-7, 
Kallayi River or Calicut Creek, 75 
Kalutara (Cali tore), 86 
Kamaran (Camaram), lxxxv, 9, 17, 
292-5 

Kambing (Lucucamby), 200-2 
Kammerer, F. Albert, 530 
Kampar (Campar), 135-6, I 5 °* 2 > 
153, 156, 164, 222-3, 243-6, 248, 
250-4, 262, 263, 280-2, 285, 287- 
9 > 52 i 

Kampengpet or Kamphengphet 
(Capemtit), 109-10 



INDEX 


558 

Kanara, Ixiv, lxx-lxxii, 48, 60-3, 

64-6, 77 

Kanarese (Canarijs or Canarins), 
lxxxiv, 60, 61, 63, 65; Language, 
60, 64, 77 

Kandavangan, 225 
Kaniyans (Canacos), 72 
Kanniramukker River, 75 
Kapal Island, 205 
Kappatta (Capocar), 74, 75, 78, 268 
Karachi, 33, 38 
Karikal (Carecall), 271 
Karimun (Carjmom or Caryman), 
136, 150, 156, 233, 269, 301 
Kasang (Cagam), 279 
Kasaragod, 75 
Kashis, 16, 280 
Kashmir, 46 
Kasiruta Island, 218 
Kateman River, 152, 156 
Kathiawar, 33 

Kattakulam (Coty Coulam), 74-5, 
77 

Kawula, lxxxi 
Kayal, see Old Kayal 
Kayankulam (Caya Coulam), 74-6, 
80, 83 

Kedah (Quedaa), 2, 45, 105, 106-7, 
108-10, 139, 144, 147, 243, 248, 
259-60, 268, 273, 284, 514 
Kediri, 190 

Kelantam (Clamtam), 105 
Kelor, 187 

Kelve Mahim, see Mahim 
Khan, 52 
Kharak, 38 

Kharepatan (Carapatani), in Cam- 
bay, 38 

Kharepatan (Carapatanam), in Dec- 
can, 48, 49, 54 
Khawarij, 25 

Khoja Hasan, Laksamana, 256 
Khorasan (Cora^oni), 22, 34 
Khorasans, 34, 42, 46, 170 
Kiang-mai, 109 

Kiangsu or Chiang-su, lv, lviii, lix 
Kilakari (Calicate), 271 
Kilwa (Qujlloa), 14, 43, 46, 268 
Kimble, George H. T., lxxv 
King, J. S., 48 
King-Men, 120 


Kistna River, 64-5 
Klang (Clam)., 260-1 
Klings (Quelijs), 2, 4, 53, 64-5, 78, 
84, 92, 95, 104, 133, 142, i 44 » l6l > 
182, 186, 249, 255, 267-8, 271-3, 
275, 281, 283 
KlongTrang, 105 
Koh Ta kut, 106 
Kole Kole, 210 

Kollam-Pantalayini (Coulam-Pam- 
daranj), 74, 75.78, 271 
Komba, see Batu Tara 
Komber (Comber), 205 
Komodo, 228 
Kondulika River, 48 
Konkani, 54 
Kopke, Diogo, 534 
Korea, 524 
Koreans, 128 
Kota Baru (Borneo), 225 
Kota Bharu (Malay Peninsula), 105 
Kotame, lxxxv 
Kotri, see Crodi 
Kottayam, 74, 77 
Koyer or Kohir (Queher), 49, 50 
Kranganur, Cranganur or Cran- 
ganor (Cramganor), lxix, 74-6, 79, 

83, 513 

Kraton River, 1 97 
Krawang, Cape, lxxxiv, 172, 528 
Kris, 93, 174, 179, 191, 200, 227, 266 
Krung Raya Bay, 138 
Kshatriyas (Chatrias), 67, 68 
Kuala Kesang (Acoala Ca^am), 259- 
60 

Kuala Lingi, see Acoala Penajy 

Kuala Muar, 260 

Kuala Ayer Lebu, see Aeilabu 

Kuala Larut, 105 

Kuala Pedir, 139 

Kualu River, 148 

Kuang-chou-fu (Cancheufu); Fac- 
tory, xlii; Prison, xli 
Kulao Re (Rai), 302 
Kulbarga (Quellberga), 49-51 
Kumbla (Combula), 74, 77 
Kundapur or Coondapur, 60-1 
Kundur (Sabam), Ixxx, lxxxiii, 136, 
150, 156 

Kuria Muria (Curia Muria), 19, 520 
Kusavans (Cuiavem), 72 



INDEX 


Kuta Raja, 138 

Kutb-ul-Mulk (Cupall Mullc), 50, 
5i 

Kutei, 225 

Kwaja Attar (Cojatar), 62 
Kwaja Mukaddan, 50 
Kwang-si (Cansi or Quansi), 1 
Kwang-tung, xxxviii 

Lac, 17, 43, 46, 108, 1 1 1-2, 277 
La^ari, see El Qoseir 
Laccadive Islands, 520 
Lada, 76 

Lagoa, Viscount de, xii, 224, 537 
Lakon (Lugor), 105, 106, 109-10, 
112 

Laksamana, see Lasamane 
Lambry, 135-7, 138, 163 
Lamedares, 207 
Lampacau, liii 
Lamreh, 138 
Lanacaqe, see Nailaka 
Lancarias, 1 56 

Landesbibliothek, Weimar, 531 
Lanha (Coconut water), 69 
Lansium domesticum, 156 
Lantea, lv 
Laos, 109 
Lapis-lazuli, 515 

Largo de Santo Antonio da Se, xxii 
Lasamane or Lasemana, 108, 126, 
235, 244, 248, 249, 253, 255-8, 
264-5, 266, 270, 280 
Laue, 132, 172, 187-8, 223-5, 268, 
27S 

Laval, Pyrard de, 77, 80, 133, 537 
Lavanha, Joao Baptista, 89, 155, 
158, 160, 168, 170, 190, 198, 521 
Lead, 93, 96-7, 108 
League, Portuguese, 121-2, 165-6, 
214, 217-8, 222, 259, 299-30i> 
302-3, 517, 519, 521, 525, 527 
Leather, 44 
Lebanon, 525 
LebeU^a, 183 

Lei chou Peninsula, 120, 523 
Lei-K’ioung Tao or Lei-ch’iung 
Tao, 120 

Leiria, Ines de, xlix, li, liii— lv, lix, 
lxii 

Leite, Duarte, 519, 537 


559 

‘Lembra^a de Cousas da India 
em 1525’, 170, 537 
Leme, Henrique, 172 
Lemons, 92 

Length, Measures of, see Measures 
Lequeos or Lequios, lxiv, 126-7, 
243, 265, 268, 523-5, see Liu Kiu 
Ley, Charles David, xii 
Leyden, John, 537 
Liampo, liii 

Library of the National Assem- 
bly, Paris, xiii, xv 
Lide, 135-6, 13 9, *4* 

Liga (Aliga), 54-5 

Lignaloes, Apothecary’s, 29, 118, 
123, 136, 148, 150, 153-4, 156-7, 
160-x, 263, 270, 287, see Calambac 
Lima, D. Manuel, 224 
Lin-mun, 120, 523 
Lin Tin Island, see Turnon 
Linga (Lingua), 136, 147, 153-4, 
156-7, 223, 250, 264, 266, 268, 
521 

Linschoten, Jan Huygen van, 219, 
537 

Lions, 235-6 

Liquidambar orientalis Mill., see 
Storax, Liquid 

Liu Kiu, xxxiv, lxiv, lxx, lxxii, 5, 93, 
xi8, 126, 128-31, 192, see Lequeos 
‘Livro de Marinharia’, Ixxiii, 
lxxxii, 39, 75-6, 137, 139, 145, 
150, 171, 201, 204, 211, 271-2, 
526, 537 

Lobo, A. de Sousa Silva Costa, 277, 
537 

Locary, see Losari 
Loeb, Edwin M., 537 
Lomblen, lxxxii, 204, 526 
Lopes, David, xx, 77, 537 
Lopes, Diogo, xix, xxii, xxv 
Lopes, Dr. Diogo, xxiii 
Lopes, Joao Baptista da Silva, xv 
Losari (Locary), 166, 183 
Loyola, St. Ignatius of, xv 
Lucardie, M. J. C., 138 
Lombok (Bombo, i.e., Lombo), 
lxxxi, 200-2, 305, 523, 527-8 
Lon tar (Bomtar), 205 
Loochoo Islands, see Liu Kiu 
Loos, 126 



INDEX 


560 

Lucipara (Lusuparam, Lusopino or 
Gilimao) (Banda Sea), lxxx-lxxxiv 
Lucipara (Luceparij) (Banka Strait), 
157-8 

Lu£oes or Llucoes (Philippines), 
xxvi, lxx, s, 121, 128, 133-5, 261, 
265, 268, 281, 283, see Luzons 
Lucucamby, see Kambing 
Lugor, see Lakon 

Luis, Lazaro, 120, 129-30, 133, 138, 
155,222,531 

Lusitanian, 3 

Lusopino, lxxxi, see Lucipara 
Lusuparam, lxxx, see Lucipara 
Luzon, 133, 522 
Luzons (Lusoes), 132, 223, 226 
Lynam, Edward, xi, xii 

Ma Huan, 140, 303 
Macao, lxi 
Ma$aram, 10 
Macareo, see Bore 
Mafaris, 10, 34 

Macassar (Maca^ar), 156, 172, 220, 
223, 226-7, 283, 522 
Macassars (Macaceres), lxx, 5, 226 
Mace, 16, 43, 56, 93, 99, 108, 
159, 204-5, 206-8, 241, 270, 272, 
277 

Machado, Diogo Barbosa, xvi, xxi, 
lxix, 537 

Mackay, Graham, xii 
Mac Leod, N., 197, 537 
Macobumj, 167 
Macuas, see Mukkuvans 
Madafarxa, see Muzaffar Shah (King 
of Malacca) 

Madaforxa (Coin), 36 
Madaforxa, Sultan of Cambay, see 
Muzaffar Shah II 
Madagascar, 290, 520 
Madalena (Ship), xl 
Madayid (Marlarjanj), 74-5, 77 
Madder, 17, 43, 269 
Madeira, see Madura 
Madeira Island (Atlantic), lxxxvii, 
290, 520 
Madraka, 513 
Madras, 63-4, 126, 272 
Madrid, 202 

Madrolle, Claude, 120, 537 


Madura (Madeira), lxxxi, lxxxii, 
160, 166, 172, 193, i97, 223, 226, 
227-8, 268, 523 
Mafacalou, lxxxvii 
Mafamede, see Mohammed 
Mafamud, see Mahmud Shah, Sul- 
tan of Cambay 

Mafamut, see Mahmud Shah, King 
of Malacca 
Maffei, G., 1 

Magadoxoo, see Mogadishu 
Magellan, Ferdinand, 133, 201-2, 
213, 224 

Magnaghi, Alberto, 530 
Maguhare, 86 
Mahamadi River, 91 
Mahamud Xaa, see Mahmud Shah, 
King of the Deccan 
Mahanadi River, 65 
Mahe, 75 

Mahim or Kelve Mahim (Maymj), 
33,34,48 

Mahim or Mahikavati (Maimbij), 
34,38,39 

Mahmud Shah, King of the Dec- 
can, 50-1 

Mahmud Shah (Mafamut), King of 
Malacca, xxxviii, xliv, lvi, 194, 
252-9, 280-1, 289 

Mahmud Shah, Sultan of Cambay, 
36 

Mahmud Shah, Sultan of Pahang, 
251-2 

Maidas or Mayda Island, 519, 529 
Mailapur, 272 
Maimbij, see Mahim 
Mainates, see Vannathamars 
Maindis, 207, 208 
Maise, 44 
Maitaram, no 
Majapahit, 174, 185 
Major, Richard Henry, li, 538 
Makyan (Maqujem or Maqiem), 
213,217-8 

Malabar, lxiv, lxix, lxxi, lxxii, 2, 4, 
13, 17, 20, 42, 45, 60, 62, 64, 65- 
84, 272, 512-4, 516 
Malabars, lxxxiv, 53, 85, 268, 271-2, 
279, 283, 

Malacca, xix-xxxi, xxxiv-xxxvi, 
xxxviii, xii, xliii, xliv, xlvi, xlvii, 



INDEX 


56 l 


Malacca — cont. 

lv, lx, Ixii, lxiv-lxvi, lxix, lxx, 
lxxii-lxxvi, lxxix-lxxxv, lxxxix, 
xci, xciv, 2, 17, 21, 42-7, 53. 92-4. 
96-101, 103-8, no, 1 13-9, 123, 
128-34, 137, 139, 142-7, 149-56, 
158-9, 162-5, 167, 169-72, 179- 
81, 183-8, 193-6, 203-4, 212-5, 
223-6, 228, 229-89, 291, 301-2, 
512, 514, 53 °-i, 523, 525-6, 532; 
Ambassadors, 238-9; Arrival of 
the Portuguese in 1509, 235-6, 
254-7; Attack by Pate Unus in 
1512, 1 5 1-2, 188, 282; Boundaries, 
259-60; Early history, 229-59; 
Fortress, 237, 280-1; Its import- 
ance, lxxiv-lxxv, 283, 285-7; Mos- 
que, 249, 281; Native administra- 
tion, 264-8; Origin of name, 234; 
Portuguese occupation, 278-89; 
River, 233-4; Seizure by the Portu- 
guese, xciv, 278—81; Settlement of 
Malacca, 259;Trade, 268-78, 283-7 
Malay Annals, 229, 537 
Malay Pilots, lxxix 
Malaya, xciii, 13, 137, 145, 522 
Malayans or Malays, 47, 108, 122-3, 
130-1, i34, 142, i47, i54. 199, 
206, 214, 227, 260-1, 264-8, 273, 
279-83, 289 
Malaysia, 44 

Maldives (Diua or Diva), lxxxvii, 
53, 82, 84, 94-5, 100, 162, 169-70, 
268-9 

Maldonado, Francisco Herrera, lxi 

Malhou, 134 
Malik, 52 

Malik ’Aiyaz (Melique Az), lxv, 
lxvi, 34-5 

Malik Dastur or Malik Dinar Das- 
tur-i Mamalik (Miliqui Dastur), 
50-1 

Malike (Malaqi), 24 
Malindi (Melimde), 14, 43, 46, 268, 
520 

Malpe or Mulpi River, 61 
Malua, lxxxi, 204, see Solor 
Maluqo, see Moluccas 
Malwa Plateau, 36 
Mamalle Mercar, 77-8 
Mamdaliqua (Governor), 261 


Mamelukes, 10 
Mamgallor, see Mangalore 
Manali River, 38 
Manar (Manna), 38 
Manawoka, 209 
Mancopa, see Melabah 
Mandarin, 235 

Mandelika Island (Mandalica), 

157, 528 

Mandioli Island, 218 
Mandu or Mandogarh (Mandao), 
36,37, 514-6 
Maneco Bumj, 288-9 
Mangalore (Mamgallor), 60-2, 65-6, 
73, 513-4, 5i6 
Mangos teen, 137 
Manicas (Rubies), 275, 516 
Manicopa (i.e. Mancopa), 142, see 
Melabah 

Manjeshvar or Manjeshwaram 
(Mayceram), 65, 74, 75-7 
Mannari Island, 76 
Mansur Shah (Mansursa), King of 
Malacca, 194, 246-50, 252 
Mantaz, 86 

Manuel I, King of Portugal, xvi, xix, 
xxi, xxv, xxvi, xxix, xxxi, xxxiii, 
xxxv, xxxvi, xxxix, xlii, xliii, xlvii, 
lxv, lxxii, lxxiii, lxxviii, lxxix, 
Ixxxv-lxxxviii, xcvi, 1-6, 207, 220, 
277, 512 

Manuel, D. Nuno, xl, 1 
Manzi, lvii 

Map ‘c. 1471’ (Modena), 519, 529 
Map c. 1510 (Wolfenbuttel), 75, 
529-30 

Map c. 1523 (Turin), 132, 202, 213, 
530 

Map c. 1540 (Wolfenbuttel), 106-7, 
113, 119, 138, 146, 149, 155, 160, 
202, 21 1, 213, 221-4, 226, 531 
Maps, see Appendixes II and III 
Maqujem, see Makyan 
Marapalaguj, 164 
Marash Kermanig, 525 
Marca, Ponta, see Tiger Point 
Markham, Sir Clements, 538 
Marlarjanj, see Madayid 
Marsden, William, lxi, lxxvii, 101, 
1x8, 138, 162, 244, 247, 254, 266, 
283,288, 538 


Y 


H.C.S. II. 



INDEX 


562 

Martaban (Martamane), 94, 98-102, 
io 5> 283 
Martara, 105-6 
Martin Vaz, Island, 520 
Maruz Minhac, see Nias 
Mascarenhas, Bishop D. Fernando 
Martins, xv 

Mascarenhas, Jorge de, xxix— xxxi, 
xxxiv 

Mascarenhas, Pero de, xxvi 

Mascate, see Muscat 

Masirah or Mosera (A Maseira), 14, 

19 

Masons, 72 

Massawa (Me^ua), lxxxv, lxxxvi, 
295 , 5 i 7 

Mastamude, 36 
Mastic, 13,518 
Mataleni, 48-9 

Matamingos, 16, see Glass beads 
Mate, 169, 170, 1 80- 1, 275-6 
Maticalab, see Batticaloa 
Mauro, Fra, 98, 119, 529 
Mausambi, xcii 
Mayajerij, see Myohaung 
Mayceram, see Manjeshvar 
Mayers, F. J., lvii 
Mayers, W. F., xxxii, lii 
Maymj, Maymi or May, see Mahim 
or Kelve Mahim 
Mayporam, 74, 77 
Maz, 94, 124, 145, 267, 275-6 
McCrindle, J. W., 37, 537 
Measures, 86, 95, 99-101, 124, 144, 
181, 275-8. — CAPaciTY, see Ca- 
nada, Ganta, Mercal, Quartilho, 
Tom. — Length, see Jao, League. 
— Weight, see Arroba, Arratel, 
Bahar, Cate, Cumderi, Cupom, 
Dachim, Dram, Fara^ola, Maz, 
Paual, Piquo, Tael, Tiqua, Tun- 
daia, Vi^a 
Meat, 44 

Mecca, lxvi, 8, 9, 11, 12-6, 18-9, 24, 
26, 78, 250-1, 253, 268-9, 272, 
288, 290, 514; Strait of, 8, 43, 290, 
514-5, see Red Sea 
Mecca-grass, 514 
Me£ua, see Massawa 
Medadaue, see Ahmadabad 
Medan (Medina), 141 


Media, 21-2 

Medici Atlas (135 0 , 56, 5 2 9 
Medicine in Malabar, 69 
Medina (Almedina), 11, 24 
Medina (In Sumatra), see Medan 
Mediterranean, 3, 7, 9, 1 9 » 3 ° 5 ; In 
F. Rodrigues’ maps, xci, xciii, 

525-6 

Mehegan Point, 1 07 
Mehum, see Perim Island 
Mei-ling Pass, xxxviii 
Mekran, 10 

Melabah (Mancopa), 135, 136, 163 
Melaleuca leucadendron Linn., 44 
Melchites, 12 

Melique Az, see Malik ’Aiyaz 
Melo, Francisco de, xxv 
Melo, Rui de, xlvii 
Men with big ears, lxxvi, 222 
Menado, see Vdama 
Menam ChaoPhaya, 103, 105 
Menangkabau (Menancabo), 113, 
135-6, 148, 151-5, i59-6i, 163-5, 
245, 248, 263, 268, 275, 282-3; 
First European explorer, in 1684, 

113 

Mendol, 150 

Mendoza, Juan Gonzalez de, li 
Menezes, D. Aleixo de, xxxviii, xlvi 
Menezes, D. Duarte de, xxxviii 
Mentawei, 162 
Menumbing or Monopin, 155 
Mercal or Mercar, 10 1 
Mercator, Gerard, 119, 130, 202, 
224-6, 521-2 

Middle India, lxx, 5, 60, 65 
Mijam, see Minjam 
Milagobim or Miligobim, 40-2 
Milan, 130, 201 

Milique Dastur or Milic Dastur, 
see Malik Dastur 
‘Miller maps’, 530 
Millet, 11, 33,44 
Mills, J.V., 106,538 
Mimes, 177, 268 
Min River, 1 29 
Mindanao, lxxxi 
Ming Dynasty, xxxii 
Minhac Barras, see Nias 
Minjam, Mjmjam or Mijam, 107, 
134, 243, 248, 261 



INDEX 


563 


Miranda, Antdnio de, 215, 219 
Miranda, Jos6 da Costa, 106, 109-10 
Mitjan (Mjrgeu), 60-1 
Mirrors, 13 
Mium, see Perim Island 
Mj^ura, 231 
Mjdonj, 22, see Media 
Mjmjam, see Minjam 
Mjrgeu, see Mirjan 
Modafarxa, see Muzaffar Shah 
(King of Malacca) 

Mogadishu (Magadoxoo), 13-4, 43, 
46 

Mogutuara, see Maguhare 
Mohammed (Holy Prophet), 2, 8, 
11, 18, 21-2, 24-9, 3i, 53. 57-8, 
174, 191, 240, 245, 256, 286 
Mohammed Ali (Mamale), 77 
Mohammedans, 36-7, 39, 59, 66, 
78, 82, 89, 164, 182, 185, 191, 213- 
4, 217, 221, 286, see Moors 
Mohit, 141, 161-2, 271-2 
Moio, 201, 527 
Mojeidi, 295 
Mollah, 182, 240-2, 280 
Moluccas (Maluqo), lxvi, lxvii, 
lxxix-lxxxiv, 44-5, 47, 1 18, 132, 
134, 136, 157, 174, 193-4. 203-4, 
207-9, 212-22, 226, 228, 265, 268- 
9, 274, 282, 286-7, 516 
Molvediro, 514 
Mombassa, 14, 46 
Momte Synaa, see Mount Sinai 
Money, see Coinage and Coins 
Mongols (Moguors), 128 
Monomby, 136, 155, 157, 185, 223 
Moors, 1, 2, 8, 14, 22-9, 31-2, 34-5, 
4°. 5°. S3, 56-8, 62, 78, 82, 84, 
87-8, 104, 1 14, 132, 137, 139, 142- 
3, 147-8, 150, IS4-5, i57, 161, 165, 
173-4, i7&-7> *79, 182, 190, 198, 
206-7, 212-4, 228, 237-45, 248-9, 
253, 268, 270, 281, 286-7, 293-5, 
514; Charts of the, 21 1; Marriage 
dowry, 267; Marry heathens, 243, 
268 

Mormugao, 55 

Morotai or Morti (Mor), 216, 221 
Mosera, see Masirah 
Mosques, 182, 249, 281 
Mosto, Andrea da, 224, 538 

Y 2 


Motages, lxvi, see Nodhakis 
Motir (Motei), 213, 214, 217 
Moule, A. Christopher, xii, xxxiii, 
lvi, lvii, 1 1 6 , 118-9, 121, 125-8, 

303 , 538 

Mount Carmel, Our Lady of, 525 
Mount Dely, 75 
Mount Formosa, 243 
Mount Sinai (Momte Synaa), 8 
Moyo, see Moio 
Mozambique, 169, 290 
Muar Damboino, lxxxi, 210, see 
Ceram 

Muar River, 232-5, 243-4, 259-62, 
281-2 

Muara, 164 

Muara Tangerang, 17 1 

Mucua and Mucuar, see Muk- 

kuvans 

Mudhaffar Shah, 36, see Muzaffar 
Shah II, Sultan of Cambay 
Mudzafar Shah, see Muzaffar Shah, 
King of Malacca 

Muhammad Iskandar Shah (Xa- 
quem Darxa), King of Malacca, 

236, 237-43 

Mukkuvans (Macuas), 67, 72, 81, 

85 

Mules, 1 18 
Muli River, 17 1 
Mullaitivu, 85 
Mummers, 177 
Mummy, 9, 515 
Muntiacus, 236-7 
Muria Mountains, 187-8 
Murviedro, 514 
Muscat (Mascate), 15 
Museo di Strumenti Antichi, 
Florence, 531 
Musi River, 154 
Musicians, 72 

Musk, 16-7, 21, 29, 43, 96, 98, hi, 
124, 125-6, 130, 270, 275-7 
Muslin, 58, 108, 125 
Mustard, 98 

Muzaffar Shah (Modaforxa or 
Madaforxa), King of Malacca, 
139, *94, 242-7, 252 
Muzaffar Shah II, Sultan of Cam- 
bay, 35-6; Brought up in poison, 40 
Myohaung (Mayajerij), 95-6 

H.C.S.II 



INDEX 


5 6 4 

Myrobalans, 82, 83, 92, 132, 277, 
514, see Belleric, Chebulic, Citrine, 
Emblic 
Myrrh, 9, 515 

Nabucodonosor, 23 
Nagapatam, see Negapatam 
Nagore (Naor), 84, 91-2, 271 
Nailaka (Lanacaqe), 205-6 
Nails, 269 
Naires, see Nayars 
Naitaques, see Nodhakis 
Nakano-shima, 129 
Naku Archipelago, 1 62 
NambuShoto, 129 
Nambudiris or Nambutiris, 68 
Nan-chang, lxiii 

Nan-t’ou (Nantoo or Nanto), xxxi, 
xxxii, 1 19, 121-2, 123-4 
Nanking (Namqim), xxxviii, xbi, 
xlvii, xlix, liv— lvii, bdi, lxiii, 126—7 
Narasinha, Prince, 63 
Narham, 291 

Narsinga, bdv, box, lxxii, 20-1, 36, 
48, Si, 54 , 58, 60-2, 63-5, 66, 76, 
91, 96, 272-3, 512-4 
Nautical Rules, 295—301, 303—5 
Naviote, 194 

Nayars (Naires), box, 67-72, 74, 78 
Negapatam (Nagapatam), 64, 91-2, 
101, 169, 271 

Negombo (Nygumbo), 85-6, 517 

Negri Sembilan, 259 

Neira, 205-6 

Nellore, see Cultarey 

New Goa, 54, 55, see Goa 

New Guinea, 1 18, 208 

New Rome (Constantinople), 22 

New Spain, lxxx 

Nias (Maruz Minhac), 161-2 

Nicobar Islands, 520, 522 

Nigella, 46 

Nigella sativa Linn., 46 
Nile, lxx, 4, 14, 17, 525; Floods, 7-9 
Nileshwar or Nileshweram (Njli- 
poram), 74-5, 77 

Ninachatu, xxvi, 254, 258, 281, 283, 
287-9 

Nizam-ul-Mulk (Niza Malmulk), 
5 °, 51 , 53 

Njliporam, see Nileshwar 


Njllo, see Nile 

Nodhakis (Naitaques), lxiv, 1,4, 19, 

21,31-2,513-14 

Nore or Lory Parrot, xcii, 209 
Noronha, D. Garcia de, xxiii, xxiv 
North Cape (Celebes), 222 
Nouday, xlii 

Noutaques, box, see Nodhakis 
Noutaques, Rio dos ( ? Dasht River), 
3i 

Nucalao, see Nusa Laut 
Nuces Indiae (Coconut), 82 
Nunes, Antonio, 21, 96-7, 99, 101, 
181, 275, 538 

Nusa Laut (Nucalao), 210-12 
Nusa Raja, see Raja Island 
Nusaramgeti, Jlba, see Rusa Lin- 
guette 

Nutmeg, 16, 43, 86, 93, 99, 108, 1 14, 
123, 206, 207, 241, 270, 272, 277 
Nuts, 24 

Nygumbo, see Negombo 
Ocoloro, 162 

Odia, 103, 106, 109, see Ayuthia 
Odia or Orissa, 65 
Odoric, Friar, 120, 138, 200 
O Galao (Adunare and Kawula), 
lxxxi 

Oils, 43-4, 98, 137, 162, 278, 513, 
517-8 

Okban, lxxxv 
Old Goa, 54-5, see Goa 
Old Kayal (Qaile or Caile), 64, 81, 
271-2, 513, 517 

Oliveira, Gongalo de, lxxix, lm 
Olo Muku, xcii 
Olu, see Ub 
Olutatam, 205 
Oma, see Haruku 
Omar, 24 
Ombai Island, 202 
Ombi Island, 218 
Onions, 98, 130, 156, 287 
Onor, see Honawar 
Oparaa (Uparat), no 
Ophir, Mount, 163 
Opium (Afiam or Anfiao), 8, 9, 13, 
16-7, 43, 89, 93, 108, 115, 251, 
269-70, 277, 513; Theban opium, 

9 



INDEX 


565 


Opoponax, 515 

Oquem or Foquem (Fukien), 127, 
130 

Oranges, 92 
Oraos, 58 

Oraqua, Orraqua, Oraca or Orraca, 
107, 132, 260-2 

Orissa (Orixa, Rixia), 2, 4, 36, 63-5, 
89, 91, 92, 94-5, 224, 268, 273, 
513-4; City of Orissa (Cuttack), 
9C 523 

Ormuz, xxxv, lxiv, lxxii, lxxiv, x , 1 o, 
14-7, 23, 29-31, 42, 46, 

54, 57-8, 62, 245, 268-9, 272, 275, 
29C 5i4, 5i7, 520 

Ormuz, Strait of (Persian Gulf), 
lxvi, 14-5, 19-21; Size, 30, 517 
Orpiment, 13 , see Azernefe 
Orraqua or Orraca, see Oraqua 
Orta, Garcia da, xviii, lxxvii, 9, 22, 
44, 4 6 -7, 50, 54, 69, 83, 95, 1x8, 
156,219, 223,538 
Ortata or Gt. Waling, 205 
Ortelius, Abraham, 130, 224 
Os, see Hos 
Osiria, see Syria 

Osorio, D. Jeronimo, xv, xvi, xxviii, 
xxx, lxxi, 308, 327, 538 

Othman, 24 

Our Lady, Belief that the Hindus 
worshipped, 39 
Ouro, Ilhas do, 163 
Oxen, 15, 177, 180, 200 
Oxford English Dictionary, 125 
Oya Kampengpet (Aja Capetit), 109 
Oya Socotay (Vya Chacotay), 1 10 

Pa^ee, see Pase 

Pachak, 43-4, 46-7, 108, 114, 123, 

169,270,277 

Pacham, see Bachian 
Pacharil, Rice, 62 
Pacheco, Antdnio, xxx 
Pacheco, Diogo, 163 
Pacheco, Duarte, see Pereira, Duarte 
Pacheco 

Pa$o da Ribeira, lxix 
Padroes (Stone pillars), Java, 172; 
Pase, 144 

Paduca Raja, 244, 264 
Pagode (Coin), 58 


Paguere, 76 

Pahang (Pahao), 2, 103-5, 108-10, 
113. 147, 153, 155, 157, 163, 195, 
227-8, 243-4, 246, 248-53, 263, 
266, 268, 274-5, 280-3, 285, 514 
Pajajaran, 168, 172 
Pajarakan (Pajurucam), 166, 197, 
198 

Palanghi River, 1 64 
Palawan, 224, 523 
Palayakayal, see Old Kayal 
Pale, Palee or Paula (Vpale), 54-5 
Paleacate see Pulicat 
Palembang (Palimbam), lxxx, 108, 
no, 135-7, 147, 151 , I54"6, 157- 
8, 172, 185-6, 188, 195, 226, 230- 
4, 239, 249, 262, 264-5, 268, 274, 
282 

Palestine, 10, 14 

Palinarus Shoal (Ilheos de Cana- 
canim), 520 

Pali mas, Cabo das, see Albina Point 
Palm sugar, 82 
Palma Christi, 69 
Palmares, Rio dos, see Shebar En- 
trance 

Palmela, 291 
Paloe, see Raja Island 
Pamban Island, 76 
Pamdaranj, see Pantalayini 
Pamgam, 522 
Pamgoray, 105, 106, no, 

Pamuca (Pamukan or Pamkan), 132, 
223,225, 522 
Pan, see Pon 

Panadure (Penotore), 85 
Panai River, 148 
Panane, see Ponnani 
Panarukan (Panarucam), 196, 197, 
198 

Panawa, 85 
Pancaldo, Leone, 133 
Panchavilizes, 114, 133, 204, 216 
Panchur or Pansur, 134-6, 148, 155, 
1 60-1, 164, 170, 180, 272, see 
Baros 

Pangajava, 98, 134, 155, 169, 186, 
188-9, x 92, 194-6, 224-5, 227, 
269 

Pangeran Tranggana, 174 
Pangim, 55 



INDEX 


566 

Panicum miliaceum Zi«n., 44 
Panjang Island (Banda Sea), 209 
Panjang Island (Java), 187 
Pansur, see Panchur 
Pantalayini (Pamdaranj), 74, 78 
Pantar, 526 
Pao-an, 121-2 
Paoying, lvii 
Paper, 130 
Paper-bark-tree, 44 
Papos (Pods of musk), 96 
Papua, 208, 209, 222 
Papuans with big ears, lxxvi, 222 
Paragua, 129 

Parami9ura, 158, 163,231-8 
Parami9ure, 231-2 
Parao, hi, 148-50, 163, 203, 214, 
217-8, 221, 226, 228, 250, 261-2, 
264, 279 

Parappanangadi (Para Purancorj), 
74 , 75, 78 

Parayans (Pareos), 72 
Pardao, 58 

Parioco, see Parpoquo 
Parit Point or Tanjong Parit, 149, 
302 

Parker, E. H., 141, 538 
Parpoquo, Island, 524-5 
Parrots, 11 8 , 216, 219 
Parsees, 22, 88, 174, 182, 240, 249, 
255, 268-9, 273, 281, 283 
Pase (Pa9ee), xxix, xxx, lxxii, 42, 45, 
88-9, 92-3, 96, 98-9, i°4, i°7, 
109-10, 118-9, 135-4°, 142-5, 

146, 148, 163, 174, 195, 239-42, 
245-6, 265, 268, 273, 275, 282-4; 
King’s succession by murder, 143 
Pasuruan, 160, 190, 197 
Patadares, 39, see Pattars 
Patalim, Rui de Brito, lxxxii, 215 
Patamares, 39, 70, see Pattars 
Patan (? Veraval), 34, 38 
Patani (Patane), xxx, xliii, 2, 105, 
no, 232, 244, 268 

Pate or Patih, 154, 155, 158, 166, 
168, 179, 182, 190, 196, 225, 245 
Pate Acoo, 280 
Pate Adem, 1 93 
Pate Amdura or Udora, 175 
PateAmiza, 192, 195 
PateBagus, 192 


Pate Bubat, lxxiii, 196 
Pate Codia, 183 
Pate Cu9uf, i93 _ 5, 214 
Pate Mamet, 184 
PateMorob, 189, 192 
Pate Orob, 1 86-7 
PatePimtor, 180, 197-8 
PatePular, 197 

Pate Quedir (Patih Katir), 183, 2x4, 
282 

Pate Rodim, i 54 “ 5 , 183-4, J 85 » 
186-9, !92, 195 
Pate Sapetat, 197 

Pate Unus, xix, 151-2, 155, 157, 
160, 175, 184-7, 188, 189, 192, 
195, 214, 224, 282, 521, 528; 
Attacks Malacca in 1512, 151-2, 
188, 282 
Pate Vira, 189 
PateZeinall, 193, 195 
Pateudra, Pate Udora or Pate An- 
dura, 152 
Pati9a, 280 
Patola, 207, 208, 216 
Pattars, lxxi, 39, 41, 42, 68, 70 
Paual, 275 

Paulohi or Poeleh, 210 
Pavagarh, 35 
Paybou, 168 

Pazhayangadi, see Madayid 
Pearl beads, 133 
Pearl River, 121 

Pearls and Seed Pearls, 16, 20, 30, 
43-4, 86, 93, 99, X15, 120, 124-6, 
269-70, 272, 275-6, 517; Fisheries, 
20, 81, 120 
Pechabury, 106 
Pedada River, 141 
Pedir, 42, 45, 104, 107, 109-10, 
135-6, 138, 139-40, 141-2, 144-5, 
147-8, 163, 195, 268, 273, 284 
Pedra Branca, 301-2 
Pegu, lxiv, lxxii, lxxix, 2, 13, 17, 42, 
45, 84, 94“ 6 , 97-103, 104, 1 09-1 1, 
I39-4I, 144, 195, 226, 250, 265, 
268, 273, 282-5, 516, 522 
P’ei chou, Peichow or P’i chou, Iv, 
lvii-lix, see Sampitay 
P’ei hsien or Pihsien, lviii, lxiii, see 
Sampitay 

Pei-tu (T’un-m6n), 122 



INDEX 


Pei-wo, xxxi— xxxiii 
Peitaca, 283-4 

Peking (Peqim), xxxvii-xl, xlvii, 
xlix, 1, liii-lvii, lxii, lxiii, lxx, 117, 
127 

Pelliot, Paul, xxxiii, 1 19, 538 
Pemano, 1 59-60 
Penang, 107 
Pengkalen Bahru, 107 
Penner River, 91 

Pennisetum typhoideum Rich., 44 
Penotore, see Panadure 
Penrose map, 129, 133, 531 
Peperim or Pepory, 105-6, 1x0 
Pepper, 17, 21, 30, 82-3, 86, 89, 93, 
99, 107-8, 1 10-15, 1 18, 123-4, 
136, 139-41, H3-5, 158-9, 168- 
71, 272, 277, 284, 522; Long, 168, 
180, 191 

Peqim, 1 17, see Peking 
Perak (Pirac), 248, 261 
Perapat Point, 148 
Pereira, Duarte Pacheco, xviii, lxxv, 
lxxvii, 297 

Pereira, Francisco Maria Esteves, 538 
Pereira, Gonpalo, 223 
Pereira, Nuno Vaz, xxx 
Perestrelo, Bartolomeu, 289 
Perestrelo, Rafael, xxix 
Perical or Panicale, see Elephantiasis 
Perieco or Perioco, see Parpoquo 
Perim Island (Mehum, Mium or 
Vera Cruz), 291-2 

Persia, lxiv, lxviii, lxxii, lxxviii, 4, 
14, 18-20, 21-30, 31-4, 51, 58, 514 
Persian Gulf, see Ormuz, Strait of 
Persians, 22-4, 34, 46, 48, 52, 104, 
142, 161, 209; Like Germans, 30; 
Like Parisians, 22; Like Portu- 
guese, 23 

Pertandangan Point, 148 
Pescadores Islands, 525 
Pesmim, see Bassein 
Pessoa, Pero, xx, xxi 
Petherbridge, John Arnold, xii 
Phan Ri, 302 
Philippe, Father F., 532 
Philippines, lxxii, 145, 201, 523, 
see Lu^oes 

Phillips Collection, 201 
Phillips, George, lx, 303, 538 


567 

PhrachaiorPrajai, King of Siam, 109 

Phyllanthus disticus Muell., 83 
Phyllanthus Emblica Zimz., 83 
Physicians, Malabar, 69 
Picoll or Pico, see Piquo 
Pidada River, 141 
Piedade (Ship), xxiii 
Pieris, P. E., 538 

Pigafetta, Antonio, 102, 132, 162, 
201-2, 205, 213-4, 221, 224-5, 535 
Pigs, 168-9, I 8o 
Piju, lvii 

Pimpall Varaa, 33 
Pingiu, lvii 

Pinto, Fernao Mendes, xviii, xxi, 
xxii, xlii, xlix-lxi, 98, 105, 107, 
109, 1 16, 130, 145, 302-3; Dis- 
covers Japan, 13 1; Discovers Liu 
Kiu, 128-9; The Peregrinagao, li, 
liv, lvi, lix-lxi, 538; Rehabilitation, 
lx-lxi, lxxviii; In the Society of 
Jesus, lx 
Pio, see Pei-wo 
Piper BeteleLzKw., 54 
Piquo, Picoll or Pico, 94, 124 
Pirac, see Perak 
Pirada, 135-6, 139, 141-2, 144 
Pirama or Pyrama, see Priaman 
Pirats, 139, see Corsairs and Sea 
robbers 

Pires, Andr£, 299 

Pires, Tome, Account sent from 
China, xxxviii, lxiii; Ambassador 
to China, xi, xviii, xxvii-lxiii; Bio- 
graphical Note, xviii-lxiii: Sources, 
xix-xxi; Before Arrival in India, 
xxi-xxiii; In India Before Going to 
Malacca, xxiii-xxv; In Malacca, 
xxv, xxvi; Return to India and Em- 
bassy to China, xxvii-xxix; From 
Cochin to Canton, xxix-xxxii; Arri- 
val at Canton, xxxiii-xxxv; InCan- 
ton, xxxv-xxxvii; From Canton to 
Peking, xxxvii-xl; Back in Canton, 
xl-xlv; Vieira’s and Calvo’sLetters, 
xlv-xlviii; After 1524, xlviii-lv; 
Sampitay, lv-lx; Summing Up, 
lxi— lxiii; Daughter, xxii (see Leiria, 
Ines de); Facsimile signature, 517; 
Goes to Baros, 162; Letter to King 
Manuel, 512-8; see Suma Oriental 



INDEX 


568 

PiruBay, 210 

Pirus communis Linn., 190 
Pisum Sativum Linn., 49 
Pitch, 136, 146, 148, 153, 156-8, 
218, 225, 263 

Playfair, G. M. H., lviii, 538 
Pliny, 37 

Pocasser (? Chinkiang), lv, lvi 
Pochanci, see Pu-cheng-shih 
Pocock, R. I., xii, 236 
Pogson, K. M., xv 
Poison, Kings brought up on, 40 
Poleaas, see Pulayans 
Polo, Marco, lvii, lix, lx, 75, 117, 
119, 120, 126, 131, 137-8, 165, 
200, 524, 538 

Polvoreira, Ilha de, 154, see Pulo 
Berhala 

Pomdag, see Pontang 
Pon, 93,94, 124 

Pondicherry (Cunjmeyra or Conj- 
mjrj), 64, 271-2 

Pondo, 94 

Ponnani (Panane), 73-4, 79 
Pontang (Pomdam or Pomdag), 166, 
170, 17 1 
Poona, 50 
Pope Paul II, 4 
Poppies, 513 
Porali River, 38 

Porcelain, 43, 93, 98, 115, 125, 130, 
270 

Porim (? Purim), 248 
Port Neira, 206 

Porta da Madalena (Porta do Ferro 
or Porta da Consola^ao), xxii, lxii 
Portuguese, 23, 69, 130,255,257,288 
Pottery, 43-4, 92, ”5 
Powder, in China, x 1 5 
Poyohya, 109 

Pra^a do Comercio, xxii, lxii 
Prechayoa, King of Siam, 109 
Precious Stones, 17, 85-6, 98, 101, 
hi, 250, 516; In privy parts, 104; 
In rings, 1 1 5 
Preserves, 62, 92 
Prestage, Edgar, xii, xvii 
Prester John, lxxxvi, 515 
Priaman (Pirama), 135-6, 155, I S 9 > 
160, 161-2, 164, 167, 171 
Prince Henry the Navigator, 297 


Principe Island, 520 
Probolonggo, 197 
Propaganda Fide, Roma, 531 
Prunus domestica LxVm., 102 
Ptolomy, 5 

Pu-cheng-shih (Puchancij or Poch- 
anci), xxxii, xxxiii, xii, xlii 
Pucho, 43, 47, see Pachak 
Puda£arj, 512 
Pude, see Sapudi 

Pudopatanam, see Puthupattanam 
Puglie, 525 
Pulata, xxx 

Pulayans or Polehas (Poleaas), 71-2 
Pulicat (Paleacate), 64, 76, 82, 86, 
91-2, 271-3, 283-5 
Pulo Aee, see Ai or Aij Island 
Pulo Banda (Pullo Bamdam), 205 
Pulo Bengkalis, 149, 302 
Pulo Berhala (Pullo Baralam or 
Berella), 136, 154, 157 
Pulo Bomcagy, 205-6 
Pulo Buaya, see Buaya 
Pulo Canton (Cotom), 302 
Pulo Condore, xxx, 301-2 
Pulo Cotom, see Pulo Canton 
Pulo Durei, 1 50 
Pulo Gomes, 1 38 
Pulo Laut, 225, 522 
Pulo Padang, 302 
Pulo Param, 301-2 
PuloPisang (Pulo Pi9am), 136, 156, 
253 , 3 ° 1-2 

Pulo Rud, see Run Island 
Pulo Rupat, 149, see Rupat 
Pulo Singkep, 153-4 
Pulo Tingi (Tymge), 301 
Pulo Tioman (Vioma), 301 
Pulo Turnon, see Turnon 
Pulo Upeh, see Upeh 
Pulo Wahu, 1 50 
Pumpkins, 92 
Punjab, 39, 46 
Punul, Sacred thread, 68, 70 
Puon, 181 
Purava, 133 
Puri, 92 

Purim, 135, 149, 151, 262 
Puthupanam or Puthupattanam 
(Pudopatanam), 74-5, 78 
Putri, Queen, 163 



INDEX 


569 


Qaile, see Old Kayal 
Qato, 1 17, see Canton 
Qoay, see Haruku 
Quamtom, see Canton 
Quansi, see Kwang-si 
Quartilho, 101, 181 
Quarto, 100 
Quedaa, see Kedah 
Quedomdoam, 132, 223, 225 
Queher, see Koyer 
Quelijs, see Klings 
Quellberga, see Kulbarga 
Quesechama, 127 
Quete, 71 

Quicksilver, 13, 43, 86, 93, 98, 108, 

1 1 1-2, 269, 277 

Quilon (Coulam), 66, 73-4, 80, 81, 
83,87 

Quinces, 92 

Quinchell, see Singkel 

Qujlloa, see Kilwa j 

Quryat (Curiate), 15 

Raas (Raz) Island, lxxxii, 528 
Racao or Racam, see Arakan 
Rachado, Cape, 259 
Rachull, see Raichur 
RadenHusen, 185 
Raden Patah, 185, see Pate Rodim 
Radford, Pamela Joan, xii 
Rafadis, z8, 25 

Raffles, Sir Thomas Stamford, 174, 

185, 538 

Raichur (Rachull), 49, 50 
Raisins, 17, 43, 269 
Raja Abdullah (Raja Audela), King 
of Kampar, 254 
Raja Bandar, 164 
Raja Baya, King of Java, 230 
Raja Bon^o or Buus, 164 
Raja Bunco, 254 

RajaQaleman (Sulayman), 251-2 
Raja Qunci Teras, 164 
Raja Island or Nusa Raja, xcii, 202, 
526 

Raja Kasim, King of Malacca, 194 
Raja Limga, 264 

Raja Mafamut, see Mahmud Shah, 
King of Malacca 
Raja Pute, 243-8, 263 
Raja Quda, King of Java, 230 


Raja Tomjam, see Tomjam 
Raja Zainal- Abidin (Raja Jalim), 
254 

Rajpuri Creek, 48-9 
Rajputana, 37 

Rajputs (Resputes), lxiv, 2, 4, 30-1, 
32-3,36-8,82,513 
Rama Tibodi II, King of Siam, 109 
Ramas, Cape, (Ponta Darrama), 
54-5 

Ramee, see Rembang 
Rampion, 46, 47, 108, 270 
Ramsbottom, John, xii 
Ramusio, Giovanni Battista, xviii, 
lxv-lxix, 13, 21, 23-4, 29, 32-5, 
37, 46, 53, 64, 71-2, 82, 94-8, 
100-2, 109-n, 222, 538; Transla- 
tion of the Suma Oriental , lxv— 
lxviii, lxxiii 
Rander (Ranei), 34 
Rangoon, 98 
Rapes, 92 

RaselHadd (Roscallhate), 14, 19 
Ras Shoke, 295 

Rattans, 136, 146, 148, 150, 153, 
156, 158, 225 

Rau Island, 216 

Raung Mountain, 198 

Real Sociedad Geografica, Madrid, 

202 

Rebelo, J., 1 

Rebelo, Jacinto Inacio de Brito, liii, 
liv, 537 

Red Cap, 19, 23, 28 
Red Sea, xxix, xlvii, lxv, lxxii, 
lxxviii, xciv, 2, 8-9, 291-5, 308-10, 
5 I 5, 517, 520, see Mecca, Strait of 
Regimento de Munich, lxxxix, 
296, 298, 301, 304, 535 
Regimentos (de navega?ao), see 
Nautical Rules 
Regimo de Raja, 281 
Rego, Ambrosio do, xl, xliii, xliv 
Reinel, Jorge, 200-2, 213, 521, 529- 
30 

Reinel, Pedro, 38, 49, 56, 60, 75, 
138, 147, 150, 200-2, 205, 210-1, 
213, 222, 253, 519, 529-31 
Reis Magos, Islands, 129 
Rembang (Ramee), 116, 187, 189, 
192 



570 


INDEX 


R6musat, Abel, li, liii, 539 
Renaissance, lxxvii 
Render (Reneri), 38 
Reparaz, Gonzalo de, 529 
Resende, Garcia de, 40, 102, 539 
Resende, Pedro Barreto de, 93, 108, 

169. 539 

Resputes, see Rajputs 
Revadanda, 49 
Rhio Archipelago, 150 
Rhodes, 58 
Rhubarb, 29, 125, 512 
Ribeiro, Diogo, 34, no, 120, 129, 
221, 53 i 

Ricci, P. Matteo, 1 17, 539 
Rice, 11, 16-7, 21, 30, 43-4, 52, 57 ~ 9 > 
62, 72, 76-7, 84-7, 98, 101, 107, 
112-3, 130, 132, 137, 139, 146, 
148-50, 152-3, 156, 158, 162, 169- 
71, 180, 183-6, 189, 192, 205, 208, 
224, 227, 233, 238, 244, 261, 263, 
269, 278 

Ricinus communis Linn., 69 
Rinjani, Mount, 201 
Rio del Rey (Rio Real), 520 
Risbutos, lxiv, see Rajputs 
Rixia, see Orissa 

Robertson, James Alexander, 102, 

224 . 539 

Rockets, 1 1 5 

Rodrigues, Francisco, Biographical 
sketch, lxxviii - lxxxviii; Book, 
lxxxviii-xcvi, 290—322; Captain of 
a junk to Canton, xxxvi, lxx, xciv; 
Cartographer, lxxviii, lxxix; Ex- 
pedition to the Red Sea, lxxxiv- 
lxxxvii, 291-5, 308-10; Maps, 

lxxxix-xci, 34, 38, 56, 60, 75, 85-6, 
109, 1 17, 120, 122, 129, 131-3, 
138, 142, 154-5. 157, 160, 172, 
192, 200-5, 208-13, 222, 226, 243, 
262, 290-1, 301, 305, 519-26; Nau- 
tical rules, 295-301, 303-5; Pano- 
ramic drawings, xci-xciii, 160, 
200-2, 228, 303, 305, 526-8; Value 
of his work, xcv-xcvi; Voyage of 
discovery to the Spice Islands, 
lxix, lxxix-lxxxiv 
Rodrigues (Tfuzzu), Joao, lxi 
Roget’s Thesaurus, lxi 
Roha Creek, 48-9 


Rokan (Jrcam), 135, i47~8. J 49> I 5 I » 
244,262 

Ronci&re, Charles de la, xii 
Roscallhate, see Ras el Hadd 
Roses, Dried, 8, 17-8 
Rosewater, 8, 13, 17-8. 43. 86, 108, 
170, 269-70 
Roxia, see Russia 

Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 

9° . 

Royal Geographical Society, xn 
Rozengain (Rosolanguim), lxxxi, 205 
Rua do Comercio, xxii 
Rua Nova dos Mercadores, xxii 
Rubies, 85, 96, 98, 108, 115, 275, 
516, 522 

Ruipontiz, Ruiponto or Rapuncio, 
47 

Rumes, Rum, Riimi, 22, 34, 46, 48, 
52, 56-7, 88, 142, 268-70, 525 
Run Island (Pulo Rud), 205-6 
Rupat, 135, 149, 1 5 1, 228, 248, 262 
Rupee, 94 

Rusa Linguette (Jlha Nusaram- 
geti), xcii, 202, 526 
Russia (Roxia), 128 
Ryu Kyu, see Liu Kiu 

Sa, Francisco de, 17 1 

Sabaia (Ship), lxxix, lxxx, lxxxii, 528 

Sabam, see Kundur 

Sabones, 208 

Sacrobosco, 296 

Sadashivgarh, 56 

Sadegam, see Satgaon 

Safavi, 24 

Safi-ud-Din, 24, see Sophy 
Sagar (Qagar), 49, 50 
Sago, 132, 205-6, 208, 209 
Sahoelaoe Lama, 210 
Saiburi, 105 

Sailing, Banda and Moluccas, lxxix- 
lxxxiv, 204, 219-20; Bonuaquelim- 
Malacca, 272; Borneo, 133; Goan- 
ese, 58; Gujaratees, 45; Gujarat- 
Malacca, 269; Malacca-Bengal, 93; 
Malacca-Borneo, 1 23 ; Malacca- 
China, 123, 301-2; Malacca-Java, 
284; Malacca-Pegu, 98; Red Sea, 
lxxxiv-lxxxvi, 11, 14, 17, 291-5 
St. Helena, Island, 520 



INDEX 


St. Jean River, 520 
St. John, 57 
St. John’s Hill, 237 
St. Paul’s Hill (Monte da Alimaria), 
237 

St. Thomas the Apostle, 66, 73 
Sajarah Malayu, The, 229, 537 
Sal River (Rijo de Sail), 54-5 
Saleh Bay, 527 
Salgado, Pero, xx 
Salites, see Selayat 
Salt, 20, 59, 72, 98, 107; Salt fish, 
148; Salt makers, 72; ‘Salt mer- 
chant’, 127 

Saltpetre, 20, 1 15, 125 
Sam Agy Dandan Gimdoz, 230 
Sam Agy Jaya Baya, 230 
Sam Agy Jaya Taton, 230 
Sam Agy Palimbaao, 230-1 
Sam Agy Symgapura, 230-2 
Sam Agy Tamjompura, 231 
Sam Lourengo, Ilha de, see Mada- 
gascar 

Samademga, Ilha de, 526 
Samarang (Camaram), 166, 184, 186 
Samarkand (Qamarcante), lxv, 22 
Sambar Cape, 225 
Samg Briamg, King, 167 
Sampan (Champana), 155 
Samper (Sampit), 132, 223, 225 
Sampitay (? Hsin (or Sun) P’ei t’ai), 
xlix, liv-lix, lxii, lxiii 
San On (Hsin-an), 121 
Sana (Cana), 15, 18 
Sanbenito, 177 
Sandal, 517 

Sandalwood, 16, 43, 86, 93, 108, 
hi, 1 18, 123, 159, 203-4, 222, 
241, 270, 272, 283, 287 
Sandalwood Island or Sumba, 203 
Sangameshwar (Sangizara), 48, 49 
Sangeang Island or Gunong Api 
(Ilha do Fogo), 200-3, 527 
Sangizara, see Sangameshwar 
Santa Barbara (Ship), xxix 
Santa Catarina (Ship), lxxix 
Santa Cruz (Ship), xxx 
Santarem, Viscount de, xiii, xv, 
lxxxvii, xc, xciii, 539; Atlases 
(1841-55), xc-xci 
Santiago (Ship), xxx 


571 

Santo Andre (Ship), xxiv, xxv, xxx 
Santo Cristo (Ship), xxiv, xxv 
Santos, Fr. Joao dos, 94, 539 
Santos, Luis Reis, xii 
Sao Luis, D. Francisco, see Saraiva, 
Cardeal 

S. Roque, Cape, 520 
S. Thome de Meliapor, 91, 272 
S. Tome Island, 290, 520 
Sapan-wood, see Brazil-wood 
Saparua, see Honimoa 
Sapeh (Capee), 134, 228, 526-7 
Saponin Island, 1 3 1 
Sapphires, 1 15, 516 
Sapudi (Pude), lxxxii, lxxxiii, 528 
Saraiva, Cardeal (D. Francisco de 
Sao Luis), xix, xxii, xxiv, 539 
Saranjawa, 189 
Sarasa, 169 
Sarcocol, 516 
Sash or Shash, 125 
Satgaon (Sadegam), 90-1 
Satin, hi, 125-6 
Satonda, 527 

Saussurea lappa C. B. Clarke, 44, 
see Pachak 
Savitri River, 49 
Sawang, 150 
Say, 105 

Sayong Pinang, 251 
Scammony, 515, 518 
Scarlet-in-grain, 43, 93 , 269 
Scented vases, 92 
Schlegel, G., 138, 141, 146, 161, 
229 , 539 

Schnitger, F. M., 113, 539 
Schurhammer, George, 1, 539 
Scotland (Escorgea), 519 
Sea robbers, 147, 149, 196, 202-3, 
205, 224-8, 238, 245, 262, see 
Corsairs and Pirats 
Seara Nova, lxi, lxxxiii 
Sebu, 224 

Second India or Middle India, 5, 
54 , 6 ^5 

Sectaria italica Linn., 44 
Seed Pearls, see Pearls 
Seeds, 169, 270 

Sekampung (Qacampon), 135-6, 
155, 158, 159, 171 
Selamo, see Celammon 



INDEX 


572 

Selangor (Calamgor), 107, 243, 248, 
260 

Selat, 156, see Celates, Archipelago 
Selayat (Salites), lxxx 

Selim the Terrible, 28 
Sembilan, 107 
Senna, 515 

Sequeira, Diogo Lopes de, xxxvi, 
xlvii, xlviii, lxxxiii, 47, 235-6, 
254-8 

Serang River, 186 
Serapin, 515 

Serrao, Francisco, lxxix-lxxxiv, 212, 
214-5,219, 528 
Serrao, Joao, xxiii 
Sesame, 44 

Seville, lxvii, lxxiv, 43, 117 
Sey Debiaa, 35 
Shad, 137, 149, 263 
Shafi’i (Xafij), 24 
Shansi, 126 
Shaopo, lvii 

Shastri Joygad River, 49 
Shebar Entrance (Rio dos Pal- 
mares), 520 
Sheep, 169, 180 
Sheher (Xari, Xaer or Xael), 8 
Sheikh Ismail (Xequesmaell), 1, 
10-11,18,23,25-9,31,62, 

Shensi (Xamcy or Cancy), 125-6 
Sheu-pa (Xopas), xlii 
Shih-tsung (Emperor of China), 
xxxix 

Shi’ites (Zeidis), 18, 24-5, 28 
Ship companies, 46, 269 
Ships (Portuguese), see Anunciada, 
Bel£m, Espera, Frol de la Mar, 
Madalena, Piedade, Sabaia, Santa 
Barbara, Santa Catarina, Santa 
Cruz, Santiago, Santo Andre, 
Santo Cristo, Vitoria (Spanish) 
Shiraz (Xiras), 22, 26-7, 29, 46 
Sholapur (Solapor), 49 
Shushan (Ssusan), 23 
Si Njnje, 164 

Siak (Ciac), 135, 136, 149-150, i5L 
156, 248, 262, 268 

Siam, xxvi, xxx, xliii, lxiv, lxxii, 
lxxiii, lxxix, 2, 13, 17, 29, 42, 45, 
84. 97. 103-10, 111-13, 118-19, 
123, 140, 145, 147, 157, 203, 226, 


232, 238, 243, 248-9, 253, 262-3, 
266, 273, 276, 282, 284, 516, 522 
Siamese, 142, 144, 192, 245, 250, 
253, 257, 268 
Si-an-fu (Xanbu), 126 
Siau (Chiaoa), 221 
Siberut, 162 

Sidayu (Cedayo), 166, 189, 192, 195, 
198, 283, 521, 528 
Sierra Leone (Sera Lyoa), 520 
Sikandar Khan (Xaquendar), Sul- 
tan of Cambay, 3 5 

Sikandar Lodi (Xaquedarxa), King 
of Delhi, 90 
Sikiang, 523 

Silk, 8, 16, 20, 29, 43-4, 89, 93, 
124-6, 130, 136, 140-1, 143-4. 
1 60-1, 163, 270, 272, 277; Raw, 
X15, 125-6 

Silken cloths, 78, 125 
Silva, Antdnio de Moraes e, 16, 47 
Silveira, Joao da, xxv 
Silver, 13, 43-4, 96, 98, 100-1, 104, 
108, 1 14-5, 125, 144, 269; Coin- 
age, 20-1, 104, 275; Value in 
Malacca, 276 
Simbaba, see Sumbawa 
Simon, Walter, xii 
Simpang-kana River, 152 
Sinabafo (Sinabaf), 92, 111, 114, 
133, 169, 180, 207 
Sind (Cindy), 37-8, 513 
Singam, S. Durai Raja, 539 
Singapore (Singapura), 123, 220, 
222-3, 230-3, 236, 241, 244, 262, 
269, 301-2; Black wood from, 

. 123-4 
Singers, 72 

Singkel (Quinchell or Chinqele), 
.135-6, 161, 163 
Singkep, see Pulo Singkep 
Sinhaua or Synhava, 133, 204, 216 
Sinpichon or Sinpichou, lviii, lxiii, 
see Sampitay 
Sitanadi River, 61 
Sitang River, 94, 98 
Slaves, 8, 108, 145, 148-9, 156, 180, 
184, 198, 202-3, 224-5, 227-8, 
269, 284 
Slavonia, 525 
Snakes, 72-3 



INDEX 573 


Soap, 43-4 
Soares, Pero, xxx 

Sociedade de Geografia de Lisboa, 

Boletim da, 90 

Society for the Protection of 
Science and Learning, xii 
Society of Jesus, 1 , lx, lxi 
Socotai, Sukotai or Sukhothai (Cha- 
co tay), 1 10 

Socotrine aloes, 9, 16, 514 
Sodomites, 23 
Soenggirik, 164 
Sofala, 8, 290 

Sokotra (Qocotora), lxxxv, 16, 19, 
43 , 5 i 7 , 520 
Solapor, see Sholapur 
Solomon, lxxv, 283 
Solor (Soloro), lxxxi, lxxxii, lxxxiv, 
1 15, 134 , 200-3, 204, 303,526 
Solor, see Sulu 
Sonmiani, 38 

Sophy, lxvi, x, 10, 23, 24-8, see 
Sheikh Ismail 
Sorcerers, 72-3 
Sorghum, 44 

Sousa, Francisco de, lxi, 539 
Sousa, Manuel de Faria e, xxi, xxii, 
xlii, li, 539 
Spaniards, lxviii 

Spice Islands, xix, lxvii, lxxix- 
lxxxiv, lxxxvii, xciv, xcvi, 200, 
204, 212 

Spikenard, 514 
Spodium, 515 

Sri Nara Diraja (Cerina De Raja), 
193-4, 256, 258, 280, 285 
Srivardham or Shrivardham, 49 
Ssusan, see Shushan 
Staatsbibliothek, Dresden, 531 
Staatsbibliothek, Munich, 529, 532 
Staatsbibliothek, Wolfenbiittel, 

529, 53i 
Stags, 168 
Steel, 13, 92 
Stewart, Charles, 539 
Stobnicza, Joannes de, 5 
Storax, Liquid, ( Liquidambar orien- 
talis Mill.), 13. 46, 1 12, 1 14-5, 
269,517 

Storax, True ( Styrax benzoin Dry- 
and), 13, 517, see Benzoin 


Suakin (Cuaquem), 8, 9, 11, 17, 43, 
295 

Suangi Island, 205 
Suez, xciii, 8, 9, 1 1, 18, 56 
Sugar, 17, 62, 125; Cane, 261; Palm, 
82 

Sugi Islands, 150 
Sukadana, 224 

Sukur Island, xci, see Rusa Lin- 
guette 

Sulayman (Geographer), 120 
Sulayman (Raja C a l eman )> 251-2, 

254 

Sulphur, 20, 1 1 5, 125, 136, 138, 203, 
214, 263, 277 

Sultan of Egypt, lxxxv, 1, 4, 7, 10, 

IS, 28, 525; Prepares armada 
against the Portuguese, 1 x 
Sultan Mahmud, King of Malacca, 
see Mahmud 

Sultan Mahmud, King of Pahang, 
see Mahmud 
Sultan of Turkey, 28 
Sulu (Color), 132, 221, 523 
Suma Oriental of Tome Pires, 
The Paris Codex, xiii-xviii; The 
Lisbon MS, lxiv-lxv; Ramusio’s 
edition, xviii, lxv-lxviii; The Paris 
MS, Ixviii-lxxii; Division of the 
Suma, lxx-lxxiii, 4-5; Where and 
when it was written, lxxii, lxxiii; 
Its value, lxxiv-lxxviii, xcvi, 229 
Sumatra (Camotora), xxvi, lxxiii, 
Ixxvii, lxxxiii, xci, 40, 45, no, 113, 
134, 135-65, 170, 200, 227, 241, 
248, 262-3, 272, 274, 279, 287, 
513-4, 521-2, 532; Gold mines, 
164-5; Measure around, 165; 
The greatest explorer of (1684), 

113 

Sumba or Sandalwood Island, 203 
Sumbawa (Cimbava) Island, lxxxi, 
134, 200-3, 206, 220, 228, 303, 
523, 526-7 

Sumbawa, Village, 527 
Sunda (Cumda), 45, 108, 110, 134, 
157-60, 162, 166-73, 196, 231, 
268, 283-4, 513, S21-2 
Sundacalapa, 168, 171-2, see Calapa 
Sundanese, 167, 173 
Sungi Bertam, 234 



INDEX 


574 

Sungi Jugra, 260 
Sungi Lingi, 259 
Sungi Saleh, 155 
Sungi Sekampung, 158 
Sungi Sempang Kanan or Sungi 
Batu Pahat, 243 
Sungi Sunsang, 155 
Sungi Upang, 155 
Sungidaras, 164 
Sunnis, 1 8, 24, 25 

Surabaya (Curubaia), lxxiii, 166, 
193, 196, 197, 283, 528 
Surat (£urrate), 34-5, 38, 40 
Sutorengo Peak, 187 
Suttee (Burning of widows), Cam- 
bay, 39; Cambodia, 112; Deccan, 
52; Goa, 59; Java, 176-7, 198; 
Narsinga, 63; Sunda, 167 
Suwanose-shima, 129 
Swarnanadi River, 61 
Swords, 19, 93, 1 30-1, 174, 200, 216 
Sybil of Rome, 163 
Sykes, Sir Percy, 27, 539 
Synhava, see Sinhaua 
Syria (Osiria), 10, 28, 30 
Szechwan, 126 

Table Bay, 3 

Tabriz (Taurini and Tauris), 22-3, 
27-8 

Taees, see Taizz 

Tael, 93, 100, 124, 145, 170, 1 81, 
27S-6 

Tafessira or Tafecira, 169, 180 

Taffeta, 115, 125 

Taforio, 180 

Tai chau or Tinhosa, 120 

Tailors, 93 

Tails of white oxen and cows, 181, 
216 

Taizz (Taees), 15 
Tali or Tale and Talikettu, 71 
Talimgano, see Trengganu 
Talingo, see Kalinga 
Taluva, 61 
Tamao, see Turnon 
Tamarind, 82-3, 168, 180, 191, 203, 
5i3 

Tambora Volcano, 527 
Tambraparni River, 81, 271 
Tamgaraor Tamgaram, 166, 171 


Tamhara, 55 

TamianorTamiang River, 176 
Tamjano or Tomjano, 142, I45“6, 
268 

Tamjompura or Tamjunpura (Tan- 
jong Puting), xxvi, 132, 156, 172, 
185, 188, 223-4, 225, 231, 265, 
268, 283-4, 522 
Tamor, 513 
Tampoy, 137, 152 
Tamungo, see Tumunguo 
Tana Malaio or Tana Malayu, 135- 
6, 155, 157, 158 
Tana Muar, 210 
Tanadar and Tanadaria, 56, 58 
Tanah Gojang, 210 
Tanara, 171 
Tanga, 20, 21, 94, 140 
Tangerang, 171 
Tangora, 17 1 

Tanjong Api Api Anom, 528 
Tanjong Besi, 526 
Tanjong Kopondai, 526 
Tanjong Losari, 1 83 
Tanjong Panjang, 259 
Tanjong Parit, see Parit Point 
Tanjong Pontang (Ponta de Char- 
nao), 171 

Tanjong Puting, 223-4, see Tam- 
jompura 

Tanjong Salawai, 221 
Tanjong Sekopong, 158 
Tanjong Sentigi, 172, 521 
Tanjong Tanduru or Tananurong, 
210 

Tanore, Tanur or Tamiyurnagaram 
(Tanor), 74-8, 79 
Tanqat, 93-4 
Tapas of Java, 177 
Tapestries, 13, 29, 270 
Taporbana, 1 1 3 
Tarang, 105 

Tarmapatam, see Durmapatan 
Tartars, 1 , 127, 129 
Tartary (Tartaria), 127-8, 512 
Tata telaya, see Telaja 
Taurini and Tauris, 22, see Tabriz 
Taylor, J. A., 169 
Teak (Jaty wood), 145 
Tectona grandis Ziwi., 145 
Tegal (Teteguall), 166, 184 



INDEX 


Teixeira, Pedro Gomes, xlvii 
Telaja (Tata telaya), 38 
Teleki, Graf Paul, 13 1 
Telinga or Telingana, see Kalinga 

Telok Sumbawa, 527 
Telubin River, 105-6 
TelutiBay, 210 

Temblas Island (Ambelas), 150 
Temenggong, see Tomunguo 
Temple, Sir Richard Camac, 539 
Tenasserim (Tenagarj), 44, 105, 
106, 109-10, 139, 273 
Tenavarque, see Dewundara 
Tenreiro, Antonio, 539 
Teregamparj, see Tranquebar 
Terfe, 303 

Terminalia belerica Roxb., 83 
Terminalia ChebulaRete., 83 
Terminalia citrina Roxb., 83 
Temate, 212, 213-6, 217-9, 221 
Terra Japonica, 47 
Terra Vermelha, 302 
Terram or Terrao, see Trang 
Teteguall, see Tegal 
Thebes, 9, 513 

Thomas, Henry, xii, xvii, xlvii, 539 

Thrace, 22 

Thurston, Edgar, 71, 539 
Tibet, 126 
Tical, see Tiqua 
Ticanamalee, see Trincomalee 
Tico or Tiku (Tiquo), 135-6, 160-1, 
164 

Tidore, 213, 217, 218 
Tidunan (Tidana), 166, 184, 186, 
187 

Tiele, P. A., 537 

Tiga (Tigua), 136, 154, see Calantiga 
Tiger Point (Cabo dos Salltos), 520 
Tigers, 235-6, 260 
Tigris, lxvi, lxx, 4, 30 
Tikal, 99, see Tiqua 
Tilting at the beam, 249 
Timas (Tin), 100, 260-1, 270, 275 
Timoja, 61 
Timom, see Turnon 
Timor, lxxv, 46, 134, 201-2, 203-4, 
268, 283, 523 

Timuta Raja (Utemuta Raja), 183, 
236, 255, 257, 280-2 
Tin, 93-4, 96-7, 99, 100, 105, 108, 


575 

123, 140, 243, 248, 260-1, 272, 
275, see Timas; Value in Malacca, 
270 

Tincal, 44, 516 

Tinhosa Island or Tai chau, 1 20 

Tipura, see Tripura 

Tiqua, 100 

Tiquo, see Tico 

Tir, 30 

Tiricandie, 169-70 
Tiricorij, see Tricodi 
Tirmelwassel (Tirjmalacha), 271 
Tiro River, 140 

Tirumalarajanpatnam (Turjmala- 
patam), 271 
Tiruvalur, 92 
Toledam, 97-8, 102 
Tolo, 221 
Tom or Too, 101 
Tomaschek, Wilhelm, 272, 539 
Tomjam, Raja, 145, see Tamjano 
Tomungo, see Tumunguo 
Tone or Tona, 73 
Tones catures, 73, 81 
Tong-King, Gulf of, xc, 120, 302, 
S23 

Tongkal (Tuncall or Tuquall), 135- 
6, 153, 154 , 157 , 263-4, 268 
Tonle Sap, 302 

Top Kapu Sarayi, Istambul, 530 
Topazes, 180 

Topitis or Topetins, 180, 207 
Tor (Toro), 9, 12, 18, 19, 269 
Toro Besi, 526 

Torre do Tombo, Arquivo Nacional 
da, xx, xxix, Ixviii, 129, 512, 531 
Torreiio, Nuno Garcia de, 132-3, 
202, 205, 211, 213, 530 
Tourane Bay, 302 
Towels, from the Maldives, 100 
Tragacanth, 516 
Trang (Terrao), 2, 105, 107, no 
Trannocem Mudeliar, see Tuan 
Hasan Mudeliar 
Tranquebar or Tarangampadi 
(Teregamparj), 271 
Travancore, 74, 80-1 
Treaty of Saragossa, lxvii 
Trengganu (Talimgano), 2, 105, 
no, 244, 263 

Tricodi (Tiricorij), 74-5, 78 



INDEX 


57 6 

Trigonella foenum graecum Linn., 
46 

Trimurtti, 66 
Trincomalee, 85 
Trinidad Island, 520 
Trinity, 39, 66 
Tripura (Tipura), 89, 90 
Tristan da Cunha Island, 290, 520 
Trong, 105 
TsubuShoto, 129 
Tuam Agem, see Tuan Hasan 
Tuam Adut Alill, 258 
Tuam Aly, 258 
Tuam Amet, 258 
Tuam Banda, 280 
TuamBrajy, 134 
Tuam Colaxcar, 237, 282 
Tuam Mafamut, 256, 280 
Tuam Racan, 258 
Tuam Zedij Amet, 258 
Tuam Zeynar, 258 
Tuan Ali Sri Nara Diraja, 193-4. 
252 

Tuan Fatimah, 258 
Tuan Hasan (Tuam Agem), lvi, 254, 
256, 258, 261 

Tuan Hasan Mudeliar (Tuao 
Nacem Mudeliar or Trannocem 
Mudeliar), Ambassador of the 
King of Malacca to China, xxxviii, 
xliii, lvi, lx 

TuanKundu, 194, 252 
TuanMutahir, 194, 252, 254, 256 
Tuan Perak, 252, 254 
Tuan Perpateh Puteh (Tuam Por- 
pate), 254 

TuanSenaja, 194, 252 
Tuan Tahir, 256 

Tuban (Tubam), 160, 166, 176, 
178-9, 186, 189-92, 282-3, 528 
Tubarao River, 520 
Tufar, see Dhofar 

Tulang Bawang (Tulimbavam), 
135-6, 155, 158-9. 171 
Turnon, Tamao or Timom (Lin Tin 
Island), xxx, xxxiv-xl, xliii, xlvii, 
xlviii, liii, lxii, lxx, 121-2, 123, 302, 
523 

Tumunguo or Tomungo, 134, 244, 
255-6, 264-5, 270, 273, 281 
Tuna Manda, 1 94 


Tuncall, see Tongkal 
Tundaia or Tumdaya (Tael), i 7 °» 
181, 274, 275-6 
Tungkup, 138 

T’un-men or Tuen Moon O, 
1 2 1-2 

Turba, 291 
Turia, 169 
Turin, 132, 202 

Turjmalapatam, see Tirumalara- 
janpatnam 
Turkey, 27-9, 512-5 
Turkistan, 22 

Turkomans, 22, 34, 46, 268-9 
Turks, 22, 48, 50-2, 56, 88, 142, 
209, 268-70, 525 
Turners, 86 
Turpentine, 517-8 
Turpeth, 5x4 
Turquoises, 29, 86 
Turtle Islands, lxxxi 
Turucol or Turicol, 68, 72, 81; of 
Narsinga, 91-2 

Tutam or Tutao (Tu-t’ang), xxxiii 
Tutty, 20, 29 

Ucem, Raja, King of Makyan, 218 
Udipi, 61 

Udipiram, see Vdipiram 

Udiyavara Hole, 61 

Uhden, Richard, 529 

Uli (01u),2io 

Ulim or Olim, 141 

Uparat (Oparaa), 1 10 

Upeh or Upe, 183, 187, 259, 281-2 

Utemuta Raja, see Timuta Raja 

Vaghotan River, 49 
Vaipim, see Vypin 
Valarpattanam, see Baliapatam 
Valencia de Aragon, 5x4 
Valentyn, 118, 229 
Vamistra (? Vamansthali), 33 
Vanjaras, 95 

Vannathamars (Mainates), 72 
Varam, 210 

Varella (Berela), Cape, 302 
Varodrra, see Baroda 
Varthema, Ludovico di, lxvii, 15, 
40,90,213,539 



INDEX 


Vasconcelos, Jorge de, xxiii, lxv 
Vasconcelos, Josd Augusto Frazao 
de, xii 
Vashti, 23 

Vgem Xaa, Sultan (of Bengal), 95 
Vdama (? Menado), 222-3, 225 
Vdipiram, 60-2 

Veleankode or Velijangod (Bely 
Ancoro), 74, 75, 79 

Vellarakkad, 75 
Venetians, 515 
Vengurla, 55 

Veniaga, Ilha da, 121-2, see Tumon 
Venice, lxxv, 12, 219, 269, 287, 517, 
S29 

Vera Cruz, see Perim Island 
Veraval, see Patan 
Verbeck, R. D. M., 190, 539 
Verga, Ben, 298 

Vermilion, 13, 43, 98, 108, 111-2, 
269, 277 

Vernam, see Bernam 
Veth, P. J., 168, 539 
Vettuvans (Beituaas), 72 
Viga, 99, 1 00- 1 
Viegas, Joao, 512 
Vieira, Adriano Lopes, xii 
Vieira, Cristovao, xx, xxxv, xxxvii, 
xxxix-xlix, lii-liv, lxiii, 117; Let- 
ters of 1524, xx, xlv-xlviii 
Vijayanagar (Bizanaguar), 63-4 
Vijaydurg or Vijayadurg, 49 
Vilinjam (Bilinjao), 74-5, 76, 80, 83 
Vinay Point, 302 
Vindhya Range, 36-7 
Vintem, 36, 94 
Vioma, see Pulo Tioman 
Visapor, see Bijapur 
Vispice or Bespiga, 86 
Viss, see Viga 
Vitara, see Wetta 

Viterbo, Francisco M. de Sousa, 
lxxxvii, 540 

Viterbo, Joaquim de Santa Rosa de, 

76, 540 

Vitoria (Ship), 202, 213 
Vitriol, 20, 44 
Vizinho, Jos6, 298 
Voretzsch, E. A., xx, lxiii, 540 
Vull, see Honimoa 
Vya Chacotay (Oya Socotai), no 


577 

Vypin or Vypeen (Vaipim), 79, 80 

Wadi Fatima, 14 
Wahai, 210 
Wai Bobot, 210 
Wairama, 210 
Waitarna River, 39 
Warner Point, 291 
Wasai or Waisoi, 212 
Washermen, 72 

Watt, Sir George, 9, 13, 44, 46-7, 69, 
540 

Wax, 29, 44, 108, 132, 136, 146, 148, 
150, 153. 156-8, 160-1,183,224-5, 
263 

We, 138 

Weapons, 43, see Arms; Poisoned, 
227 

Wei-ch’iieh-lou or Wei-kiu6-leou, 
lvii, lix, see Junquileu 
Weight, Measures of, see Measures 
Weights, in Portugal (fifteenth and 
sixteenth centuries), 277 
Weligama (Balimgao), 85-6 
West River or Sikiang, 523 
Western superiority, Modern as- 
sumption of, 1 16 

Wetta, Wettar or Wetter (Vitara), 
lxxxi, 202, 204 

Wheat, 11, 16, 21, 33, 43, 44, 52, 88, 
130,525 

Whitworth, George Clifford, 95, 
54 ° 

Widows, Burning of, see Suttee 
Wilkinson, R. J., 194, 229, 251, 252, 
254 , 256, 54 °. 

Willis Mountains, 190 
Windham, Thomas, lxxxvii 
Wines, native, Borneo, 225; Cam- 
bodia, 1 12; Java, 169; Liu kiu, 
1 30-1; Malabar, 72; Malacca, 244; 
Malacca wine like brandy, 13 1; 
Sumatra, 137, 139, 146, 148-50, 
1 53, 156; Wine makers, 72; Wine 
Measure, 278; see Arrack and 
Tampoy 

Winstedt, R. O., 151, 194, 229-31, 
251,252,258, 540 
Winter, Heinrich, 530 
Withers, Margery, xii 
Women pregnant by the wind, 162 



INDEX 


578 

Wood, W. A. R., 1 10, 540 
Woollen cloths, 29, 43, 93, 123, 269 
Wormwood, 44, 512 
Wu-Pei-Chih, 106 
Wu-T’ing-chii, xxxii 
Wu-tsung, Emperor of China, xxxix 

Xaas, 125-6 

Xabandar, 126, 133, 244, 264, 265, 
270, 273-4 
Xacatara, see Jacatra 
Xafij, see Shafi’i 
Xamcy, 126, see Shensi 
Xanbu, 126, see Si-an-fu 
Xaquedarxa, see Sikandar Lodi 
Xaquem Darxa, see Muhammad 
Iskandar Shah 

Xaquendar, see Sikandar Khan 
Xari, Xaer or Xael, see Sheher 

Xecbarqate, 1 1 

Xequesmaell, see Sheikh Ismail 

Xerafim, 21, 275 

Xerxes, 23 

Xieng-mai, 109 

Xilingau (? Yangchow), lv, lvii 

Xiras or Xiria, see Shiraz 

Xitacy, see Shiraz 

Xoij, 102 

Xopas (Sheu-pa), xliii 


Xurca, 526 
Xylobalsamum, 515 

Yangchow, lvii 
Yangtze Kiang, lv, lvii 
Yeast, 517 

Yellow River, lviii-lix, 126 
Yen Kuang-ta, lvii 
Ying-hsiang, xxxiv 
Ying-yai Sheng-lan, 140 
Yravas or Iravas, 72 
Yta, see Hitu 

Yule, Sir Henry, lvii, lix, lx, 53, 56, 
64-5, 75, 81-2, 95, 97, 99, 1 19, 
126, 131, 138, 162, 170, 540 
Yule, W.,25 

Zabid, 15 

Zacuto, Abraao, 298-9 

Zam, 303 

Zamorin, 78-9 

Zayton, 119 

Zea Mays Linn., 44 

Zebit, see Zabid 

Zedoary, 516-7 

Zeidis, see Shi’ites 

Zeila, 8, 11, 14, 16, 19, 43, 292 

Zeimoto, Diogo, 128, 13 1 

Zimme, see Jangoma